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Workplace stress and the quality of teacher-child relationships in Head Start

Objective: The quality of the emotional relationship between teachers and young children affects children's social and emotional development and their academic success. Little is known, however, about whether the amount of workplace stress experienced by early childhood educators impacts the quality of their relationships with the young children in their classrooms. The purpose of this dissertation was to determine whether workplace stress was associated with poorer quality teacher-child relationships in Head Start, the nation's largest federally-funded early childhood education program. Methods: Two separate but complementary studies were conducted. In Study 1, teachers from 37 Head Start programs in Pennsylvania (PA) completed the Staff Wellness Survey (SWS), an anonymous, web-based survey about workplace stress and the levels of conflict and closeness in their relationships with children in their classrooms. Study 2 data came from an existing federal data set, the 2006 Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES). In FACES, a nationally representative sample of Head Start teachers responded to interview questions about workplace stress and were observed and rated on the quality of their teacher-child relationships in their classrooms. In both studies, the association of poor quality teacher-child relationships was examined with the presence or absence of 3 types of perceived workplace stress: high demands (above median), low control (below median), and low support (below median). Results: In Study 1, surveys were completed by 994 teachers (52.0% of teachers in the 37 PA programs), of whom 19.8% experienced 0 of the 3 types of workplace stress, and 23.3% experienced all 3 types. Teachers experiencing all 3 types of workplace stress were more likely than those experiencing 0 types to report high conflict (upper quartile) in their relationships with children, even after controlling for teacher depressive symptoms and economic stressors (odds ratio [OR] = 1.98, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-3.29). Only low control was significantly associated with low closeness (lowest quartile) in teacher-child relationships after adjusting for covariates (OR = 1.50, 95% CI: 1.09-2.05). In Study 2, data were available from 325 teachers (89.0% of teachers participating in FACES), of whom 19.4% experienced none of the 3 types of workplace stress and 38.5% reported experiencing [greater than or equal to] 2 types. Teachers experiencing [greater than or equal to] 2 types of workplace stress were more likely to have poor observed teacher-child relationship quality (below median) than teachers reporting 0 types of workplace stress (OR = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.22-5.90). Conclusion: In both a large sample of Pennsylvania Head Start teachers and a nationally representative sample of Head Start teachers, higher perceived workplace stress was associated with poorer teacher-child relationship quality. In light of these findings, Head Start should consider more closely examining and addressing workplace stress as part of its professional development and training activities for teachers. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

January, 2013

The role of cognitive stimulation at home in low-income preschoolers' nutrition, physical activity and body mass index

Background: Early childhood obesity disproportionately affects children of low socioeconomic status. Children attending Head Start are reported to have an obesity rate of 17.9%.This longitudinal study aimed to understand the relationship between cognitive stimulation at home and intake of junk food, physical activity and body size, for a nationally representative sample of 3- and 4-year old children entering Head Start. Methods: We used The Family and Child Experiences Survey 2006. Cognitive stimulation at home was measured for 1905 children at preschool entry using items from the Home Observation Measurement of the Environment Short Form. Junk food consumption and physical activity were obtained from parent interviews at kindergarten entry. BMI z scores were based on CDC national standards. We analyzed the association between early cognitive stimulation and junk food consumption, physical activity and BMI, using multinomial and binary logistic regression on a weighted sample. Results: Children who received moderate levels of cognitive stimulation at home had a 1.5 increase in the likelihood of consuming low amounts of junk food compared to children from low cognitive stimulation environments. Children who received moderate and high levels of cognitive stimulation were two and three times, respectively, more likely to be physically active than those in low cognitive stimulation homes. No direct relationship was identified between cognitive stimulation and BMI. Conclusion: Prevention and treatment efforts to address early childhood obesity may consider strategies that support parents in providing cognitively stimulating home environments. Existing evidence-based programs can guide intervention in pediatric primary care. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

01 August, 2017

Chaotic experiences and low-income children's social-emotional development

Development in early childhood is increasingly likely to take place in multiple contexts. Continuity and discontinuity in children's experiences across multiple contexts have important implications for their development. This study examines the extent to which children experience chaos in their homes and in their preschool settings is linked with their social-emotional development over the course of the preschool year. Data from a large, representative sample of low-income preschool children attending Head Start was used to test a series of multi-level models. Children whose experiences of their homes were highly chaotic, regardless of the how chaotic their experiences of their classroom were, decreased in their social-emotional skills over the preschool year. Chaotic experiences in the home environment thus appear to have more influence on children's development than do chaotic preschool experiences. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

November, 2016

Head Start teachers across a decade: Beliefs, characteristics, and time spent on academics

We examined changes in teachers' beliefs regarding developmentally appropriate practice (DAP) in 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009 using data from the Head Start Family and Child Experience Survey. In addition, we examined how teacher education, credentials, and professional experience relate to beliefs about DAP and explored how these relationships differ by cohort. We also explored teachers' reports of time spent in math and literacy focused activities. Findings indicate that after 2003, developmentally appropriate beliefs decreased significantly, while developmentally inappropriate beliefs increased. Results also showed significant increases in the frequency of literacy activity across the decade, while the frequency of math activity was more consistent. Despite these changes, teachers with more education consistently held the most appropriate beliefs. These findings indicate that teacher education may buffer against influences of pushed down curricula and increased accountability. This study also illustrates that policies at the national level have the potential to impact children's day-to-day classroom experiences. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

September, 2017

Is full day better than half day?: A propensity score analysis of the association between Head Start program intensity and children's school performance in kindergarten

Research Findings: This study used data from a national sample to examine differences in school outcomes at the end of kindergarten between Head Start children who attended full-day and half-day programs. Propensity scores were used to match children who experienced different intensities of the program on a series of demographic characteristics in order to achieve a more unbiased estimation of the intensity effect. Analyses were performed on 2 different age cohorts: 3-year-olds who enrolled in the program for 2 years and 4-year-olds who enrolled in the program for 1 year. The results showed that in comparison to a demographically comparable group of children who attended the Head Start half-day program, children who experienced the more intensive full-day program showed no significant differences on any of the 5 academic and social outcome measures examined. Practice or Policy: Policy and practice implications, as well as future research ideas, are discussed within this context. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

February/March 2017

Tracking quality in Head Start classrooms: FACES 2006 to FACES 2014: Technical report

In this report, we highlight findings from cross-cohort analyses of data from the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) 2006, 2009, and 2014. The analyses (1) provide a descriptive portrait of observed classroom quality and other relevant classroom, teacher, and program characteristics at each time period; (2) determine the existence of trends or patterns in observed classroom quality and selected classroom, teacher, and program characteristics across cohorts; and (3) examine whether changes in such characteristics can explain the trends in observed classroom quality fully, partially, or not at all. We first describe the research questions the analyses are intended to address and then provide a brief overview of the FACES design across cohorts, including a description of any caveats related to the instrumentation and sampling across cohorts. Next, we describe our analytic approach and summarize findings from each analysis. We conclude this report with a discussion of the implications of the findings for future research. A companion policy brief (Aikens et al. 2016), also highlights a subset of the current findings. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

November, 2016

Validity of the first two subtests of the Preschool Language Assessment Scale as a language screener for Spanish-speaking preschool children

Large-scale early childhood studies use the first two subscales of the Preschool Language Assessment Scale, "Simon Says" and "Art Show" (PreLAS2000; Duncan & De Avila, 1998) to guide decisions about the most appropriate language (or languages) researchers should use when directly assessing the academic skills of dual language learner (DLL) children. Large-scale studies use a cut-score derived from a total score on the two PreLAS subscales in English and/or Spanish in combination with parent or teacher reports of children's language abilities, to route children into the most appropriate language of assessment. However, limited research exists to support the use of these cut-scores as part of a language routing procedure with Spanish-speaking DLL preschool children from low-income backgrounds. The current study examined the validity of the two English PreLAS subscale scores for a local sample of children enrolled in Head Start (N = 872) and Hispanic children from the national FACES 2006 sample (N = 935). Rasch and DIF analyses supported the invariance of item difficulty values across the three- and four-year-old age groups in the overall sample. For a subsample of Spanish-speaking DLL children, receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analyses identified the most appropriate cut-scores on the PreLAS screener for both age groups. Findings provided evidence to support the validity of the use of the English PreLAS language screener score as part of a more comprehensive language routing procedure. Implications for policy, practice, and measurement development are discussed. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

Q1 2017

Quality rating and improvement systems: Secondary data analyses of psychometric properties of scale development

The results of this secondary data analysis simulating a QRIS validation using six large early care and education datasets demonstrate several issues that should be considered when constructing, validating, and making changes to existing quality ratings. First, QRIS are developed from logic models that involve multiple outcome areas such as improving children's outcomes, professionalization of the workforce, family engagement, and ECE systems building. The analyses reported here suggest that separate QRIS rating scales will be needed for each of these dimensions unless they are highly correlated. Second, selection of the quality indicators should be based on the consistency and magnitude of effects in research literature. The QRIS rating is more likely to accurately measure quality when there is good evidence that we know how to measure the included quality indicators in a manner that predicts desired outcomes for the QRIS. Third, use of validated professional guidelines for defining the cut-points in the rating scales can maintain the information in the selected quality measures as they are converted into ratings to form the QRIS score. Results from this secondary data analysis suggest that a QRIS score reflecting classroom quality based on these principles predicts small but significant gains in children's academic outcomes. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

May, 2016

Using bifactor models to measure teacher-child interaction quality in early childhood: Evidence from the Caregiver Interaction Scale

Bifactor models have great promise to support the measurement of adult-child interaction in early childhood settings but are not frequently used in the field. This study explored whether a bifactor model fit teacher-child interaction data gathered from the Caregiver Interaction Scale (CIS; Arnett, 1989) in four cohorts of the recent Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) study (1997-2006). Analyses also examined concurrent validity of this approach using several teacher- and child-level variables. In total, 1422 Head Start classrooms were observed with the CIS. Factor analyses found that a bifactor model, featuring one factor for overall positive teacher-child interaction as well as two methodological factors accounting for whether items targeted appropriate or (reverse-coded) inappropriate behaviors, fit the data well, consistent with other recent work. Further, evidence of concurrent validity for this bifactor model of teacher-child interaction emerged with lead teachers' background factors (experience and CDA credential) and their global classroom quality, as well as children's prosocial skills. Overall, results illustrate both the utility and logistics of the bifactor model approach to measuring interaction quality in early childhood settings. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

Q3 2016

Testing for dosage-outcome associations in early care and education

In this chapter, we turn to the question of whether there is evidence of an association between children's development and the quantity or dosage of ECE across several large studies. As follow-up to the results summarized in the literature review, it is important to control adequately for selection effects in studying effects of dosage. There is also a need to examine different measures of dosage to see if consistent patterns of findings emerge across different measurement approaches. Accordingly, in this chapter, we will summarize analyses by using more rigorous approaches to controlling for selection than those used in previous research and will adopt several approaches to operationalizing dosage. Again, we are seeking replicated findings, as indicated in this section by similar significant findings across projects in analyses of dosage. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

June, 2016

Testing for quality thresholds and features in early care and education

In this chapter, we report on the analyses focusing on both quality thresholds and quality features. First, we address questions about quality thresholds, using two analytic approaches. The analyses ask whether there is evidence suggesting thresholds in the association between a specific quality measure and a specific child outcome. Second, we extend these analyses to ask whether each child outcome is more strongly related to global quality measures or to quality measures that measure teacher-child interactions or quality of instruction in a given content area. The research to date provides the basis for the articulation of two hypotheses related to quality thresholds and features: (1) the quality of ECE is a stronger predictor of residualized gains in child outcomes in classrooms with higher quality than in classrooms with lower quality and (2) more specific measures of quality are stronger predictors of residualized gains in child outcomes than are global measures. We turn now to analyses intended to address these hypotheses by using data from several data sets. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

June, 2016

Predicting growth trajectories in early academic learning: Evidence from growth curve modeling with Head Start children

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between children's academic and social-emotional skill levels at entry into Head Start (HS) and their subsequent academic growth through HS and into kindergarten. We first examined HS children's growth trajectories in math, reading, and receptive vocabulary skills over a period of 2.5 years (i.e., between HS entry and kindergarten). Then, we examined whether children's capabilities in academic and social-emotional skills at HS entry were associated with their academic growth trajectories. The study was guided by two competing theories on the effectiveness of early care and education (ECE) programs, the "skills-beget-skills hypothesis" and the "compensatory hypothesis." A sample from the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey 2006 Cohort (FACES 2006) was analyzed using three-level growth curve modeling. Children who had lower receptive vocabulary skills at HS entry showed faster growth in receptive vocabulary skills. This result supports the compensatory hypothesis, which suggests that quality ECE programs have larger program effects for more disadvantaged children. For math and reading skills, no association between children's entry-level skills and their growth rate was found. Social-emotional skills at HS entry were positively associated with either concurrent baseline academic skills or their growth rate over time, partially supporting the skills-beget-skills hypothesis, which posits that the skills children possess before an intervention allow them to better acquire program benefits. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

Q3 2016

Parent involvement in Head Start and children's development: Indirect effects through parenting

The authors examined the extent to which parent involvement in Head Start programs predicted changes in both parent and child outcomes over time, using a nationally representative sample of 1,020 three-year-old children over 3 waves of the Family and Child Experiences Survey. Center policies that promote involvement predicted greater parent involvement, and parents who were more involved in Head Start centers demonstrated increased cognitive stimulation and decreased spanking and controlling behaviors. In turn, these changes in parenting behaviors were associated with gains in children's academic and behavioral skills. These findings suggest that Head Start programs should do even more to facilitate parent involvement because it can serve as an important means for promoting both parent and child outcomes. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

April, 2016

Combating obesity in Head Start: Outdoor play and change in children's body mass index

Objective: To determine whether increased outdoor play time at Head Start was associated with greater changes in body mass index (BMI) over the course of a preschool year. Method: The authors used data from 2810 children from the Family and Child Experiences Survey 2006 cohort. With children's spring BMI as the outcome (both continuously measured and dichotomized to measure the risk of obesity), the authors conducted weighted regression analyses, controlling for child-level, family-level, and school-level covariates, including preschool entry BMI. Results: Children played outdoors at school for roughly 37 minutes per day, with little variation across half-day and full-day programs. The more children played outdoors, the more their BMI decreased over the preschool year ([beta] =-.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) [-0.08 to -0.01]) and the less likely they were to be obese (odds ratio = 0.99, 95% CI [0.98-0.99]). The difference between high levels and low levels of outdoor play corresponded to 0.18 BMI points and a 42% reduction in children's risk of obesity. Sixty minutes was the "tipping point" for the association between outdoor play time and improvements in children's BMI. These associations were also stronger among children who were obese at the start of the year, less active at home, and living in unsafe neighborhoods. Conclusion: Outdoor play time at Head Start is associated with decreases in children's BMI scores and, thus, may serve as an important means of preventing obesity. Head Start programs should consider establishing clear guidelines encouraging more outdoor time. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

October, 2015

Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) 2006 Cohort online training and Q&A

This webinar provides a detailed description of the available data and potential uses of the dataset of the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES), 2006 Cohort. Included in this presentation are discussions of the study's purposes, design, and technical issues, as well as detailed descriptions of data collection instruments, data file variables, approaches to data weighting, and other issues related to the use of FACES 2006 data in secondary analyses studies.

Multimedia

16 November, 2010

Learning-related social skills as a mediator between teacher instruction and child achievement in Head Start

Using a subsample of the Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) 2006, this study examined the associations between the amount of teacher instruction in 292 Head Start classrooms with changes in young children's (n = 936) early academic achievement and learning-related social skills from ages three to five. In general, during the early years, children exhibited relatively stable academic and learning-related social skills. Although the amount of teacher instruction did not predict children's short-term academic growth directly, it did predict it indirectly through improvements in learning-related social skills, with benefits lasting through the end of kindergarten. These findings demonstrate that gains in children's learning-related social skills may be necessary before academic gains can be realized. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

November, 2015

Building vocabulary in two languages: An examination of Spanish-speaking dual language learners in Head Start

This study examines the English and Spanish vocabulary skills that young Dual Language Learners (DLLs) bring to Head Start, as well as their vocabulary learning over the year. Further, we isolate the unique contributions of various child, family, teacher, and classroom factors to these skills. Participants were drawn from a recent cohort of the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey. Results show that, for both Spanish and English vocabulary, child and family factors, especially the prevalence of each language in the household, play a role in initial skills and end-of-year skills. The quality of the language of classroom instruction also predicts Spanish and English vocabulary learning over the year for all children; in English, this relation is significantly greater for children with the lowest initial skills. Findings elucidate potential leverage points for intervention to improve Spanish and English vocabulary outcomes during Head Start for these vulnerable early learners. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

Q2 2015

Head Start and housing (in)stability: Examining the school readiness of children experiencing homelessness

Drawing on data from the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES), a nationally representative sample of low-income children enrolled in Head Start, this brief examines young children's progress over a two-year enrollment period across three key indicators of school readiness: socio-emotional, cognitive, and health-related outcomes. A cohort of three-year old children was assessed in the fall of 2006, when children entered Head Start, and again in the spring of 2008, when they completed the program. This brief compares children in the cohort who are homeless or highly mobile (HHM) with the cohort's low-income but stably housed children to determine what differences in outcomes, if any, exist between housing groups. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

September, 2013

Screen time at home and school among low-income children attending Head Start

A survey of television, computer, and video game use in a sample of 2,221 children in Head Start, including comparisons of viewing patterns in homes and classrooms, as well as an identification of household factors associated with high levels of screen time in homes

Reports & Papers

June, 2014

Vocabulary learning in Head Start: Nature and extent of classroom instruction and its contributions to children's learning

In the current study, we employed the 2006 cohort of the large-scale, nationally representative, Head Start Family and Child Experiences (FACES) dataset to construct a snapshot of vocabulary instruction and learning in high-poverty preschools. Specifically, we examined Head Start teachers' reports of the frequency of vocabulary instruction in their classrooms as well as the overall quality of their classroom instruction. We also explored the teacher- and center-level factors that predicted these dual aspects of instruction, and the role of that instruction in children's vocabulary development over the preschool year. Participants included 293 teachers in 116 Head Start centers, as well as 2501 children in their classrooms. Results showed that, whereas there was notable variation, most teachers reported providing a variety of vocabulary-focused instructional activities nearly every day. The quality of their classroom instruction was generally modest. Classroom instructional quality was predictive of children's vocabulary learning, with stronger relations apparent for children with lower initial skills and for classrooms with higher quality instruction. The frequency of instruction in vocabulary was not related to children's word learning. Results provide new descriptive data about the state of vocabulary instruction in Head Start preschools and highlight both areas of success and opportunities for additional support. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

June, 2013

Mathematics instruction in Head Start: Nature, extent, and contributions to children's learning

This study employed the most recent (2006) cohort of the nationally representative Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) to explore the nature of mathematics instruction in Head Start and the child, family, and teacher factors that contribute to children's mathematics learning over the preschool year. In total, 2501 preschoolers and their families, as well as their teachers (n = 335), participated in the study from fall 2006 to spring 2007. Results showed that teachers reported frequent mathematics instruction, although direct observations did not entirely confirm this frequency. A variety of factors predicted children's mathematics knowledge at Head Start entry, and several - including instructional quality - were linked to learning over time. No thresholds in instructional quality emerged. Overall, this study provides new information about classroom mathematics instruction and child learning among the nation's most vulnerable early learners. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

September/October 2013

Identifying family and classroom practices associated with stability and change of social-emotional readiness for a national sample of low-income children

Among a nationally representative sample of 2,529 Head Start children, patterns of social-emotional readiness were identified at the beginning and end of children's first preschool year. This study documented that although the majority of children remain in a qualitatively similar social-emotional readiness profile across the year, 34% of children move to a qualitatively different profile reflecting improvements and declines in social-emotional functioning. Child and family attributes (e.g., child age, disability status, and maternal education), as well as contextual factors (e.g., weekly parent home involvement) were significant predictors of these classification patterns, and parents' involvement in educational activities at home significantly moderated transitions among the profiles. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

April, 2013

Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey Parent Interview: Spanish Version (FACES 2006): Spring 2008/09

Instruments

Spring 2008

Report to Congress on dual language learners in Head Start and Early Head Start programs

A study that examines: the characteristics of dual language learner Head Start and Early Head Start children and their families; the services they receive; the qualifications of staff that serve them; the languages that staff use to communicate with them; and dual language learner children's developmental progress, based on Head Start Program Information Report data, Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey 2006 (FACES 2006) data, and Early Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (Baby FACES) data

Reports & Papers

Amount and environmental predictors of outdoor playtime at home and school: A cross-sectional analysis of a national sample of preschool-aged children attending Head Start

An estimation of the amount of time children attending Head Start spend playing outdoors at both home and at school, and an examination of the relationship between outdoor play time and both the home and school environment, based on data from 2,529 children in Head Start in spring 2007 from the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES)

Reports & Papers

November, 2012

Data tables for FACES 2009 Head Start children, families, and programs: Present and past data from FACES report

Data tables from a profile of the characteristics of Head Start children and families and their home and Head Start classroom environments in fall 2009, including children's cognitive, physical, and socioemotional development, and Head Start classroom curricula and activities, based on data collected from a sample of 60 Head Start programs, 129 centers, 486 classrooms, and 3,349 children

Other

December, 2011

Head Start children, families, and programs: Present and past data from FACES

A profile of the characteristics of Head Start children and families and their home and Head Start classroom environments in fall 2009, including children's cognitive, physical, and socioemotional development, and Head Start classroom curricula and activities, and a comparison to profiles from 2000, 2003, and 2006, based on data collected in fall 2009 from a sample of 60 Head Start programs, 129 centers, 486 classrooms, and 3,349 children

Reports & Papers

December, 2011

ACF/OPRE report: Data tables for FACES 2006: A second year in Head Start report

Data tables from a profile of the development, families, and home environments of children participating in their second year of Head Start who had entered the program at age 3 in the fall of 2006, based on spring 2008 data from the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey 2006 (FACES 2006)

Other

December, 2010

ACF/OPRE report: Data tables for FACES 2006: Head Start children go to kindergarten report

Data tables from a profile of the development, families, and home and school environments of kindergarten children who had entered Head Start in the fall of 2006, based on data from the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey 2006 (FACES 2006)

Other

December, 2010

ACF/OPRE report: Head Start children go to kindergarten

A profile of the development, families, and home and school environments of kindergarten children who had entered Head Start in the fall of 2006, based on data from the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey 2006 (FACES 2006)

Reports & Papers

December, 2010

ACF-OPRE report: A second year in Head Start: Characteristics and outcomes of children who entered the program at age three

A profile of the development, families, and home environments of children participating in their second year of Head Start who had entered the program at age 3 in the fall of 2006, based on spring 2008 data from the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey 2006 (FACES 2006)

Reports & Papers

December, 2010

ACF-OPRE report: Data tables for FACES 2006: A year in Head Start report

Data tables from a profile of the characteristics of Head Start children and families and their home and Head Start classroom environments from fall 2006 through spring 2007, including children's cognitive, physical, and socioemotional development, and Head Start classroom curricula and activities, based on data collected from a sample of 60 Head Start programs, 135 centers, 410 classrooms, 365 teachers, and 3,315 children and their parents

Other

October, 2010

ACF-OPRE report: A year in Head Start: Children, families and programs

A profile of the characteristics of Head Start children and families and their home and Head Start classroom environments from fall 2006 through spring 2007, including children's cognitive, physical, and socioemotional development, and Head Start classroom curricula and activities, based on data collected from a sample of 60 Head Start programs, 135 centers, 410 classrooms, 365 teachers, and 3,315 children and their parents

Reports & Papers

October, 2010

Kindergarten Followup to the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey: Teacher's Child Report Form: (FACES 2006) Spring 2008/09

Instruments

Spring 2008

Kindergarten Followup to the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey: Kindergarten Teacher Survey: (FACES 2006) Spring 2008/09

Instruments

Spring 2008

Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey Education Coordinator Interview (FACES 2006): Fall 2006

Instruments

Fall 2006

Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey Center Director Interview (FACES 2006): Fall 2006

Instruments

Fall 2006

Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey Program Director Interview (FACES 2006): Fall 2006

Instruments

Fall 2006

Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey Teacher Interview (FACES 2006): Spring 2008

Instruments

Spring 2008

Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey: Teacher's Child Report Form: Head Start (FACES 2006) Spring 2008

Instruments

Spring 2008

Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey: Head Start and Kindergarten Parent Interview (FACES 2006): Spring 2008/09

Instruments

Spring 2008

Kindergarten ECLS-B Mathematic Assessment (FACES)

Instruments

Spring 2008

FACES Instrument Matrix

The Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) uses many instruments to collect data. This document provides a complete list of the FACES instruments indexed in the Research Connections' database. Every instrument is hyperlinked to its corresponding record and "X"s designate which cohorts they were used in. Other alpha characters represent the instruments' availability: OS = obtainable through the original source; RC = obtainable through Research Connections. While all instruments are listed, those instruments that are copyrighted are not available. To access a particular instrument, click on the appropriate link.

Other

Summer 2010

Study design and data tables for the FACES 2006 baseline report

An overview of the study design of the fall 2006 Head Start Family and Child Experiences (FACES) Survey and data tables to accompany a profile of the characteristics of newly enrolled Head Start children and families and their home and Head Start classroom environments in fall 2006

Other

December, 2008

Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (4th ed.)

Instruments

2007

FACES 2006 study design

Highlights of the 2006 Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) study design

Fact Sheets & Briefs

March, 2007

Pre-LAS 2000

Instruments

1998

Block Child Rearing Practices Report

Instruments

1965

Counts of Staff/Children

Instruments

Social Skills

Instruments

Name Writing Task

Instruments

Cooperative Classroom Behavior (Teacher Report)

Instruments

Social Skills and Positive Approach to Learning (Parent Report)

Instruments

Behavior Problems Scale (Teacher Report)

Instruments

Child Behavior Problems Index

Instruments

Story and Print Concepts

Instruments

Color Names and Counting

Instruments

Preschool Learning Behaviors Scale

Instruments

2000

Teacher Beliefs Scale

Instruments

1990

Classroom Assessment Scoring System Pre-K

Instruments

2008

Leiter International Performance Scale (Rev. ed.)

Instruments

1997

Personal Maturity Scale

Instruments

1988

Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale

Instruments

1977

Woodcock-Johnson III

A second revision of the original set of tests intended to measure cognitive abilities, oral language, and academic achievement in individuals 2 to 90 years or older

Instruments

2001

Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery (Rev. ed.)

Instruments

1990

Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale (Rev. ed.)

A revised version of the original ECERS, designed to assess the quality of environments in preschool, kindergarten, and child care programs for children ages 2.5 to 5 years

Instruments

1998

Caregiver Interaction Scale

A scale for measurement of the quality of caregivers' interactions with children

Instruments

1985-1986