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Related Resource of Resource 4361

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Result Resource Type Publication Date

Does higher quality early child care promote low-income children's math and reading achievement in middle childhood?
Dearing, Eric; McCartney, Kathleen; Taylor, Beck A.

A longitudinal investigation of the role of attendance in high quality child care as a moderating factor between family economic status and children's academic success in elementary school, based on a sample of 1,364 children followed from birth to age 11

Reports & Papers

September/October 2009

Family and child factors related to the use of non-maternal infant care: An English study
Sylva, Kathy; Stein, Alan; Leach, Penelope; Barnes, Jacqueline; Malmberg, Lars-Erik;

An examination of the extent to which the use of non-maternal child care are effected by family and child characteristics, including family income levels, parent education levels, and maternal employment

Reports & Papers

Q1 2007

Child-care selection from birth to age three: The influence of family economy, demographics, and parenting attitudes
Wolf, Anne;

Two studies using data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development examined family variations in timing and type of children's initial child care arrangements and then variations in amount of hours spent in child care per week from birth to age three

Reports & Papers

2004

Relations between family predictors and child outcomes: Are they weaker for children in child care? [Abridged]
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network;

An abridged reprint of a study reporting analyses of the mediating effect of nonparental child care on the influence of family factors on infant and toddler cognitive and behavioral development using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care

Reports & Papers

2005

Early child care and children's peer interaction at 24 and 36 months [Abridged]
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network;

An abridged reprint of a study of how time spent in child care, child care quality, and availability of peers relate to children's peer social competence at 23 and 36 months, using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care

Reports & Papers

2005

The effects of infant child care on infant-mother attachment security [Abridged]
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network;

A study of the interaction between child care quality, stability, amount and mother-child relatedness in the first 3 years of life

Reports & Papers

2005

Before Head Start: Income and ethnicity, family characteristics, child care experiences, and child development [Abridged]
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network;

A description of demographic, family context, income, and developmental characteristics of Head Start children and their families at 3 years of age, based on data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care

Reports & Papers

2005

Familial factors associated with the characteristics of nonmaternal care for infants [Abridged]
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network;

An examination of the associations between four aspects of nonmaternal infant child care, age of entry, amount, type, and quality, and preexisting family characteristics, economics, and psychosocial factors

Reports & Papers

2005

The link between daycare experience and attitudes toward daycare and maternal employment
Shpancer, Noam; Bennett-Murphy, Laura;

A study of the child care experiences, and the attitudes and expectations toward child care, maternal employment and future parenting among students in a small Midwestern college

Reports & Papers

2006

Mothers' time with infant and time in employment as predictors of mother-child relationships and children's early development
Huston, Aletha C.; Aronson, Stacey R.;

A study of the relationship between maternal time with infants and the quality of mother-child relationships and children’s development, based on a sample of 1,053 mothers taken from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care, using time diaries, interviews, and home visit assessments using the Home Observation for Measure of the Environment (HOME) scale

Reports & Papers

2005

Modeling the impacts of child care quality on children's preschool cognitive development
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network; Duncan, Greg J.;

A journal article using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care to evaluate three methods for modeling the effects of child care quality on preschool children's cognitive development

Reports & Papers

2003

The effects of infant child care on infant-mother attachment security: Results of the NICHD Study of Early Child Care
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network;

A study of the relationship between nonmaternal infant child care arrangements and infant and mother attachment security and relationships

Reports & Papers

1997

Child care and children's peer interaction at 24 and 36 months: The NICHD Study of Early Child Care
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network;

A study of how time spent in child care, child care quality, and availability of peers relate to children's peer social competence at 23 and 36 months, using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care

Reports & Papers

2001

Child-care usage and mother-infant ''quality time''
Booth-LaForce, Cathryn L.; Clarke-Stewart, K. Alison; Vandell, Deborah Lowe; McCartney, Kathleen; Owen, Margaret T.;

A study of mother’s time use and mother-infant interaction in families where infants spent more than 30 hours pet week in child care vs. 0 hours per week from birth to age 6 months

Reports & Papers

2002

Before Head Start: Income and ethnicity, family characteristics, child care experiences, and child development
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network;

A study of a large sample of three-year-old children relating ethnic background, three levels of family income, family characteristics and experiences in child care to child development

Reports & Papers

2001

Relations between family predictors and child outcomes: Are they weaker for children in child care?
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network;

An analysis of the mediating effect of nonparental child care on the influence of family factors on infant and toddler cognitive and behavioral development using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care

Reports & Papers

1998

Familial factors associated with the characteristics of nonmaternal care for infants
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network;

An analysis of the familial, social, economic, and psychological factors associated with child care type and quality for infants, using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care

Reports & Papers

1997

Latina women in the United States: Child care preferences and arrangements
Satkowski, Laura; Banik, Rumeli; Roubeni, Sonia;

Child care has become an important setting for children to learn new language and social skills as well as to become familiar with a structured environment in order to ease the transition to formal schooling. Although research examining the relationship between formal child care and behavioral outcomes has shown mixed results, studies have demonstrated that formal child care is associated with positive cognitive and social-emotional outcomes in young children. More specifically, immigrant children (i.e., children who are foreign-born or native-born with one or both parents being foreign-born), who comprise roughly one-quarter of the American population under age 6, can derive benefits from formal child care, such as preparing for formal schooling, learning English, and gaining an understanding of American culture. However, immigrant families are less likely than nonimmigrant families to utilize formal child care for their young children. Latino families may be particularly unlikely to utilize formal child care, but it is unknown whether this choice differs between immigrant and nonimmigrant Latino families. Thus, the aim of the current study was to build on exploratory research and fill a gap in the existing literature through the use of a large sample in order to determine the child care preferences of immigrant and nonimmigrant Latina women and whether social and internal factors contribute to these preferences and arrangements. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

2016

Self and vested interests: Predictors of fathers' views of child care
Moon, Michelle

A study of the relationships between fathers' views of the costs and benefits of child care, anxiety of having their child in child care, and the effects of child care on their children, and their financial need, gender roles, attachment to their careers, and perceptions of their wives' attachment to their careers, based on data from 125 married fathers in southern California with at least one child between the ages of 2 and 6 years

Reports & Papers

February, 2012