Child Care and Early Education Research Connections

Skip to main content

"They are underpaid and understaffed": How clients interpret encounters with street-level bureaucrats

Share
Description:
Scholars have explored the nature and consequences of administrative burden but less is known about how citizens interpret costly encounters with the state. This qualitative study of 85 child care subsidy recipients applies attribution theory from psychology to illustrate how clients develop causal explanations for administrative burden. The findings show that clients either blamed negative experiences on bureaucrats--viewing workers as in control of their behavior, or the bureaucracy--blaming factors related to the subsidy system. In rare instances, clients viewed the bureaucracy as intentionally discouraging claims. We observed some variation by race/ethnicity and study sites. Examining clients' causal explanations of administrative burden helps clarify how clients' interpretation of costly bureaucratic encounters influences future claims, their perceptions of the state, and their political participation. (author abstract)
Resource Type:
Reports & Papers
Country:
United States
State(s):
New York; Illinois

Related resources include summaries, versions, measures (instruments), or other resources in which the current document plays a part. Research products funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation are related to their project records.

- You May Also Like

These resources share similarities with the current selection. They are found by comparing the topic, author, and resource type of the currently selected resource to the rest of the library’s publications.

Equitably financing child care for North Carolina families: Reimbursements to providers play a critical role in child care and early education

Reports & Papersview

Equitably financing child care for North Carolina families: Reimbursements to providers play a critical role in child care and early education

Reports & Papersview

Joint task force on access to quality affordable child care: Report pursuant to House Bill 2346 (2019)

Reports & Papersview