Child Care and Early Education Research Connections

Skip to main content

The demand for teacher characteristics in the market for child care: Evidence from a field experiment

Share
Description:
Many preschool-age children in the U.S. attend center-based child care programs that are of low quality. This paper examines the extent to which teacher qualifications -- widely considered important inputs to classroom quality -- are valued by providers during the hiring process. To do so, we administered a resume audit study in which job-seeker characteristics were randomly assigned to a large number of resumes that were submitted in response to real child care job postings in 14 cities. Our results indicate that center-based providers may not hire the most qualified applicants. For example, we find that although providers have a strong preference for individuals with previous work experience in early childhood education (ECE), those with more ECE experience are less likely to receive an interview than those with less experience. We also find that individuals with bachelor's degrees in ECE are no more likely to receive an interview than their counterparts at the associate's level, even in the market for lead preschool-age teachers. Furthermore, those revealing high levels of academic performance, as measured by grade point average, are generally not preferred by child care providers. Finally, it appears that some non-quality attributes do not influence hiring decisions (e.g., signaling car ownership), while others have large effects on teacher hiring (e.g., applicant race/ethnicity). Together, our findings shed light on the complex trade-offs made by center-based providers attempting to offer high-quality programs while earning sufficient revenue to stay in business. (author abstract)
Resource Type:
Reports & Papers
Country:
United States
State(s):
Washington; Texas; Pennsylvania; New York; Minnesota; Massachusetts; Illinois; Georgia; District of Columbia; California; Arizona

Related resources include summaries, versions, measures (instruments), or other resources in which the current document plays a part. Research products funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation are related to their project records.

- You May Also Like

These resources share similarities with the current selection. They are found by comparing the topic, author, and resource type of the currently selected resource to the rest of the library’s publications.

Early childhood teachers’ self-efficacy and professional support predict work engagement

Reports & Papersview

Job demands and resources experienced by the early childhood education workforce serving high-need populations

Reports & Papersview

Center- and program-level factors associated with turnover in the early childhood education workforce

Reports & Papersview