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Effects of the CCDF subsidy program on the employment outcomes of low income mothers

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Description:
One of the purposes of the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) is to provide parents with child care to enable their work. In FY2014, 1.4 million children (from 853,000 families) received subsidies through this program averaging $4,800 per year. Total spending on direct services was $6.6 billion in FY 2014 (most recent year available). Supporting parental employment remains an important goal of the CCDF, and recent legislative and administrative efforts have also emphasized supporting children's development and improving the quality of its programs. While research generally supports the employment benefits of child care more generally, there are a limited number of studies that have assessed the employment benefits of CCDF-funded child care in particular, and in the United States context. This study aims to fill that gap and provide a contemporary understanding of how CCDF funding and policies influence maternal employment across states. (author abstract)
Resource Type:
Reports & Papers
Country:
United States

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