Child Care and Early Education Research Connections

Skip to main content

Associations between inattention, hyperactivity and pre-reading skills before and after formal reading instruction begins

Share
Description:
Concurrent associations between teacher ratings of inattention, hyperactivity and pre-reading skills were examined in 64 pre-schoolers who had not commenced formal reading instruction and 136 school entrants who were in the first weeks of reading instruction. Both samples of children completed measures of pre-reading skills, namely phonological awareness, phonological memory, rapid naming, and letter name knowledge, as well as a measure of verbal ability. School entrants also completed measures of letter sound knowledge and beginning word identification skills. Teachers completed rating scales of inattention and hyperactivity. In the preschool sample, teacher-rated inattention and hyperactivity were not correlated with measures of children's phonological processing but were correlated with letter name knowledge. In comparison, inattention, but not hyperactivity, was independently related to all measures of school entrants' phonological processing and alphabet knowledge and their knowledge of high frequency words. Structural equation modelling on the school entrant sample revealed that the relationship between inattention and beginning word identification was mediated by pre-reading skills, suggesting that attention problems may compromise reading development during the earliest stages of learning to read through their impact on pre-reading skills. The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for the consideration of inattention in the design of effective and engaging early childhood learning environments. (author abstract)
Resource Type:
Reports & Papers
Country:
Australia

Related resources include summaries, versions, measures (instruments), or other resources in which the current document plays a part. Research products funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation are related to their project records.

- You May Also Like

These resources share similarities with the current selection. They are found by comparing the topic, author, and resource type of the currently selected resource to the rest of the library’s publications.

Exploration of play behaviors in an inclusive preschool setting

Reports & Papersview

Effect of daily school and care disruptions during the COVID-19 pandemic on child behavior problems

Reports & Papersview

Cumulative experience of educational assets from preschool through first grade and the social-emotional well-being of English- and Spanish-speaking children

Reports & Papersview
Release: 'v1.9.0' | Built: 2022-06-13 15:23:18 EDT