Child Care and Early Education Research Connections

Skip to main content

The long-term impacts of low-achieving childhood peers: Evidence from Project STAR

Share
Description:
This paper evaluates how sharing a kindergarten classroom with low-achieving repeaters affects the long-term educational performance of regular first-time kindergarten students. Exploiting random assignment of teachers and students to classes in Project STAR, I document three sets of causal impacts: students who are exposed to repeaters (1) score lower on standardized tests at the end of kindergarten, an effect that fades out in later grades; (2) show persistent improvements in non-cognitive skills such as effort and discipline; and (3) are more likely to graduate from high school and to take a college entrance exam around the age of eighteen. I show that the positive spillovers from repeaters on long-term educational attainment are likely driven by the differential accumulation of non-cognitive skills by repeater-exposed students during childhood. The improvements in these skills are in turn a result of behavioral adjustments by teachers, students, or parents to the presence of low-achieving repeaters in the classroom. (author abstract)
Resource Type:
Reports & Papers
Author(s):
Country:
United States
State(s):
Tennessee

Related resources include summaries, versions, measures (instruments), or other resources in which the current document plays a part. Research products funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation are related to their project records.

- You May Also Like

These resources share similarities with the current selection.

The Chicago School Readiness Project: Examining the long-term impacts of an early childhood intervention

How does your kindergarten classroom affect your earnings?: Evidence from Project STAR

Early Years Peer to Peer Support Programme: Evaluation of effectiveness and impact

Release: 'v1.16.1' | Built: 2022-09-26 15:52:06 EDT