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Related Resource of Resource 26359

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Unpacking the black box of the Chicago School Readiness Project intervention: The mediating roles of teacher-child relationship quality and self-regulation
Jones, Stephanie M.; Bub, Kristen L.; Raver, C. Cybele;

Research Findings: This study examines the theory of change of the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP), testing a sequence of theory-derived mediating mechanisms that include the quality of teacher-child relationships and children's self-regulation. The CSRP is a multicomponent teacher and classroom-focused intervention, and its cluster-randomized efficacy trial was conducted in 35 Head Start-funded classrooms. Practice or Policy: A series of increasingly complex and conservative structural equation models indicate that the CSRP carries its effects on children's academic and behavioral outcomes through changes in teacher-child relationship quality and children's self regulation. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

October, 2013

Does a preschool social and emotional learning intervention pay off for classroom instruction and children's behavior and academic skills?: Evidence from the Foundations of Learning project
Morris, Pamela A.; Millenky, Megan; Raver, C. Cybele; Jones, Stephanie M.

This article tests the hypothesis that children's learning environment will improve through a social and emotional learning (SEL) intervention that provides preschool teachers with new skills to manage children's disruptive behavior by reporting results from the Foundations of Learning (FOL) Demonstration, a place-randomized, experimental evaluation conducted by MDRC. Research Findings: Findings demonstrate that the FOL intervention improved teachers' ability to address children's behavior problems and to provide a positive emotional climate in their classrooms. Importantly, the FOL intervention also improved the number of minutes of instructional time, although the quality of teachers' instruction was not improved. Finally, FOL benefited children's observed behavior in classrooms, with lower levels of conflictual interactions and, at the trend level, higher levels of engagement in classrooms activities, relative to similar students randomly assigned to control classrooms. Practice or Policy: This study is one of an emerging body of research on the efficacy of SEL programs for preschool children living in poverty. Understanding the value-added of these programs (e.g., in increased instructional time and increased classroom engagement) as well as their limitations (e.g., in teachers' instructional quality and children's academic skills) will help us design the next set of more effective interventions for low-income children.

Reports & Papers

October, 2013

Promoting children's social-emotional skills in preschool can enhance academic and behavioral functioning in kindergarten: Findings from Head Start REDI
Nix, Robert L.; Bierman, Karen L.; Domitrovich, Celene E.; Gill, Sukhdeep;

Research Findings: This study examined processes of change associated with the positive preschool and kindergarten outcomes of children who received the Head Start REDI (REsearch-based, Developmentally Informed) intervention compared to usual practice Head Start. Using data from a large-scale randomized controlled trial (N=356 children, 42% African American or Latino, all from low-income families), this study tests the logic model that improving preschool social-emotional skills (e.g., emotion understanding, social problem solving, and positive social behavior) as well as language/emergent literacy skills will promote cross-domain academic and behavioral adjustment after children transition into kindergarten. Validating this logic model, the present study finds that intervention effects on 3 important kindergarten outcomes (e.g., reading achievement, learning engagement, and positive social behavior) were mediated by preschool gains in the proximal social-emotional and language/emergent literacy skills targeted by the REDI intervention. It is important to note that preschool gains in social-emotional skills made unique contributions to kindergarten outcomes in reading achievement and learning engagement, even after we accounted for concurrent preschool gains in vocabulary and emergent literacy skills. Practice or Policy: These findings highlight the importance of fostering at-risk children's social-emotional skills during preschool as a means of promoting school readiness. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

October, 2013

Relations among teachers' emotion socialization beliefs and practices and preschoolers' emotional competence
Morris, Carol A. S.; Denham, Susanne A.; Bassett, Hideko H.; Curby, Timothy W.;

Research Findings: Utilizing a 3-part model of emotion socialization that included modeling, contingent responding, and teaching, this study examined the associations between 44 teachers' self-reported and observed emotion socialization practices and 326 preschoolers' emotion knowledge and observed emotional behavior. Multilevel analyses revealed that the majority of the variance in the children's emotion knowledge scores and observed emotional behavior was predicted by factors within, rather than between, classrooms. Teachers' use of all 3 emotion socialization techniques did contribute to the prediction of the children's scores; however, the nature of these associations differed by children's age and gender. Practice or Policy: The development of children's emotional competence is a complex, multifaceted process in which many interaction partners play a role. Early childhood teachers act as emotion socialization agents for the children in their care by modeling emotions, responding either supportively or punitively to children's expressions of emotions, and engaging in direct instruction regarding emotional experience. This research may provide a basis for potential future interventions designed to assist teachers in developing their own emotion socialization skills so that they can be more effective emotion socialization agents for the children in their care. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

October, 2013

It takes two: Sensitive caregiving across contexts and children's social, emotional, and academic outcomes
Vesely, Colleen K.; Brown, Elizabeth Levine; Mahatmya, Duhita;

Research Findings: Using longitudinal survey data from the Welfare, Children, and Families Study: A Three-City Study (n=135), this study examines how congruence in maternal and child care provider sensitivities contributes to young children's social, emotional, and academic outcomes among low-income minority families. Congruence groups were created based on levels of high and low maternal and child care provider sensitivity. Children with high maternal sensitivity and low child care provider sensitivity had lower scores on measures of social competence and applied problems compared to children with high maternal and child care provider sensitivity. Children with low maternal sensitivity but high child care provider sensitivity displayed higher emotional competence than children with low maternal and child care sensitivity, implying an important protective benefit of child care. Practice or Policy: Current state and federal policy climates, including recently awarded Early Learning Challenge grants focused on social and personal development and the Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning Act, reflect an important emphasis on social and emotional learning. Given this, the findings from this study implicate the role of families and child care providers as important components in any policy or program focused on shaping children's early social and emotional outcomes. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

October, 2013

Introduction to the special issue on social and emotional learning in early education
Rivers, Susan E.; Tominey, Shauna; O'Bryon, Elisabeth C.; Brackett, Marc A.;

An introduction to a special issue of the journal Early Education and Development, featuring articles on the relationships between social and emotional learning (SEL) and both early education programs and child and adult characteristics

Other

October, 2013