Related Resource of Resource 19778

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Result Resource Type Publication Date

Design Phase of the National Study of Child Care Supply and Demand
Datta, A. Rupa; Goerge, Robert; Witte, Ann D.;

A project to develop sampling and methodology options for the National Study of Child Care Supply and Demand, with special focus on low income households with children ages birth through 12 years whose parents are working and receiving cash assistance, transitioning off cash assistance, or at risk of needing cash assistance, and on child care and early education programs and providers serving these focal families. Other deliverables include: (1) literature review; (2) compendium of survey measures; (3) development of survey instruments that address questions of interest from both the demand and supply sides, address the limitations of other data collections efforts in this area of inquiry, and fill a gap in our knowledge; (4) feasibility test of the proposed design and the survey instruments with the populations of interest; and (5) a resource analysis.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects

2007

What can we learn from licensing and other child care provider lists? [PowerPoint]
Datta, A. Rupa;

This PowerPoint presentation accompanies a webinar that examines research possibilities related to the use of child care provider lists. It also addresses the process of acquiring accurate provider counts, presenting an example from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE). Selected analysis ideas are included.

Other

22 August, 2018

What can we learn from licensing and other child care provider lists?
Datta, A. Rupa;

This webinar examines research possibilities related to the use of child care provider lists. It also addresses the process of acquiring accurate provider counts, presenting an example from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE). Selected analysis ideas are included.

Multimedia

22 August, 2018

2019 National Survey of Early Care and Education: State supplement opportunities
NORC;

First, this brochure describes the potential uses of 2019 National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) data in state-specific and multi-state research. Next, it presents a menu of options for states wishing to provide supplemental funding for additional data collection. Lastly, it presents five tables in which states are categorized into sample-size categories of the providers and households in the 2012 NSECE.

Fact Sheets & Briefs

Looking forward to the proposed 2019 National Survey of Early Care and Education overview: A state perspective [PowerPoint]
Datta, A. Rupa;

[PowerPoint presentation] This webinar was recorded on May 24, 2018 and provides an overview of opportunities for additional state participation in the 2019 NSECE, including: supplementing the national data collection sample for their state, provider sample frame supplementation, and state administrative subsidy data linkages. For more information, including a handout that provides more detail, please email nsece@norc.org

Other

24 May, 2018

Looking forward to the proposed 2019 National Survey of Early Care and Education overview: A state perspective
Datta, A. Rupa;

This webinar was recorded on May 24, 2018 and provides an overview of opportunities for additional state participation in the 2019 NSECE, including: supplementing the national data collection sample for their state, provider sample frame supplementation, and state administrative subsidy data linkages. For more information, including a handout that provides more detail, please email nsece@norc.org

Multimedia

24 May, 2018

Looking forward to the proposed 2019 National Survey of Early Care and Education -- An overview [PowerPoint]
Datta, A. Rupa;

[PowerPoint presentation] This pre-recorded webinar outlines the proposed plans for the 2019 NSECE, now including the household and unlisted home-based provider samples, as well as the previously planned listed home-based provider, center-based provider, and center-based workforce samples. It includes an overview of the proposed timeline, research goals, data collection plans, and planned analytic data products.

Other

Looking forward to the proposed 2019 National Survey of Early Care and Education -- An overview
Datta, A. Rupa;

This pre-recorded webinar outlines the proposed plans for the 2019 NSECE, now including the household and unlisted home-based provider samples, as well as the previously planned listed home-based provider, center-based provider, and center-based workforce samples. It includes an overview of the proposed timeline, research goals, data collection plans, and planned analytic data products.

Multimedia

24 July, 2018

Early care and education usage and households' out-of-pocket costs: Tabulations from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

The extensive tables in this document describe four main aspects of households' use of nonparental care: types of care, combinations of types of care, hours of care, and parents' out of pocket costs for care. These aspects are reported by child age, by household characteristics such as the household's income-to-poverty ratio, and by two aspects of the community where the household is located (poverty density and urbanicity). (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

April, 2018

NSECE webinar: Levels of geography in the NSECE [PowerPoint]
Datta, A. Rupa; Gelatt, Julia; Sandstrom, Heather;

The NSECE data files include extensive geographic data about sampled providers and households, the communities in which those providers and households are located, and other characteristics such as distances. The goal of this webinar is to support current and potential users of the NSECE data. It covered: -- what geographic information NSECE has available in different files (e.g. public and restricted-use files) -- possible uses of geographic data to support different types of analyses -- illustrations of sample sizes for state-specific analyses and other levels of geography -- how reporting requirements minimize disclosure risk (i.e. analysis can be conducted at the state level, but only reported at the national level) -- what other resources are available for users interested in using geographic information in the NSECE. (author abstract)

Other

22 February, 2018

NSECE webinar: Levels of geography in the NSECE
Datta, A. Rupa; Milesi, Carolina; Gelatt, Julia;

The NSECE data files include extensive geographic data about sampled providers and households, the communities in which those providers and households are located, and other characteristics such as distances. The goal of this webinar is to support current and potential users of the NSECE data. It covered: -- what geographic information NSECE has available in different files (e.g. public and restricted-use files) -- possible uses of geographic data to support different types of analyses -- illustrations of sample sizes for state-specific analyses and other levels of geography -- how reporting requirements minimize disclosure risk (i.e. analysis can be conducted at the state level, but only reported at the national level) -- what other resources are available for users interested in using geographic information in the NSECE. (author abstract)

Multimedia

15 March, 2018

Parent work schedules in households with young children
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

This research snapshot describes work schedules of parents of young children during a reference week in 2012. We describe how work schedules differ for households of different income levels; between one-parent and two-parent families; and in households where neither, one, or both parents work. One group of particular focus is 'fully-employed' households; these are households where all parents work -- a one-parent/one-worker household or a two-parent/two-worker household. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

August, 2017

PSU and cluster weights user guide
NORC;

This document is relevant for researchers interested in using the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to carry out analysis of local-level interaction of supply and demand of early care and education. This user guide briefly describes key elements of the NSECE sampling methodology, including Primary Sampling Units (PSU) for the household and listed center- based and home-based providers, Secondary Sampling Units (SSU) for the household sample, and the Provider Cluster. The user guide explains how to create PSU- and cluster-level aggregate measures and how to appropriately use PSU and Provider Cluster Weights to generate estimates for sub-national geographic areas.

Other

28 July, 2016

Review of selected studies and professional standards related to the predictors of quality included in the National Survey of Early Care and Education
Madill, Rebecca; Moodie, Shannon; Zaslow, Martha; Tout, Kathryn;

The purpose of this annotated bibliography is to provide reviews of key selected studies and professional standards related to the predictors of quality (POQ) included in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE). The intent is to provide a companion piece to the NSECE methodological report Measuring Predictors of Quality in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE Project Team, 2015). The two reports focus on the same predictors of quality, and follow the same numbering so that readers can easily cross-reference. (author abstract)

Bibliographies

October, 2015

NSECE webinar: Schedules of work and child care in the NSECE [PowerPoint]
Datta, A. Rupa; Milesi, Carolina;

This PowerPoint presentation accompanies a webinar that examines key components of the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) Household Survey, with particular focus on adult calendar data content. It considers research issues regarding parental employment that may be addressed using household calendar data. Examples of basic constructs derived from the adult calendar are presented.

Other

24 May, 2017

NSECE webinar: Schedules of work and child care in the NSECE
Datta, A. Rupa; Milesi, Carolina;

This webinar examines key components of the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) Household Survey, with particular focus on adult calendar data content. It considers research issues regarding parental employment that may be addressed using household calendar data. Examples of basic constructs derived from the adult calendar are presented.

Multimedia

24 May, 2017

How far are early care and education arrangements from children's homes?
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

Distance between a child's home and the location of a provider of early care and education (ECE) is one of the critical factors parents consider in choosing providers (in addition to cost, schedule, quality, and availability). These distances can also inform child care subsidy policies and our understanding of households' access to ECE. This fact sheet uses newly available mapping data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to describe distances between young children's homes and where they receive regular ECE. We provide nationally representative estimates of the distances between families' homes and the regular (5 or more hours per week) nonparental care they use for children 5 years and under. We present estimates separately for infants/toddlers (birth to <3 years old) and preschoolers (3 through 5 years old), different levels of household income-to-poverty ratio, and selected types of ECE providers. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

November, 2016

NSECE webinar: Defining type of care in the NSECE [PowerPoint]
Datta, A. Rupa;

This PowerPoint presentation accompanies a webinar that discusses type of care definitions as related to those used in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) data files, particularly the Household Survey, the Center-Based Provider Survey, and the Home-Based Provider Survey. It presents a brief overview of the NSECE design, which provides researchers with some flexibility in defining type of care for various analyses. Similarities and differences in types of care across data files are also addressed.

Other

26 January, 2017

NSECE webinar: Defining type of care in the NSECE
Datta, A. Rupa;

This webinar discusses type of care definitions as related to those used in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) data files, particularly the Household Survey, the Center-Based Provider Survey, and the Home-Based Provider Survey. It presents a brief overview of the NSECE design, which provides researchers with some flexibility in defining type of care for various analyses. Similarities and differences in types of care across data files are also addressed.

Multimedia

26 January, 2017

Early care and education usage and households' out-of-pocket costs: Tabulations from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

The extensive tables in this document describe four main aspects of households' use of nonparental care: types of care, combinations of types of care, hours of care, and parents' out of pocket costs for care. These aspects are reported by child age, by household characteristics such as the household's income-to-poverty ratio, and by two aspects of the community where the household is located (poverty density and urbanicity). (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

August, 2016

What can we learn about ECE arrangements in the NSECE Household Survey [PowerPoint]
Datta, A. Rupa;

This PowerPoint presentation accompanies a webinar that provides an overview of key arrangement attributes from the National Survey of Early Care and Education Household Survey. Available data include type of care, cost of care, schedule of care, and distance between household and arrangement. Special issues such as school-age children, household-level information, and parent-like relationships are also addressed.

Other

21 October, 2016

What can we learn about ECE arrangements in the NSECE Household Survey
Datta, A. Rupa;

The Household Survey of the National Survey of Early Care and Education includes extensive data about early care and education (ECE) arrangements used by a nationally representative sample of households in winter/spring 2012. Available arrangement-level data include: type of care, location of care, distance of care from the household's residence, cost to parents for the care, and information about the schedule of care used in a reference week. Because multiple arrangements were collected for each child and data are collected for all children under age 13 in the household, data are also available about how many arrangements each child uses, how many children in a household share an arrangement, or how many different providers a household uses. The webinar "What can we learn about ECE arrangements in the NSECE Household Survey" will provide an overview of arrangement-level information in the National Survey of Early Care and Education, including data on geography, cost, type of care, and schedule, and how to match arrangements across providers or children within a household. (author abstract)

Multimedia

21 October, 2016

NSECE documentation of 2011 state-level variation in lists of providers of early care and education
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team; Gibbs, Chloe; Goerge, Robert;

The National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) sample design called for construction of a national sampling frame of early care and education (ECE) center-based and home-based providers. The construction involved both national lists of ECE providers as well as lists collected from state agencies from all 50 states and the District of Columbia. This document specifies the lists, with their definitions, that were collected and incorporated into the NSECE provider sampling frame. Although there is some modest variation across lists for center-based ECE providers, the variation for home-based ECE lists is much greater. The definitions of home-based provider lists are also relevant because of the treatment of home-based ECE within the NSECE design. The NSECE Home-based Provider Survey supports estimates for two home-based provider populations: listed and unlisted. Listed providers are those who appeared on state and national lists gathered to build the national provider sampling frame. The project team collected all home-based provider lists maintained by each state (and the District of Columbia), but the types of lists maintained by each state differed. Some differences in states' list-keeping are due to definitional differences, for example, whether or not there is a 'licensed' or 'registered' status for home-based providers within the state, and some are due to differences in listing policies, for example, whether or not the state maintains lists of exempt providers or those who are receiving CCDF subsidies but have no other interaction with the child care licensing system in that state. This document enumerates for each state its provider definitions and the lists it maintained at the time that the NSECE lists were collected from that state in the spring or summer of 2011. All enumerated lists were included in the NSECE provider frame and home-based providers sampled from those lists are classified as 'listed' in the NSECE Home-based Provider data. (author abstract)

Other

May, 2016

Households' geographic access to center-based early care and education: Estimates and methodology from the National Survey of Early Care and Education
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

This document offers a national picture of selected segments of the early care and education (ECE) market by describing how important attributes of the supply of and the demand for center-based care relate to each other. The document also provides a methodological guide for using newly available data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to study local-level interactions of the supply of and demand for center-based early care and education (ECE) in the United States. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

April, 2016

Design-corrected variance estimation of NSECE statistics
NORC;

This brief describes the sampling techniques used in the collection of statistical data for the National Survey of Early Care & Education (NSECE), and provides information regarding the proper use of weighting to obtain valid inferences for statistics of interest such as percentages, means, totals, ratios, and regression coefficients. Two calculation examples are provided in Stata: a calculation of the total number of children enrolled by single age category, and a calculation of percent of programs by single age category.

Fact Sheets & Briefs

25 February, 2016

Examining child care subsidy receipt: An analysis of matched NSECE and Illinois administrative data
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team; Zanoni, Wladimir; Goerge, Robert; Datta, A. Rupa; Gennetian, Lisa A.; Witte, Ann D.; Brandon, Richard N.; Zaslow, Martha; Milesi, Carolina; Guzman, Lina;

The National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) team undertook an innovative approach to calculate CCDF program participation. Using probabilistic record linkage methods, the household records from the NSECE were matched to CCDF administrative data from the State of Illinois to form a combined database of survey and administrative data. That combined database allowed creation of CCDF program participation variables from NSECE households' over-time records in the childcare subsidies program. The unified database created from this exercise resembles one from a cross-sectional survey that, by asking retrospective questions, identifies households' recent participation in social programs (CCDF, in our case). But the unified database has the advantage of a more accurate participation variable from administrative data than would have been obtained from a survey self-report. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

February, 2016

Characteristics of home-based early care and education providers: Initial findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

About a million paid and an additional 2.7 million unpaid home-based providers are responsible for young children not their own for at least five hours each week. This technical report uses data from the newly available National Survey of Early Care and Education to provide a nationally representative estimate of all home-based care to children ages birth through five years and not yet in kindergarten. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

February, 2016

Digging into the NSECE: Exploiting the potential of the household and provider data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE): Populating the calendar file (CAPI demo)
Datta, A. Rupa;

This video presentation provides a Computer Assisted Personal Interview (CAPI) demo used to capture non-parental child care provision data to populate the calendar file used in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE).

Multimedia

July, 2015

Digging into the NSECE: Exploiting the potential of the household and provider data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE): Prices and cost in the NSECE
Datta, A. Rupa;

This video presentation discusses price and cost definitions as related to those used in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE).

Multimedia

July, 2015

Digging into the NSECE: Exploiting the potential of the household and provider data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE): Age of child in the NSECE
Milesi, Carolina;

This video presentation examines both definition distinctions concerning age of child and types of care used in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE).

Multimedia

July, 2015

Digging into the NSECE: Exploiting the potential of the household and provider data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE): Type of care in the NSECE
Datta, A. Rupa; Connelly, Jill;

This video presentation discusses definitions of specific types of care, along with samples used in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE).

Multimedia

July, 2015

Digging into the NSECE: Exploiting the potential of the household and provider data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE): Using household and provider data to measure enrollment, usage
Datta, A. Rupa;

This video presentation discusses the availability and potential uses of the non-parental care usage and enrollment data found in the National Survey of Early Care and Education's (NSECE) household and provider data files. The following topics are examined: usage definition; types of variables provided; data set usage (household or provider); considerations in choosing a data file; and advantage comparisons to using each dataset.

Multimedia

July, 2015

Identifying Head Start and public pre-k participation in NSECE data on center-based ECE programs
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

The analyses we present in the Technical Report, "Which Centers Participate in Head Start or Public Pre-Kindergarten" characterize centers that have at least one child whose enrollment is funded through Head Start or Public Pre-K funds. This supplement to the technical report provides interested readers with technical details of the analyses (including additional information about tabulations and definitions used, as well as discussion of features of the data that affect how additional analyses might be undertaken). (author abstract)

Other

September, 2015

Which early care and education centers participate in Head Start or public pre-kindergarten?
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

Newly released data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education provide a unique opportunity to understand Head Start and Public Pre-K offerings within the context of all center-based ECE to children age five and under. These two prominent initiatives involve almost 40 percent of all ECE centers nationally. Most centers receiving any Head Start or Public Pre-K funding are also serving young children through other ECE services such as parent-funded preschool. In fact, 25 percent of centers with Head Start (but no Public Pre-K) funding and 45 percent of centers with Public Pre-K (but no Head Start) funding are also supported with private funds. Fewer than one in five centers with Head Start or Public Pre-K funding are operated by a public school district. The NSECE data indicate that ECE centers nationally are a diverse group in terms of size, auspice, mix of public/private funding, and other characteristics; the same can be said for centers receiving any Head Start or Public Pre-K funds. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

September, 2015

Measuring predictors of quality in early care and education settings in the National Survey of Early Care and Education
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

This report, Measuring Predictors of Quality in Early Care and Education Settings in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE), is intended as a methodological report on how selected predictors of quality can be measured using the NSECE data. It also provides descriptive data for each of the selected predictors of quality. Attributes of early care and education settings that contribute to quality are considered at the level of the individual teacher and caregiver, at the level of the classroom or home-based group, and at the level of the center- and home-based program at a single location. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

September, 2015

Household Survey [PowerPoint]
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

This presentation focuses on the Household Survey used in the NSECE. Examined aspects of the survey include data collection, topics covered by the survey, household data, survey respondents, levels of observation, and key differences across the categories of survey files.

Other

2015

Home-Based Provider Survey [PowerPoint]
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

This presentation focuses on the Home-Based Provider Survey used in the NSECE. Examined aspects of the survey include sample sources and classification, data collection, topics covered by the survey, provider data, survey respondents, levels of observation, and key differences across the categories of survey files.

Other

2015

Workforce Survey [PowerPoint]
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

This presentation focuses on the Workforce Survey used in the NSECE. Examined aspects of the survey include data collection, topics covered by the survey, workforce data, survey respondents, levels of observation, and key differences across the categories of survey files.

Other

2015

Center-Based Provider Survey [PowerPoint]
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

This presentation focuses on the Center-Based Provider Survey used in the NSECE. Examined aspects of the survey include data collection, topics covered by the survey, provider data, survey respondents, levels of observation, and key differences across the categories of survey files.

Other

2015

Overall study design and sampling approach [PowerPoint]
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

This tutorial covers the overall study design and sampling approach of the NSECE. Discussion focuses on the sample sources and the four NSECE surveys at the foundation of the NSECE data collection design, including topics such as sample sizes, the use of provider clusters, geographic characteristics available, and the importance of weighting due to the study design.

Other

2015

Data files and documentation [PowerPoint]
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

The slides of this presentation provide information on the structure and use of the dataset of the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE). The data files and documentation are described in detail in this tutorial. The slides will describe the type of variables available in each of the five categories of data files the NSECE will offer: Quick Tabulation, Public Use, Level 1 Restricted-Use Questionnaire, Level 2 Restricted-Use Geographic, and Level 3 Restricted-Use Identifying. In addition, types of documentation and the information they contain is described.

Other

2015

NSECE webinar 2: Key definitions and sample characteristics [PowerPoint]
Bleckman, Johanna; Datta, A. Rupa;

The second webinar uses publicly available documents to explain key definitions and sample characteristics for each of the four main NSECE data files (Household, Home-based ECE Provider, Center-based ECE Provider, classroom-assigned Center-based ECE Workforce). This webinar helps researchers beginning to work with the NSECE data understand some key characteristics of the data before they conduct analyses. (author abstract)

Other

18 May, 2015

NSECE webinar 2: Key definitions and sample characteristics
Bleckman, Johanna; Datta, A. Rupa;

The second webinar uses publicly available documents to explain key definitions and sample characteristics for each of the four main NSECE data files (Household, Home-based ECE Provider, Center-based ECE Provider, classroom-assigned Center-based ECE Workforce). This webinar helps researchers beginning to work with the NSECE data understand some key characteristics of the data before they conduct analyses. (author abstract)

Multimedia

18 May, 2015

NSECE webinar 1: Study design, sampling, and public release of the National Survey of Early Care and Education [PowerPoint]
Bleckman, Johanna; Datta, A. Rupa;

This set of powerpoint slides accompanies a webinar on the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE), which presents an overview of the study design, a guide to the study's data files, a guide to data file documentation, and a description of the key features of each of the four main NSECE surveys, namely the household, home-based providers, center-based providers, and classroom-assigned center-based workforce surveys.

Other

08 May, 2015

Prices charged in early care and education: Initial findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

This brief uses data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to describe prices charged by center- and home-based providers of early care and education (ECE), as well as the incidence of care that is free to all parents. These data come from both the NSECE Center-Based Provider Survey and the NSECE Home-Based Provider Survey; external data sources were used to classify the locations of the sampled providers. This brief describes the maximum price of full-time care, without any subsidies, that providers were charging families in 2012 (when NSECE interviews were carried out). This "market price" for care is the type of data commonly collected in Market Rate Studies required by the Child Care Development Fund. It is related to, but can be quite different from, the cost of care to parents and providers' costs for providing care. The brief also reports the percent of providers, such as Head Start and publicly funded pre-K programs that provide care free to all the families they serve. In addition to providing national information, we examine how prices and availability of free care vary by community characteristics such as poverty and urbanicity. For center-based programs, we also examine variation by receipt of public funding. In the next section of the brief we describe the NSECE and other data sources for this analysis. We then present estimates for the prevalence of care that is free to all parents, and, for those programs that do charge for care, the distribution of prices for center-based programs. Home-based estimates of these two items follow. We conclude the brief with discussion of the presented estimates and suggestions for further research. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

March, 2015

NSECE webinar 1: Study design, sampling, and public release of the National Survey of Early Care and Education
Bleckman, Johanna; Datta, A. Rupa;

This webinar on the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) presents an overview of the study design, a guide to the study's data files, a guide to data file documentation, and a description of the key features of each of the four main NSECE surveys, namely the household, home-based providers, center-based providers, and classroom-assigned center-based workforce surveys.

Multimedia

08 May, 2015

Who is providing home-based early care and education?
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

This fact sheet provides the first nationally representative portrait of home-based providers of early care and education using data from the newly available National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE). We describe individuals who care for other people's children, age five and under, in home-based settings. Key characteristics we report include the numbers of such providers, numbers of children cared for, whether providers are paid/unpaid for care, and what if any prior personal relationships existed between providers and the children they care for. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

April, 2015

Provision of early care and education during non-standard hours
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

Affordability is one of the critical barriers to accessing early care and education (ECE) for many parents and guardians of young children. Another is finding ECE for the days and hours needed. This is particularly true for the many parents and guardians who do not work during "standard" work hours--i.e., 8am to 6pm, Monday through Friday--but who work evenings, overnight shifts, on the weekends, or have varying work schedules that change from week to week or month to month. This fact sheet uses data from the newly available National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to describe the flexibility of available ECE in the U.S. Specifically, we provide nationally representative estimates of the percentage of ECE providers serving young children (aged birth through 5 years) who offer services during non-standard hours as well as those who permit parents flexibility in scheduling and in payment for services. Estimates are presented separately for center-based providers as well as three types of home-based providers: 'listed' providers who appear in official state and national lists of ECE services; 'unlisted, paid' providers who are not on official lists but receive payment for caring for children; and 'unlisted, unpaid' providers who are not on official lists and do not receive payment for the care they provide. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

April, 2015

Characteristics of center-based early care and education programs
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

This fact sheet provides the first nationally representative portrait of center-based early care and education (ECE) in more than 20 years, using data from the newly available National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE). We describe ECE programs that serve children age birth to five years, not yet in kindergarten. Key characteristics include enrollment size, ages of children served, revenue sources, auspice and hours of operation. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

November, 2014

Characteristics of center-based early care and education programs: Initial findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

In this report we exploit newly available data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to construct the first nationally representative estimates of all center-based care to children birth through age five years, not yet in kindergarten. We describe center-based early care and education (ECE) programs by such key characteristics as enrollment size, ages of children served, revenue sources, auspice and sponsorship and hours of operation. We also provide national estimates of total children enrolled in these programs. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

November, 2014

Household search for and perceptions of early care and education
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

What do families think of different types of early care and education (ECE) such as center-based programs or care by relatives? How do families search for ECE for their young children? This fact sheet reports preliminary findings from the newly available NSECE Household Survey to provide insight into how parents perceive the ECE arrangements available to them, how and why they search for care, and when searches result in a change in arrangement. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

October, 2014

Household search for and perceptions of early care and education: Initial findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

This brief uses new, nationally representative data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)--funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services--to describe critical elements in the decision-making process of parents and other caregivers regarding the nonparental care of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. The NSECE is comprised of four nationally representative surveys that were conducted in 2012. These coordinated surveys were designed to provide in-depth data on multiple dimensions of early care and education (ECE) in the United States, including the availability of ECE, preferences and needs for ECE and school-age care, the use of ECE and school-age care, and a description of the ECE workforce. One of the four surveys--the Household Survey--gathered data from households with young children, while the other three collected data from center-and home-based ECE providers. The NSECE oversampled from low-income areas because the experiences of low-income families are of critical public policy interest. This brief uses data from the Household Survey to provide insight into how parents perceive the ECE arrangements available to them, how and why they search for care, and when searches result in a change in arrangement. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

October, 2014

National Survey of Early Care and Education: Summary data collection and sampling methodology
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

An overview of the sample design and data collection of the National Survey of Early Care and Education, a study of the availability and utilization of early care and education in the United States

Other

October, 2013

Number and characteristics of early care and education (ECE) teachers and caregivers: Initial findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)
National Survey of Early Care and Education Project Team;

Findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education, a study of the availability and utilization of early care and education in the United States, that examine workforce size, program sponsorship, educational attainment, wages, health insurance, and years of experience, based on questionnaires from more than 10,000 center- and home-based providers

Reports & Papers

October, 2013

National Survey of Early Care & Education: Workforce [Classroom Staff] Questionnaire (Rev. ed.)
NORC;

Instruments

28 November, 2011

National Survey of Early Care & Education: Household Questionnaire (Rev. ed.)
NORC;

Instruments

28 November, 2011

National Survey of Early Care & Education: Household Screener (Rev. ed.)
NORC;

Instruments

28 November, 2011

National Survey of Early Care & Education: Home-Based Provider Questionnaire (Rev. ed.)
NORC;

Instruments

28 November, 2011

National Survey of Early Care & Education: Center-Based Provider Screener (Rev. ed.)
NORC;

Instruments

28 November, 2011

National Survey of Early Care & Education: Center-Based Provider Questionnaire (Rev. ed.)
NORC;

Instruments

28 November, 2011