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Child care subsidies under the CCDF program: An overview of policy differences across states and territories as of October 1, 2016
Tran, Victoria; Minton, Sarah; Haldar, Sweta; Giannarelli, Linda;

Within the federal guidelines, States/Territories have the discretion to establish many of the detailed policies used to operate their CCDF programs. In this brief, we present some of the policy differences across the States and Territories. The policies are taken from the CCDF Policies Database, a project funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation within the Administration for Children and Families. The CCDF Policies Database tracks State/Territory policies over time, with hundreds of variables tracking policies related to: - family eligibility - application and wait list procedures - family copayments - provider reimbursement rates - other provider policies This brief serves as a companion piece to the 2016 Book of Tables, providing a graphic overview of some of the policy differences across States/Territories. We describe and present policies related to: - eligibility requirements - family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination - family payments - policies for providers Finally, we provide information about additional resources from the CCDF Policies Database. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

January, 2018

The CCDF policies database book of tables: Key cross-state variations in CCDF policies as of October 1, 2016
Minton, Sarah; Blatt, Lorraine; Tran, Victoria; Stevens, Kathryn; Giannarelli, Linda;

This Book of Tables presents key aspects of the differences in CCDF-funded programs across all 50 States, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands as of October 1, 2016. Additionally, highlights of policy changes between 2015 and 2016 are included throughout this report. October 1 was chosen as the focus date because it is the start of the federal fiscal year, consistent with the focus date of the triennial CCDF Plans (previously biennial), and consistent with the starting date of the annual period covered by ACF's administrative data (ACF-800 -- Annual Aggregate Child Care Data Report and ACF-801 -- Monthly Child Care Data Report). This Book of Tables includes 41 tables across four general areas of policy (see the Table of Tables at the beginning of this report for more information): - Eligibility requirements for families and children (tables 1 through 16) - Family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination (tables 17 through 24) - Family payments (tables 25 through 32) - Policies for providers, including maximum reimbursement rates (tables 33 through 41) The information in the tables is taken from the CCDF Policies Database, a cross-state, cross-time database of CCDF policy information funded by HHS/ACF/OPRE. The information in the Database, and thus the information in the tables, is based primarily on the documents caseworkers use as they work with families and providers (often termed "caseworker manuals"). The caseworker manuals generally provide more detailed information on eligibility, family payments, and provider-related policies than is included in the CCDF Plan documents submitted by States/Territories to ACF. The caseworker manuals also provide ongoing detail for periods in between CCDF Plan submission dates. The Database includes some of the policy variations that exist within States/Territories, and it includes policy details beyond those that appear in this Book of Tables. Readers interested in that level of information may obtain the full Database detail. (author abstract)

Other

December, 2017

The Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Policies Database [Interactive tool]
Urban Institute;

This resource is an interactive online tool with individual state information. Users can create custom datasets of Child Care and Development (CCDF) policies by selecting a variety of policy categories and policy variables in one or more states/territories, by date and level. A search tool tutorial is also available.

Other

Child care subsidies under the CCDF program: An overview of policy differences across states and territories as of October 1, 2015
Stevens, Kathryn; Blatt, Lorraine; Minton, Sarah;

Within the federal guidelines, States/Territories have the discretion to establish many of the detailed policies used to operate their CCDF programs. In this brief, we present some of the policy differences across the States and Territories. The policies are taken from the CCDF Policies Database, a project funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation within the Administration for Children and Families. The CCDF Policies Database tracks State/Territory policies over time, with hundreds of variables tracking policies related to: - family eligibility - application and wait list procedures - family copayments - provider reimbursement rates - other provider policies This brief serves as a companion piece to the 2015 Book of Tables, providing a graphic overview of some of the policy differences across States/Territories. We describe and present policies related to: - eligibility requirements - family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination - family payments - policies for providers Finally, we provide information about additional resources from the CCDF Policies Database. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

June, 2017

The CCDF policies database book of tables: Key cross-state variations in CCDF policies as of October 1, 2015
Stevens, Kathryn; Minton, Sarah; Blatt, Lorraine; Giannarelli, Linda;

This report describes the policies that States and Territories use in operating child care subsidy systems under the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). Across the country and in five outlying areas, CCDF provides federal money to States, Territories, and Tribes to subsidize the cost of child care for lower-income families. Detailed policies vary widely across jurisdictions. This report--the sixth in a series--focuses on the CCDF policies that were in place in October 2015, using data from the CCDF Policies Database. The CCDF Policies Database project produces a comprehensive, up-to-date database of CCDF policies for the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Territories and outlying areas. The Database contains hundreds of variables designed to capture CCDF policies across time, allowing users to access policy information for a specific point in time as well as to see how and when policies change over time. The Database is funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) and maintained by the Urban Institute. The information in the Database, and thus the information in the tables, is based primarily on the documents that caseworkers use as they work with families and providers (often termed "caseworker manuals"). The initial set of manuals coded for the Database reflected policies in effect on or before October 1, 2009. Ongoing manual updates have been collected since that point in order to capture policy changes when they occur in each State/Territory. Each year the project produces a set of tables, containing selected policies from the Database (the full Database detail is also made available for public use). The tables are then reviewed by State/Territory administrators and verified for accuracy. The final tables are included in an annual report, with the current report showing the policies in effect on October 1, 2015. The information provided in the Book of Tables covers four general areas of policy: eligibility requirements for families and children; family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination; family payments; and policies for providers, including maximum reimbursement rates. (author abstract)

Other

November, 2016

Implications of Child Care and Development Block Grant reauthorization for state policies: Changes to requirements for ongoing eligibility
Minton, Sarah; Stevens, Kathryn; Blatt, Lorraine;

When a family qualifies for subsidized child care, that qualification is not open-ended; a family is certified to receive the subsidy for only a certain period of time, during which they must continue to meet eligibility criteria and are often required by States/Territories to report interim changes in circumstances. In most places, the redetermination period has usually been set at either 6 or 12 months, with families sometimes losing subsidies during the period due to changes in circumstances affecting their eligibility. The establishment of these policies was previously left up to the States and Territories. Now, the reauthorization of the legislation that governs federally-funded child care subsidies has put in place a national-level policy requiring redetermination periods of at least 12 months, with related rules covering situations when income increases or families experience other changes that affect eligibility. States and Territories will need to change their policies to meet the new federal requirements. (author abstract)

Other

April, 2016

Implications of Child Care and Development Block Grant reauthorization for state policies: Changes to requirements for legally unregulated child care providers
Minton, Sarah; Stevens, Kathryn; Blatt, Lorraine;

Families receiving federally-funded child care subsidies are free to choose from a broad range of types of child care. Families can choose a child care center or family child care home-the most common types of child care subsidized with federal money. But in most places, families can also choose a less-formal type of care, such as having a relative or neighbor care for the child. These less-formal types of care are typically "license-exempt", meaning that the people providing care have to comply with relatively few regulations. Now, with the recent reauthorization of the main federal program that funds child care subsidies, the federal government is applying new requirements to license-exempt child care providers receiving subsidy funds. (author abstract)

Other

April, 2016

Implications of Child Care and Development Block Grant reauthorization for state policies: Changes to job search policies
Stevens, Kathryn; Minton, Sarah; Blatt, Lorraine;

The recent reauthorization of the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act will create some major changes in how States and Territories provide child care subsidies to low-income families. This brief focuses on just one change, the extent to which subsidies are available to parents who are looking for work. Before the reauthorization, most but not all States/Territories provided some level of job search eligibility. Now, the States/Territories that have not allowed this type of eligibility may have to add it, and even States/Territories that already allow some eligibility for job search may have to make changes in their policies to comply with the new law. (author abstract)

Other

April, 2016

Researching the CCDF program by linking administrative data with data from the CCDF Policies Database: A how-to guide
Giannarelli, Linda; Minton, Sarah; Durham, Christin;

All U.S. States and Territories receive money from the federal government's Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) to operate child care subsidy programs, but each State and Territory has broad discretion in setting specific policies for their individual programs. Which families are eligible to receive subsidies, how much they must pay out-of-pocket, and how much providers will be paid are all policies that vary significantly by state and even by county and locality. This raises an important question for people interested in CCDF-funded programs: What do these policy differences mean for the parents and children served by subsidized child care and for the people providing the child care services? This brief presents an example of how to answer these questions--by linking case-level information on subsidized families and children with detailed policy information from the federally-funded CCDF Policies Database. We illustrate this approach using a specific policy question--whether State/Territory policy choices appear related to the extent to which children with CCDF subsidies receive care from legally unregulated providers. However, our focus is not on the research results--which are intended to be illustrative rather than definitive--but rather on the process for this type of analysis. Linking administrative data with policy data has great potential for exploring the impacts of policy variations, and the CCDF Policies Database provides a rich source of policy data to use in these types of analyses. (author abstract)

Other

April, 2016

The CCDF policies database book of tables: Key cross-state variations in CCDF policies as of October 1, 2014
Minton, Sarah; Stevens, Kathryn; Blatt, Lorraine; Durham, Christin;

This report describes the policies that States and Territories use in operating child care subsidy systems under the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). Across the country and in five outlying areas, CCDF provides federal money to States, Territories, and Tribes to subsidize the cost of child care for lower-income families. Detailed policies vary widely across jurisdictions. This report-the fifth in a series-focuses on the CCDF policies that were in place in October 2014, using data from the CCDF Policies Database. The CCDF Policies Database project produces a comprehensive, up-to-date database of CCDF policies for the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Territories and outlying areas. The Database contains hundreds of variables designed to capture CCDF policies across time, allowing users to access policy information for a specific point in time as well as to see how and when policies change over time. The Database is funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) and maintained by the Urban Institute. The information in the Database, and thus the information in the tables, is based primarily on the documents that caseworkers use as they work with families and providers (often termed "caseworker manuals"). An initial set of manuals was coded for the Database, reflecting policies in effect on or before October 1, 2009. Ongoing manual updates are collected in order to capture policy changes when they occur in each State/Territory. Each year the project produces a set of tables, containing selected policies from the Database (full Database files are also made available for public use). The tables are then reviewed by State/Territory administrators and verified for accuracy. The final tables are included in an annual report, with the current report showing the policies in effect on October 1, 2014. The information provided in the Book of Tables covers four general areas of policy: eligibility requirements for families and children; family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination; family payments; and policies for providers, including maximum reimbursement rates. (author abstract)

Other

October, 2015

Effective analysis of the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) administrative data
Bleckman, Johanna; Aschaffenburg, Karen;

This webinar describes the public CCDF Administrative Data Series, it explains how to use the data, and it reviews the ACF-801 data reporting requirements. Several concrete research questions with an analytic strategy are discussed. Finally, an effective research/analysis process is summarized.

Multimedia

15 August, 2012

Using the RC website and the CCDF Policies Database
Gottesman, David; Lawrence, Sharmila; Giannarelli, Linda; Minton, Sarah; Durham, Christin;

This webinar provides virtual tours and examples of the use of the Child Care & Early Education Research Connections (RC) Web site and the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Policies Database.

Multimedia

September, 2012

Using the CCDF Policies Database in child care research [Powerpoint]
Dwyer, Kathleen M.; Giannarelli, Linda; Durham, Christin; Minton, Sarah;

This is a powerpoint presentation from a webinar that outlines the ways in which the Child Care Development Fund (CCDF) Policies Database can be used to inform research and policymaking. It also provides practical examples and instructions for its use.

Other

21 March, 2013

Using the CCDF Policies Database in child care research
Dwyer, Kathleen M.; Giannarelli, Linda; Durham, Christin; Minton, Sarah;

This webinar outlines the ways in which the Child Care Development Fund (CCDF) Policies Database can be used to inform research and policymaking. It also provides practical examples and instructions for its use.

Multimedia

21 March, 2013

The CCDF policies database book of tables: Key cross-state variations in CCDF policies as of October 1, 2013
Minton, Sarah; Durham, Christin; Giannarelli, Linda;

This report describes the policies that States and Territories use in operating child care subsidy systems under the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). Across the country and in five outlying areas, CCDF provides federal money to States, Territories, and Tribes to subsidize the cost of child care for lower-income families. Detailed policies vary widely across jurisdictions. The CCDF Policies Database project produces a comprehensive, up-to-date database of CCDF policies for the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Territories and outlying areas. The Database contains hundreds of variables designed to capture CCDF policies across time, allowing users to access policy information for a specific point in time as well as to see how and when policies change over time. The Database is funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation and maintained by the Urban Institute. The information in the Database, and thus the information in the tables, is based primarily on the documents that caseworkers use as they work with families and providers (often termed "caseworker manuals"). An initial set of manuals was coded for the Database, reflecting policies in effect on or before October 1, 2009. Ongoing manual updates are collected in order to capture policy changes when they occur in each State/Territory. Each year the project produces a set of tables, containing selected policies from the Database (full Database files are also made available for public use). The tables are then reviewed by State/Territory administrators and verified for accuracy. The final tables are included in an annual report, with the current report showing the policies in effect on October 1, 2013. The information provided in the Book of Tables covers four general areas of policy: eligibility requirements for families and children; family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination; family payments; and policies for providers, including maximum reimbursement rates. (author abstract)

Other

October, 2014

The CCDF policies database book of tables: Key cross-state variations in CCDF policies as of October 1, 2012
Minton, Sarah; Durham, Christin; Huber, Erika; Giannarelli, Linda;

A comparison of aspects of Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)-related policies among the 50 states, District of Columbia, and territories, including: eligibility requirements for families and children; application, redetermination, terms of authorization, and waiting lists; family payments; and policies for providers, including reimbursement rates.

Other

October, 2013

The CCDF policies database book of tables: Key cross-state variations in CCDF policies as of October 1, 2011
Minton, Sarah; Durham, Christin; Huber, Erika; Giannarelli, Linda;

A comparison of aspects of Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)-related policies among the 50 states, District of Columbia, and territories, including: eligibility requirements for families and children; application, redetermination, terms of authorization, and waiting lists; family payments; and policies for providers, including reimbursement rates

Other

October, 2012

The CCDF policies database book of tables: Key cross-state variations in CCDF policies as of October 1, 2009
Minton, Sarah; Durham, Christin; Giannarelli, Linda;

A comparison of aspects of Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) policies among the the 50 states, District of Columbia, and territories, including: (1) eligibility requirements for families and children; (2) application, redetermination, terms of authorization, and waiting lists; (3) family payments; (4) policies for providers, including reimbursement rates; and (5) administration and quality development

Other

August, 2011