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Identifying and exploring profiles of home-based child care providers based on their beliefs and practices

This series of studies seeks to broaden the understanding of the diverse home-based child care provider workforce through identifying categories of providers based on their beliefs about caregiving and their practices with children and families. Seven million children from birth to five receive care in home-based child care settings. However, relatively little is known about characteristics of home-based providers and how to effectively engage them in quality improvement initiatives. Through secondary analysis of the National Survey of Early Care and Education data on listed home-based providers, latent profile analysis is used to explore how providers group into profiles based on key characteristics related to their beliefs and practices, as well as additional provider characteristics that predict profile membership. A similar strategy is used to analyze a sample of licensed and unlicensed home-based providers in Delaware based on the results of a statewide survey. Finally, a multiple case study approach is used to further explore providers in each profile, specifically considering how they view their roles and the quality of the care they provide and to better understand their practices with children and families. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

Spring 2017

How common are nonstandard work schedules among low-income Hispanic parents of young children?

This brief draws on survey and retrospective calendar data from the 2012 National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to describe the work schedules of low-income Hispanic parents with young children from birth to age 5 (not yet in kindergarten), and provide comparison data for their non-Hispanic white and black counterparts. We calculate the percentages of low-income Hispanic children with parents working standard weekday, early morning, evening, overnight, and/or weekend hours. We also examine the percentage of children whose parents have short advance notice (one week or less) of their work hours, which has been shown to complicate parents' efforts to arrange child care and maintain family routines. Importantly, we report estimates separately for children in single- and two-parent households, as families' ECE needs, preferences, and options vary depending on the number of parents in the home. We additionally look at differences among Hispanic children by household nativity status. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

November, 2017

How parental preferences and subsidy receipt shape immigrant families' child care choices

We analyze data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to (1) document the parental preferences and child care arrangements of immigrant families with young children; (2) determine the factors that predict immigrant families' child care settings, including the relative roles of parental preferences for different care types, family characteristics, employment characteristics, the local community context, and local child care marketplace characteristics; (3) identify the state subsidy policies that promote subsidy participation among eligible immigrant families, and (4) estimate how much subsidy receipt facilitates access to regulated care settings for potentially eligible immigrant families. In this brief, we review our research questions and methods and then focus on the challenges and questions that arise when using secondary data to look at early care and education experiences of immigrant households, with implications for future research. (author abstract)

Other

Child care choices of low-income, immigrant families with young children: Findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education

In this brief, we explore differences in the child care settings foreign-born, US-born, LEP, and English-proficient parents select for their young children. We also explore differences in their child care preferences and perceptions and in the household characteristics that might explain their patterns. In this way, we shed light on how being an immigrant and having limited English proficiency, among other factors, might influence parents' interest in and ability to access different child care. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

November, 2017

Parent work schedules in households with young children

This research snapshot describes work schedules of parents of young children during a reference week in 2012. We describe how work schedules differ for households of different income levels; between one-parent and two-parent families; and in households where neither, one, or both parents work. One group of particular focus is 'fully-employed' households; these are households where all parents work -- a one-parent/one-worker household or a two-parent/two-worker household. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

August, 2017

How well are early care and education providers who serve Hispanic children doing on access and availability?

After decades of lagging behind, Latino children--including those who are low-income--are enrolling in ECE programs at rates approaching those of their low-income white peers, at least among preschool-aged children. However, we still know little about the providers of ECE programs (both formal and informal) that care for and serve Latino children. Given the increasing enrollment of Hispanic children in ECE programs, what do the programs that serve this population look like? This brief provides a national portrait of providers serving a large proportion of Hispanic children, focusing on characteristics that shape access to and availability of ECE programs. We find that roughly one in five providers serve a high proportion of Hispanic children (also referred to as high-Hispanic-serving), in which 25 percent or more of the children enrolled are Hispanic. Collectively, our findings suggest many ways in which providers--and home-based providers in particular--are likely responding to the needs of Hispanic families, as well as possible areas of unmet need. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

October, 2017

PSU and cluster weights user guide

This document is relevant for researchers interested in using the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to carry out analysis of local-level interaction of supply and demand of early care and education. This user guide briefly describes key elements of the NSECE sampling methodology, including Primary Sampling Units (PSU) for the household and listed center- based and home-based providers, Secondary Sampling Units (SSU) for the household sample, and the Provider Cluster. The user guide explains how to create PSU- and cluster-level aggregate measures and how to appropriately use PSU and Provider Cluster Weights to generate estimates for sub-national geographic areas.

Other

28 July, 2016

Designing family-friendly consumer education on child care

Consumer education efforts are undergoing revisions in response to provisions in the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 and the 2016 Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) final rule. Specifically, each State must maintain a website that contains information about child care providers in the State or local area, results of providers' monitoring and inspection reports (including health and safety violations), and lists of resources for parents, including financial assistance. This brief provides research-based information to support state agency staff as they design and implement these websites and other resources, such as quality rating and improvement systems (QRISs). (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

June, 2017

Underpaid and unequal: Racial wage disparities in the early childhood workforce

This study discusses the low wages of the early childhood workforce, examines racial disparities in wages and workforce supports based on data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education, and provides recommendations.

Reports & Papers

August, 2016

Centers serving high percentages of young Hispanic children compare favorably to other centers on key predictors of quality

In this brief, we use recent national data to better understand the predictors of quality of ECE centers that serve significant numbers of low-income Hispanic children from birth through age 5. We compare ECE centers serving a high proportion of Hispanic children with ECE centers serving a low proportion of Hispanic children to see how they differ on various predictors of quality. We draw upon data from the 2012 National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE), which was designed to assess several predictors of quality. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

June, 2017

NSECE webinar: Schedules of work and child care in the NSECE

This webinar examines key components of the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) Household Survey, with particular focus on adult calendar data content. It considers research issues regarding parental employment that may be addressed using household calendar data. Examples of basic constructs derived from the adult calendar are presented.

Multimedia

24 May, 2017

Factors associated with reduced expulsion in center-based early learning settings: Preliminary findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)

This brief provides new national estimates of recent early childhood expulsion rates in a range of center-based early learning settings using data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE), indicating how characteristics of early care and education (ECE) centers relate to the likelihood that children are denied services due to behavior. The analysis describes how access to comprehensive services, support for professional development for ECE teachers and staff, funding source (e.g., Head Start, public pre-K, private, etc.), and program sponsorship (e.g., non-profit, government sponsored, for-profit, etc.) relate to recent expulsion rates. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

06 January, 2017

How far are early care and education arrangements from children's homes?

Distance between a child's home and the location of a provider of early care and education (ECE) is one of the critical factors parents consider in choosing providers (in addition to cost, schedule, quality, and availability). These distances can also inform child care subsidy policies and our understanding of households' access to ECE. This fact sheet uses newly available mapping data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to describe distances between young children's homes and where they receive regular ECE. We provide nationally representative estimates of the distances between families' homes and the regular (5 or more hours per week) nonparental care they use for children 5 years and under. We present estimates separately for infants/toddlers (birth to <3 years old) and preschoolers (3 through 5 years old), different levels of household income-to-poverty ratio, and selected types of ECE providers. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

November, 2016

NSECE webinar: Defining type of care in the NSECE

This webinar discusses type of care definitions as related to those used in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) data files, particularly the Household Survey, the Center-Based Provider Survey, and the Home-Based Provider Survey. It presents a brief overview of the NSECE design, which provides researchers with some flexibility in defining type of care for various analyses. Similarities and differences in types of care across data files are also addressed.

Multimedia

26 January, 2017

Hispanic children's participation in early care and education: Parents' perceptions of care arrangements, and relatives' availability to provide care

We examined parents' perceptions of different types of child care arrangements and whether relatives (and other adults living with them) are available to provide care to those parents' children. More specifically, using data from the 2012 National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE), we assessed how Hispanic parents' (with children between zero and 5) perceptions of various types of early care arrangements--center-based, home-based, non-relative, and relative care --differ from those of their white and black counterparts. We looked at these parents' perceptions regardless of whether their children were in care, or the type of care they used. We also considered how the availability of relatives and other adults who might provide care for young children differs across Hispanic, black, and white households and by household poverty level. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

November, 2016

Hispanic children's participation in early care and education: Amount and timing of hours by household nativity status, race/ethnicity, and child age

In this brief, we use publicly available data from the 2012 National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to describe the amount and timing of hours that young Hispanic children from low-income households spend in ECE settings, distinguishing care that takes place during standard weekday hours from care that occurs during nonstandard times (i.e., evening, nighttime, and weekend hours). We focus on low-income households because the challenges of coordinating parental employment and the care of young children are most acute for families with limited economic resources. Low-income families are therefore the primary target of policy efforts and public investments to improve ECE access, use, and quality. Hispanic families represent a growing policy-relevant population, with more than two thirds of young Hispanic children living in low-income households. Households' ECE needs, preferences, and available options may vary by family members' demographic characteristics or child age. We report separate estimates for Latino children in immigrant households and those living with U.S.-born adults only, and provide comparison data for young non-Hispanic white and black children from low-income households. We also examine patterns of ECE schedule characteristics separately for infants and toddlers (younger than age 3), and preschoolers (3 to 5 years). (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

November, 2016

Hispanic children's participation in early care and education: Type of care by household nativity status, race/ethnicity, and child age

In this brief, we provide a national snapshot of ECE participation among low-income Hispanic households. We use publicly available data from the 2012 National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to describe the percentage of young children in low-income Hispanic households who are in non-parental care on a regular basis (more than 5 hours per week), and the different types of settings they experience. ECE is broadly defined in this analysis to include the full range of home- and center- based arrangements children experience when not in the care of their parents. We focus on low-income households because the challenges of coordinating parental employment and the care of young children are most acute for families with limited economic resources. Low-income families are therefore the primary target of policy efforts and public investments to improve ECE access, utilization, and quality. Households' ECE needs, preferences, and available options may vary by family members' demographic characteristics and/or child age. Thus, we report separate estimates for Hispanic children in immigrant households (i.e., including at least one foreign-born adult) and those living with U.S.-born adults only, and provide comparison data for young non-Hispanic white and black children from low-income households. We also examine ECE participation patterns separately for infants and toddlers (younger than age 3), and preschoolers (3 to 5 years). (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

November, 2016

Early care and education usage and households' out-of-pocket costs: Tabulations from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)

The extensive tables in this document describe four main aspects of households' use of nonparental care: types of care, combinations of types of care, hours of care, and parents' out of pocket costs for care. These aspects are reported by child age, by household characteristics such as the household's income-to-poverty ratio, and by two aspects of the community where the household is located (poverty density and urbanicity). (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

August, 2016

Quality jobs, quality child care: The case for a well-paid, diverse early education workforce

This report focuses on achieving quality ECE by ensuring that its workforce is well-compensated, appropriately educated, diverse, and culturally competent. It looks particularly at strategies for maintaining diversity while transforming the industry so that it provides quality jobs and quality care, with a focus in this report on center-based and school-based care. This report recommends a multi-pronged strategy for strengthening early care and education, including increased public funding, new definitions of quality in ECE that include workforce compensation and diversity, expanded workforce development programs and career pathways, and policies to promote salary parity. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

13 June, 2016

NSECE documentation of 2011 state-level variation in lists of providers of early care and education

The National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) sample design called for construction of a national sampling frame of early care and education (ECE) center-based and home-based providers. The construction involved both national lists of ECE providers as well as lists collected from state agencies from all 50 states and the District of Columbia. This document specifies the lists, with their definitions, that were collected and incorporated into the NSECE provider sampling frame. Although there is some modest variation across lists for center-based ECE providers, the variation for home-based ECE lists is much greater. The definitions of home-based provider lists are also relevant because of the treatment of home-based ECE within the NSECE design. The NSECE Home-based Provider Survey supports estimates for two home-based provider populations: listed and unlisted. Listed providers are those who appeared on state and national lists gathered to build the national provider sampling frame. The project team collected all home-based provider lists maintained by each state (and the District of Columbia), but the types of lists maintained by each state differed. Some differences in states' list-keeping are due to definitional differences, for example, whether or not there is a 'licensed' or 'registered' status for home-based providers within the state, and some are due to differences in listing policies, for example, whether or not the state maintains lists of exempt providers or those who are receiving CCDF subsidies but have no other interaction with the child care licensing system in that state. This document enumerates for each state its provider definitions and the lists it maintained at the time that the NSECE lists were collected from that state in the spring or summer of 2011. All enumerated lists were included in the NSECE provider frame and home-based providers sampled from those lists are classified as 'listed' in the NSECE Home-based Provider data. (author abstract)

Other

May, 2016

Describing the preparation and ongoing professional development of the infant/toddler workforce: An analysis of the National Survey for Early Care and Education Data

The analyses presented in this brief describe the professional development activities of the nation's infant/toddler (I/T) workforce, based on nationally-representative data collected by the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE; NSECE Project Team, 2012). The goal of this brief is to help the field better understand the strengths and needs of the I/T workforce in center-based as well as home-based early care and education (ECE) programs. Findings are presented separately for I/T teachers and caregivers in center-based and home-based settings. Results indicate that I/T teachers and caregivers tended to have low levels of education; furthermore, endorsements such as the Child Development Associate Credential (CDA) or state certifications were uncommon. However, most of the I/T workforce had some exposure to college coursework. Among I/T teachers and caregivers in center-based programs, participation in professional development activities varied both by extent of previous education and whether the degree was in ECE or a related field. In general, participation in professional development activities was most common among teachers and caregivers with higher levels of education. For home-based I/T teachers and caregivers, professional development activities tended to be one-time workshops as opposed to more intensive forms of professional development, such as a workshop series or coaching. Only at higher levels of education did a substantial proportion of home-based I/T teachers and caregivers report meeting regularly with others who were looking after children. Professional development for home-based I/T teachers and caregivers tended to focus on health and safety and curriculum. Professional development for center-based I/T teachers and caregivers tended to focus on health and safety and supporting children's social-emotional development. Time release and other supports for professional development varied by education level for both center-based and home-based I/T teachers and caregivers. However, only 15 percent of home-based I/T workforce reported having received financial support for professional development in the past 12 months. Findings are discussed in terms of implications for professional development systems. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

March, 2016

Examining child care subsidy receipt: An analysis of matched NSECE and Illinois administrative data

The National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) team undertook an innovative approach to calculate CCDF program participation. Using probabilistic record linkage methods, the household records from the NSECE were matched to CCDF administrative data from the State of Illinois to form a combined database of survey and administrative data. That combined database allowed creation of CCDF program participation variables from NSECE households' over-time records in the childcare subsidies program. The unified database created from this exercise resembles one from a cross-sectional survey that, by asking retrospective questions, identifies households' recent participation in social programs (CCDF, in our case). But the unified database has the advantage of a more accurate participation variable from administrative data than would have been obtained from a survey self-report. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

February, 2016

Characteristics of home-based early care and education providers: Initial findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education

About a million paid and an additional 2.7 million unpaid home-based providers are responsible for young children not their own for at least five hours each week. This technical report uses data from the newly available National Survey of Early Care and Education to provide a nationally representative estimate of all home-based care to children ages birth through five years and not yet in kindergarten. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

February, 2016

Digging into the NSECE: Exploiting the potential of the household and provider data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE): Populating the calendar file (CAPI demo)

This video presentation provides a Computer Assisted Personal Interview (CAPI) demo used to capture non-parental child care provision data to populate the calendar file used in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE).

Multimedia

July, 2015

Digging into the NSECE: Exploiting the potential of the household and provider data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE): Prices and cost in the NSECE

This video presentation discusses price and cost definitions as related to those used in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE).

Multimedia

July, 2015

Digging into the NSECE: Exploiting the potential of the household and provider data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE): Age of child in the NSECE

This video presentation examines both definition distinctions concerning age of child and types of care used in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE).

Multimedia

July, 2015

Digging into the NSECE: Exploiting the potential of the household and provider data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE): Type of care in the NSECE

This video presentation discusses definitions of specific types of care, along with samples used in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE).

Multimedia

July, 2015

Digging into the NSECE: Exploiting the potential of the household and provider data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE): Using household and provider data to measure enrollment, usage

This video presentation discusses the availability and potential uses of the non-parental care usage and enrollment data found in the National Survey of Early Care and Education's (NSECE) household and provider data files. Topics examined include: usage definition; types of variables provided; which data set to use (household or provider); considerations in choosing a data file; and advantage comparisons to using each dataset.

Multimedia

July, 2015

Which early care and education centers participate in Head Start or public pre-kindergarten?

Newly released data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education provide a unique opportunity to understand Head Start and Public Pre-K offerings within the context of all center-based ECE to children age five and under. These two prominent initiatives involve almost 40 percent of all ECE centers nationally. Most centers receiving any Head Start or Public Pre-K funding are also serving young children through other ECE services such as parent-funded preschool. In fact, 25 percent of centers with Head Start (but no Public Pre-K) funding and 45 percent of centers with Public Pre-K (but no Head Start) funding are also supported with private funds. Fewer than one in five centers with Head Start or Public Pre-K funding are operated by a public school district. The NSECE data indicate that ECE centers nationally are a diverse group in terms of size, auspice, mix of public/private funding, and other characteristics; the same can be said for centers receiving any Head Start or Public Pre-K funds. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

September, 2015

Identifying and Exploring Profiles of Home-Based Child Care Providers: A Mixed Methods Study of Licensed and Unlicensed Providers

This mixed methods study seeks to broaden the understanding of home-based child care providers and their beliefs and practices related to children and families. Many low-income children from birth to five receive care in home-based child care settings. However, relatively little is known about home-based providers, how they view their role, the quality of care they provide, and how to effectively engage them in quality improvement initiatives. This study uses a national sample of home-based providers from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to explore national trends, as well as a sample of providers in Delaware to garner a deeper understanding of the results of the analysis of the national data.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects

2015

Measuring predictors of quality in early care and education settings in the National Survey of Early Care and Education

This report, Measuring Predictors of Quality in Early Care and Education Settings in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE), is intended as a methodological report on how selected predictors of quality can be measured using the NSECE data. It also provides descriptive data for each of the selected predictors of quality. Attributes of early care and education settings that contribute to quality are considered at the level of the individual teacher and caregiver, at the level of the classroom or home-based group, and at the level of the center- and home-based program at a single location. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

September, 2015

Household Survey [PowerPoint]

This presentation focuses on the Household Survey used in the NSECE. Examined aspects of the survey include data collection, topics covered by the survey, household data, survey respondents, levels of observation, and key differences across the categories of survey files.

Other

2015

Workforce Survey [PowerPoint]

This presentation focuses on the Workforce Survey used in the NSECE. Examined aspects of the survey include data collection, topics covered by the survey, workforce data, survey respondents, levels of observation, and key differences across the categories of survey files.

Other

2015

Center-Based Provider Survey [PowerPoint]

This presentation focuses on the Center-Based Provider Survey used in the NSECE. Examined aspects of the survey include data collection, topics covered by the survey, provider data, survey respondents, levels of observation, and key differences across the categories of survey files.

Other

2015

Overall study design and sampling approach [PowerPoint]

This tutorial covers the overall study design and sampling approach of the NSECE. Discussion focuses on the sample sources and the four NSECE surveys at the foundation of the NSECE data collection design, including topics such as sample sizes, the use of provider clusters, geographic characteristics available, and the importance of weighting due to the study design.

Other

2015

Data files and documentation [PowerPoint]

The slides of this presentation provide information on the structure and use of the dataset of the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE). The data files and documentation are described in detail in this tutorial. The slides will describe the type of variables available in each of the five categories of data files the NSECE will offer: Quick Tabulation, Public Use, Level 1 Restricted-Use Questionnaire, Level 2 Restricted-Use Geographic, and Level 3 Restricted-Use Identifying. In addition, types of documentation and the information they contain is described.

Other

2015

NSECE webinar 2: Key definitions and sample characteristics

The second webinar uses publicly available documents to explain key definitions and sample characteristics for each of the four main NSECE data files (Household, Home-based ECE Provider, Center-based ECE Provider, classroom-assigned Center-based ECE Workforce). This webinar helps researchers beginning to work with the NSECE data understand some key characteristics of the data before they conduct analyses. (author abstract)

Multimedia

18 May, 2015

Prices charged in early care and education: Initial findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)

This brief uses data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to describe prices charged by center- and home-based providers of early care and education (ECE), as well as the incidence of care that is free to all parents. These data come from both the NSECE Center-Based Provider Survey and the NSECE Home-Based Provider Survey; external data sources were used to classify the locations of the sampled providers. This brief describes the maximum price of full-time care, without any subsidies, that providers were charging families in 2012 (when NSECE interviews were carried out). This "market price" for care is the type of data commonly collected in Market Rate Studies required by the Child Care Development Fund. It is related to, but can be quite different from, the cost of care to parents and providers' costs for providing care. The brief also reports the percent of providers, such as Head Start and publicly funded pre-K programs that provide care free to all the families they serve. In addition to providing national information, we examine how prices and availability of free care vary by community characteristics such as poverty and urbanicity. For center-based programs, we also examine variation by receipt of public funding. In the next section of the brief we describe the NSECE and other data sources for this analysis. We then present estimates for the prevalence of care that is free to all parents, and, for those programs that do charge for care, the distribution of prices for center-based programs. Home-based estimates of these two items follow. We conclude the brief with discussion of the presented estimates and suggestions for further research. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

March, 2015

NSECE webinar 1: Study design, sampling, and public release of the National Survey of Early Care and Education

This webinar on the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) presents an overview of the study design, a guide to the study's data files, a guide to data file documentation, and a description of the key features of each of the four main NSECE surveys, namely the household, home-based providers, center-based providers, and classroom-assigned center-based workforce surveys.

Multimedia

08 May, 2015

Characteristics of center-based early care and education programs: Initial findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)

In this report we exploit newly available data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to construct the first nationally representative estimates of all center-based care to children birth through age five years, not yet in kindergarten. We describe center-based early care and education (ECE) programs by such key characteristics as enrollment size, ages of children served, revenue sources, auspice and sponsorship and hours of operation. We also provide national estimates of total children enrolled in these programs. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

November, 2014

Worthy work, STILL unlivable wages: The early childhood workforce 25 years after the National Child Care Staffing Study

This report is a compilation of studies and discussions addressing the working conditions of early childhood teachers in 1989 and 2014. Additional chapters address the consequences of compensation decisions, the use of public benefits among families of staff, and the variety of state and national policy efforts related to the wages of early childhood teachers.

Reports & Papers

2014

Household search for and perceptions of early care and education: Initial findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)

This brief uses new, nationally representative data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)--funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services--to describe critical elements in the decision-making process of parents and other caregivers regarding the nonparental care of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. The NSECE is comprised of four nationally representative surveys that were conducted in 2012. These coordinated surveys were designed to provide in-depth data on multiple dimensions of early care and education (ECE) in the United States, including the availability of ECE, preferences and needs for ECE and school-age care, the use of ECE and school-age care, and a description of the ECE workforce. One of the four surveys--the Household Survey--gathered data from households with young children, while the other three collected data from center-and home-based ECE providers. The NSECE oversampled from low-income areas because the experiences of low-income families are of critical public policy interest. This brief uses data from the Household Survey to provide insight into how parents perceive the ECE arrangements available to them, how and why they search for care, and when searches result in a change in arrangement. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

October, 2014

National Survey of Early Care and Education: Summary data collection and sampling methodology

An overview of the sample design and data collection of the National Survey of Early Care and Education, a study of the availability and utilization of early care and education in the United States

Other

October, 2013

Number and characteristics of early care and education (ECE) teachers and caregivers: Initial findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)

Findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education, a study of the availability and utilization of early care and education in the United States, that examine workforce size, program sponsorship, educational attainment, wages, health insurance, and years of experience, based on questionnaires from more than 10,000 center- and home-based providers

Reports & Papers

October, 2013

National Survey of Early Care & Education: Workforce [Classroom Staff] Questionnaire (Rev. ed.)

Instruments

28 November, 2011

National Survey of Early Care & Education: Household Questionnaire (Rev. ed.)

Instruments

28 November, 2011

National Survey of Early Care & Education: Household Screener (Rev. ed.)

Instruments

28 November, 2011

National Survey of Early Care & Education: Home-Based Provider Questionnaire (Rev. ed.)

Instruments

28 November, 2011

National Survey of Early Care & Education: Center-Based Provider Screener (Rev. ed.)

Instruments

28 November, 2011

National Survey of Early Care & Education: Center-Based Provider Questionnaire (Rev. ed.)

Instruments

28 November, 2011

National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)

The objective of the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) is to document the nation's current utilization and availability of early care and education (including school-age care), and to deepen understanding of the extent to which families' needs and preferences coordinate well with provider's offerings and constraints. The experiences of low-income families are of special interest as they are the focus of a significant component of early care and education/school-age (ECE/SA) public policy. The NSECE calls for a nationally-representative sample including interviews in all fifty states and Washington, DC. Data are scheduled to be collected December 2011-May 2012. The final NSECE design includes four survey components and four related questionnaires: (1) The Household Survey conducted with a parent or guardian of a child or children under age 13. Eligible respondents are to be identified through the Household Screener, and information collected about every child under age 13 in each sampled household, including all the regular ECE arrangements. Data include 17,512 interviews with adults in households with children under age 13; (2) The Family, Friend, Neighbor and Nanny (FFNN) Survey conducted with individuals who care in a home-based setting for children under age 13 who are not their own (and who do not appear on an administrative list of ECE/SA providers). Eligible respondents are to be identified through the Household Screener, and estimated data will include approximately 5,000 completed interviews with FFNN providers; (3) The Formal Provider Survey conducted with directors of ECE/SA providers who can be identified from administrative lists such as state licensing lists, Head Start program records, or pre-K rolls, including regulated or registered home-based providers who appear on state-level administrative lists. Data will include interviews with 18,800 programs; (4) The Workforce Provider Survey conducted with one staff member from each of the sampled formal providers after each Center-based Provider interview is completed. Data will include interviews with workforce members from 10,800 programs. The NSECE contract also includes an option for States to contribute to the study to supplement samples in order to conduct state-level studies of populations of interest. Preparatory work for the NSECE was accomplished through the Design Phase of the National Study of Child Care Supply and Demand.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects

2010