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Current Search: topic:subsidy-use;   
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Child care subsidies promote mothers' employment and children's development
Henry, Colleen, 2003
(IWPR Publication No. G714). Washington, DC: Institute for Women's Policy Research.

An exploration of factors associated with the occupational outcomes of urban low income mothers, including child care problems, household characteristics, type of child care used, race/ethnicity, neighborhood characteristics, welfare status, and subsidy usage, based on data collected from a sample of 1,072 low income mothers from poor Philadelphia neighborhoods

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Child care assistance helps families work: A review of the effects of subsidy receipt on employment
Matthews, Hannah, 2006
Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy.

A policy brief presenting research findings on the relationship between child care subsidy receipt and mothers' employment

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Oregon's employment-related child-care subsidy program: An investment that makes employment work for low-wage families
Scott, Ellen K., January, 2011
Eugene: University of Oregon.

A summary of a study of Oregon parents' employment, child care arrangements, and child care subsidy experiences before and after changes to state child care subsidy policy in 2007, based on interviews with 44 subsidy recipients and 15 of their child care providers

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Parent employment and the use of child care subsidies [Research brief]
Lawrence, Sharmila, June 2006
New York: Child Care & Early Education Research Connections

A summary of a review of research studies examining parent employment outcomes associated with the use of child care subsidies

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Making employment work for low wage families: Oregon's employment-related child care subsidy program
Scott, Ellen K., January, 2010
Eugene: University of Oregon.

A summary of a study of Oregon child care subsidy recipients' work and subsidy experiences and child care costs, based on interviews with 24 subsidy recipients

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Encouraging work through child care subsidies
Blau, David M.,
JCPR Policy Briefs, 3(8).

Highlights from a study on the correlation between the receipt of child care subsidies and recipients’ employment rates, based on a subsample of 4,029 families from the 1997 National Survey of America’s Families

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Working in Minnesota: Parents' employment and earnings in the Child Care Assistance Program
Jefferys, Marcie, 2004
St. Paul: Minnesota Department of Human Services.

A study on the impact of child care subsidies on labor force involvement of low income families; an analysis of data on earnings and type of employer (by industry) for parents receiving child care assistance

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Fill the gap: Child care supports workers and employers
Cornell University. Department of City and Regional Planning, 2002
Ithaca, NY: Day Care and Child Development Council of Tompkins County.

Statistics on the economic and workforce impact of child care subsidies in Tompkins County, Oregon

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Improve subsidy policies
Center for Law and Social Policy, March, 2009
Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy.

State policy recommendations for ensuring that state child care subsidy policies support stable, high-quality child care arrangements

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Child care assistance: Helping parents work and children succeed
Matthews, Hannah, 24 July, 2014
Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy.

This brief highlights why child care assistance is an essential work support program for low-income working families and provides evidence that these subsidies are associated with sustainable employment for parents and improved child outcomes. It makes the case for why additional investments at the federal and state level are critical. (author abstract)

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Child care fee subsidies in Canada
Beach, Jane, 2005
Toronto, Ontario, Canada: University of Toronto, Childcare Resource and Research Unit.

A brief summarizing Canada's child care fee subsidies in terms of historical context and eligibility requirements for all provinces and territories

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Introduction to child care subsidy research
Kreader, J. Lee, October 2005
New York: Child Care & Early Education Research Connections

An overview of research on subsidized child care since 1996

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Predictors of child care subsidy use [Research brief]
Lawrence, Sharmila, December 2005
New York: Child Care & Early Education Research Connections

An examination of associations among family characteristics, child care arrangements and the use of child care subsidies

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Improving the employability of parents in Sure Start local programmes
Sure Start (Programme), June, 2004
Nottingham, United Kingdom: Great Britain, Department for Education and Skills.

An inquiry into the influence of job training services on the employability of parents in Sure Start local programs (SSLPs), using information from an assessment of 260 families participating in Sure Start programs in England

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Child care workshops provide benefits to employees and employers
Mazurkiewicz, Jocelyn,
(Impact Brief Three). Ithaca, NY: Linking Economic Development and Child Care Research Project.

A summary of a study of Working Parents for a Working New York, an initiative to extend access to child care subsidies to low to moderate income working families and offer work-family support workshops, that examines the impact of workshops on productivity and work-family conflict, based on baseline and follow-up survey data collected from 92 treatment and 77 control group members

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Why do they leave?: Child care subsidy use in Oregon
Grobe, Deana, 2006
Corvallis: Oregon Child Care Research Partnership.

A summary of findings from an investigation into why Oregon parents leave the child care subsidy system, with a comparison of those findings to studies examining why eligible parents did not take up subsidies

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Virginia's local social service agencies: Child care quality, improvement, subsidy data, and what would be most useful in an early childhood data system
Bradburn, Isabel, March, 2010
Richmond, VA: Project Child HANDS.

The authors examine how the local departments of social services across Virginia reported allocating their quality improvement (QI) funds in 2009. They also sought to discover what types of data are routinely collected, as well as what types of information localities would like from an early childhood data system. A survey of the departments revealed the types of data collected related to the child care subsidy program, preschool and childcare, childcare quality, and learning outcomes. Also surveyed were the methods agencies used to store data. Results indicate that the majority of 2009 QI funds appear to be dedicated to purchasing materials, curricula, and professional development activities, rather than to assessment, family-oriented activities, or business practices. Type of care is the only data reported that they collect additional quality-related information related to subsidy care. Localities cited the tracking of a 5-year cap for child care assistance, parent employment as related to child care use, and child care quality by type of provider as the top three data types that would prove most helpful to them. Future research could shed light upon the professional development and curricula choices of localities.

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New visions for welfare policy: Child care subsidies promote economic development
Cornell University. Department of City and Regional Planning, 2002
Ithaca, NY: Day Care and Child Development Council of Tompkins County.

Statistics on the economic and workforce impact of child care subsidies in Tompkins County, Oregon

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Characteristics of an exit cohort of AFDC recipients that affect use of child care subsidies
Pearlmutter, Sue, 1999
(Briefing Report No. 9902). Cleveland, OH: Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences (Case Western Reserve University), Center on Urban Poverty and Social Change.

A report on characteristics of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) leavers in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, that predict child care subsidy use

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Understanding the duration of child care subsidy use in Rhode Island
Rhode Island Kids Count (Organization), November 2006
(Child Care Snapshot No. 4). Providence: Rhode Island Kids Count.

A fact sheet summarizing three Rhode Island families' use of child care subsidies over the course of seven years

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Meeting the early learning challenge: Better child care subsidy policies
Matthews, Hannah, September, 2011
Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy.

A discussion of child care subsidy policy recommendations to increase access to high-quality early care and education programs

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Child care in Delaware: A short report on subsidies, affordability and supply
United States. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, 1999
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation.

A summary of research findings on the gap between the number of children eligible for child care subsidies in Delaware, under both the state and federal income eligibility guidelines, and the number of children actually served. This brief also provides an overview of Delaware's child care administration policies.

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Child care subsidies: Federal grants and tax benefits for working families
Gabe, Thomas, 15 March, 1999
(RL30081). Washington, DC: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service

A description of federal grants and tax benefits for working families with children, with a focus on the Child Care Development Fund (CCDF), the child and dependent care tax credit (DCTC), and the dependent care assistance program (DCAP)

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Child care in Florida: A short report on subsidies, affordability and supply
United States. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, 1999
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation.

A summary of research findings on the gap between the number of children eligible for child care subsidies in Florida, under both the state and federal income eligibility guidelines, and the number of children actually served. This brief also provides an overview of Florida's child care administration policies.

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Family child care providers in the subsidy system: The need for support
Adams, Diane B., 2002
(Brief & to the Point Issue Brief No. 4). Madison: University of Wisconsin--Extension.

A brief on family child care providers who are part of the subsidy system, highlighting their characteristics and qualifications, care for relatives versus non-relatives, and professionalism

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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