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1.

The effects of Healthy Steps on discipline strategies of parents and toddlers
Caughy, Margaret O'Brien; Miller, Therese L.; Genevro, Janice L.; et al., 2003
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 24(5), 517-534

An examination of the effects of Healthy Steps (HS), a national demonstration project to provide support for parents of young children through the pediatricianís office, in changing discipline strategies used by participants when the child was approximately 1 1/2 years old and again at age 3 and whether HS differentially influenced discipline strategies based on family and child characteristics such as race/ethnicity, social class, and birth order

Reports & Papers

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2.

Better strategies for babies: Strengthening the caregivers and families of infants and toddlers
Gilman, Elizabeth; Collins, Ann, February 2000
(Children and Welfare Reform Issue Brief No. 7). New York: Columbia University, National Center for Children in Poverty.

An overview of state and local efforts to provide assistance to low income parents, currently in or moving into the workforce, in the areas of infant and toddler child care, healthy parent child relationships, and economic security

Fact Sheets & Briefs

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3.

Perceptions of nursery staff and parent views of healthy eating promotion in preschool settings: An exploratory qualitative study
McSweeney, Lorraine A.; Haighton, Catherine A.; Rapley, Tim; et al., 19 August, 2016
BMC Public Health, 16, 1-9

In the UK just over a fifth of all children start school overweight or obese and overweight 2-5 year olds are at least 4 times more likely to become overweight adults. This can lead to serious future health problems. The WHO have recently highlighted the preschool years as a critical time for obesity prevention, and have recommended preschools as an ideal setting for intervention. However, existing evidence suggests that the preschool environment, including the knowledge, beliefs and practices of preschool staff and parents of young children attending nurseries can be a barrier to the successful implementation of healthy eating interventions in this setting. Methods: This study examined the perceptions of preschool centre staff and parents' of preschool children of healthy eating promotion within preschool settings. The participants were preschool staff working in private and local authority preschool centres in the North East of England, and parents of preschool children aged 3-4 years. Preschool staff participated in semi-structured interviews (n = 16 female, 1 male). Parents completed a mapping activity interview (n = 14 mothers, 1 father). Thematic analysis was applied to interpret the findings. Results: Complex communication issues surrounding preschool centre dietary 'rules' were apparent. The staff were keen to promote healthy eating to families and felt that parents needed 'education' and 'help'. The staff emphasised that school policies prohibited providing children with sugary or fatty snacks such as crisps, cakes, sweets and 'fizzy' drinks, however, some preschool centres appeared to have difficulty enforcing such guidelines. Parents were open to the idea of healthy eating promotion in preschool settings but were wary of being 'told what to do' and being thought of as 'bad parents'. Conclusions: There is a need to further explore nursery staff members' personal perceptions of health and how food policies which promote healthier food in preschool settings can be embedded and implemented. Family friendly healthy eating strategies and activities which utilise nudge theory should be developed and delivered in a manner that is sensitive to parents' concerns. Preschool settings may offer an opportunity for delivery of such activities. (author abstract)

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4.

The importance of play in promoting healthy child development and maintaining strong parent-child bonds
Ginsburg, Kenneth R., January 2007
Pediatrics, 119(1), 182-191

A discussion of the diminished role of play in child care and education environments, and a presentation of guidelines to which pediatricians can refer in the course of advocating for children and helping families, schools, and communities to appreciate the benefits of play to child development

Other

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5.

Healthy Steps National Evaluation
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,
The Women's and Children's Health Policy Center of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A longitudinal evaluation of Healthy Steps for Young Children, an initiative to increase collaboration between parents and health care professionals

Major Research Projects

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6.

Perceived parental barriers to and strategies for supporting physical activity and healthy eating among Head Start children
Ling, Jiying; Hines-Martin, Vicki; Robbins, Lorraine B.; et al., June, 2016
Journal of Community Health, 41(3), 593-602

Despite the need for parents to support their children's healthy behaviors, knowledge of factors preventing parents from doing so is still rudimentary. This study primarily aimed to explore perceived parental barriers to and strategies for supporting physical activity and healthy eating among Head Start children. A semi-structured interview format was used with four focus groups conducted at two urban Head Start centers in the Midwestern U.S. A qualitative content analysis of audio-recorded sessions was facilitated using ATLAS.ti7. A convenience sample of 32 parents ([mean]age = 34.97 years) participated. Over half were female (78.1 %), African Americans (65.6 %), and single (65.6 %). About 61.3 % reported an annual family income <$20,000, and 43.8 % were unemployed. Three themes reflected the barriers: (1) intrapersonal (child): short attention span and limited eating preferences; (2) interpersonal (parent): lack of time and cooking skills and a tight family budget; and (3) environmental: inaccessible programs, lack of age-appropriate education, electronic media use, and unsafe environment. Parents across all groups expressed high interest in enrolling in a program with their children. Recommendations included: parents' support team; family outings at parks; taking a walk or enrolling in a class with children; and planting a garden. Many parents showed their preference for face-to-face meetings and a support group, but repulsion of counseling. To promote parental support in future interventions with Head Start children, their perceived intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental barriers should be considered as intervention targets. Involving parents through a support group and face-to-face meetings is recommended. (author abstract)

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7.

Role modeling as an early childhood obesity prevention strategy: Effect of parents and teachers on preschool children's healthy lifestyle habits
Natale, Ruby; Arheart, Kris L.; Delamater, Alan; et al., July/August 2014
Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 35(6), 378-387

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of a child care center-based parent and teacher healthy lifestyle role-modeling program on child nutrition and physical activity outcomes. Methods: Child care centers (N = 28) serving low-income families were randomized to intervention or control arms. Intervention centers (N = 12) implemented (1) menu modifications, (2) a child's healthy lifestyle curriculum, and (3) an adult (teacher- and parent-focused) healthy lifestyle role-modeling curriculum. Control centers (N = 16) received an attention control safety curriculum. Nutrition and physical activity data were collected at the beginning (T1) and at the end (T2) of the school year. Exploratory factor analysis identified positive and negative nutrition and physical activity practices by children, parents, and teachers. Results: Intervention parents' baseline ([beta] = .52, p < .0001) and school year consumption ([beta] = .47, p < .0001) of fruits/vegetables significantly increased their children's consumption of fruits/vegetables from T1 to T2. Intervention parents significantly influenced a decrease in children's junk food consumption ([beta] = -.04, p < .05), whereas control parents significantly influenced an increase in their children's junk food consumption ([beta] = .60, p < .001) from T1 to T2. Control children showed a significant increase in junk food consumption ([beta] = .11, p = .01) and sedentary behavior ([beta] = .09, p < .005) from T1 to T2. Teachers did not significantly influence preschool-age children's nutrition or physical activity patterns from T1 to T2. Conclusions: Parent nutrition and physical activity patterns significantly influence their preschool-age children's consumption of fruits/vegetables, junk food, and level of sedentary behavior. Future obesity prevention intervention efforts targeting this age group should include parents as healthy lifestyle role models for their children. (author abstract)

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8.

The effects of the Healthy Steps for Young Children Program: Results from observations of parenting and child development
Caughy, Margaret O'Brien; Miller, Therese L.; Genevro, Janice L.; et al., 2004
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 19(4), 611-630

An examination of the effects of the Healthy Steps for Young Children Program (HS) on parent-child interaction and children's socioemotional development

Reports & Papers

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9.

Efficacy of the Lunch is in the Bag intervention to increase parents' packing of healthy bag lunches for young children: A cluster-randomized trial in early care and education centers
Roberts-Gray, Cindy; Romo-Palafox, Maria Jose; Ranjit, Nalini; et al., 08 January, 2016
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 13, 1-19

Background: Lunches that parents pack for their young children to eat at school or the Early Care and Education (ECE) center fall short of recommended standards. Lunch is in the Bag is a multi-level behavioral nutrition intervention to increase parents' packing of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains in their children's lunches. Designed for implementation in ECE centers, the five-week long intervention is followed three months later with a one-week booster. Methods: Efficacy of Lunch is in the Bag was tested in cluster randomized trial. Participants were 633 families from 30 ECE centers (15 intervention, 15 control) across Austin, San Antonio, and Houston, Texas, USA. Primary outcomes were servings of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains observed in the children's parent-packed bag lunches. Servings of refined grains, meats/beans/eggs/nuts, dairy, chips, and sweets also were observed. Data were collected at baseline, post-intervention (6-week follow-up), pre-booster (22-weeks follow-up), and post-booster (28-week follow-up). Time-by-treatment interactions were analyzed separately for each of the food groups using multi-level models to compare changes from baseline. Analyses were adjusted for relevant demographic variables and clustering within centers and parents. Results: The intervention effected increases from baseline to 6-week follow-up in vegetables (0.17 servings, SE = 0.04, P < 0.001) and whole grains (0.30 servings, SE = 0.13, P = 0.018). The increase in whole grains was maintained through the 28-week follow-up (0.34 servings, SE = 0.13, P = 0.009). Fruit averaged more than 1.40 servings with no differences between groups or across time. The intervention prevented increase in sweets (-0.43 servings, SE = 0.11, P < .001, at the 22-week follow-up). Parents persisted, however, in packing small amounts of vegetables (averages of 0.41 to 0.52 servings) and large amounts of sweets and chips (averages of 1.75 to 1.99 servings). Conclusions: The need for and positive effects of the Lunch is in the Bag intervention at ECE centers where parents send bag lunch for their preschool-aged children was confirmed. An important direction for future research is discovery of more options for leveraging the partnership of ECE centers and families to help young children learn to eat and enjoy vegetables and other healthy foods in preference to less healthy choices such as chips and sweets. (author abstract)

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10.

Kids on the move: Afterschool programs promoting healthy eating and physical activity
Afterschool Alliance,
Washington, DC: Afterschool Alliance.

This special report concentrates on parents' reports of efforts made by afterschool programs to help improve the health and physical fitness of children and youth around the country. It also describes areas where afterschool programs can better meet the needs of students and families when it comes to health and wellness and outlines steps afterschool programs can take to help make positive change for students' overall health. The findings in this report are based on survey responses from parents in 2014, during which 30,720 households were screened nationally and 13,709 households completed in-depth interviews. (author abstract)

Executive Summary

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11.

Kids on the move: Afterschool programs promoting healthy eating and physical activity
Afterschool Alliance,
Washington, DC: Afterschool Alliance.

The focus of this America After 3PM special report, "Kids on the Move: Afterschool Programs Promoting Healthy Eating and Physical Activity," is on the role that afterschool programs are playing to support the health and wellness of their students. More specifically, this report will cover parents' expectations of afterschool programs to keep their child healthy and active, how satisfied parents are with the food and physical activity provided in their child's afterschool program, and existing opportunities to improve afterschool programs' nutritional and physical activity offerings. Given the high number of students in the U.S. who are living in households where consistent access to healthy food is a challenge, who are overweight or obese, or who are not getting the recommended amount of daily physical activity, this report also outlines strategies to help afterschool programs make even greater strides to address the health and wellness needs of their students and help our nation's children get healthy, stay healthy and lead healthier lives. (author abstract)

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12.

Reading for Healthy Families: Year 1: Summary of findings
Tarte, Jerod M.; Snoddy, Ashley M.; Nuzzo, Wendy M.; et al., June, 2009
Salem: Oregon, Commission on Children and Families.

Findings from an evaluation of the first year of the implementation of Reading for Healthy Families (RFHF), a training program for staff and librarians to teach parents how to develop their children's early literacy skills

Reports & Papers

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13.

Narrowing the income gaps in preventive care for young children: Families in Healthy Steps
McLearn, Kathryn Taaffe; Minkovitz, Cynthia Schaffer; Strobino, Donna M.; et al., 2004
Journal of Urban Health, 81(4), 556-567

A longitudinal investigating if family income has an effect on parental satisfaction with and utilization of Healthy Steps, a universal pediatric care program that provides enhanced developmental and behavioral services

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14.

Initial findings from a randomized, controlled trial of Healthy Families Massachusetts: Early program impacts on young mothers' parenting
Easterbrooks, M. Ann; Contreras, Mariah M.; Chaudhuri, Jana H.; et al.,
Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States.

This study investigates how characteristics of young mothers, their childrearing environments, and their participation in a paraprofessional home visiting program for young parents determine the program's impact on parenting, including child maltreatment. It is intended to contribute to the general literature on home visiting effectiveness, and to shed particular light on individual and contextual characteristics that moderate program effects. Findings should also advance policymakers' and practitioners' efforts to maximize the impact of home visitation as a strategy to prevent child maltreatment. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

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15.

Healthy Child Care America: Blueprint for action
Healthy Child Care America, 1996
Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.

A presentation of Healthy Child Care Americaís Blueprint for Action, which describes 10 steps communities can follow to ensure the healthy development of their children, focusing on creating and maximizing linkages between health care professionals and the child care community

Other

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16.

Healthy Steps: The first three years: Executive Summary
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 2003
Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University. Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center.

A summary of an evaluation of the Healthy Steps for Young Children program, a pediatric primary care intervention, based on a cohort of children from birth to age 3 at 15 evaluation sites located throughout the United States, including a cost/benefit analysis of the program and an assessment of its sustainability

Executive Summary

17.

Food for thought: A survey of healthy eating in registered childcare
Great Britain. Office for Standards in Education (England), March 2006
(Reference No. HMI 2548). London: Great Britain, Office for Standards in Education.

A study of the quality of food, in terms of its contribution to a healthy, nutritious diet, provided in registered child care settings in England, based on a survey of child care providers

Reports & Papers

18.

Healthy Steps: The first three years
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 2003
Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center.

An evaluation of the Healthy Steps for Young Children program, a pediatric primary care intervention, based on a cohort of children from birth to age 3 at 15 evaluation sites located throughout the United States, including a cost/benefit analysis of the program and an assessment of its sustainability

Reports & Papers

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19.

Caring about employability
Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada, 2006
Ottawa, Ontario: Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada.

An outline of the potential effects of quality universal child care services on the employment status of parents and the healthy development of their children

Fact Sheets & Briefs

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20.

Healthy Steps: Affiliate evaluation final report
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 2003
Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center.

An evaluation of the Healthy Steps for Young Children program, a pediatric primary care intervention, at six selected affiliate sites whose participants differed from the families in the national evaluation in terms of age, education, socioeconomic status, and Hispanic origin

Reports & Papers

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21.

Early effects of the Healthy Steps for Young Children program
Minkovitz, Cynthia Schaffer; Scharfstein, Daniel; Healthy Steps Evaluation Team; et al., 2001
Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 155(4), 470-479

An evaluation of the implementation and effects of The Healthy Steps for Young Children Program for children aged 2 to 4, focusing on services received, satisfaction with services, and parent practices

Reports & Papers

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22.

Parenting education: A Key Topic Resource List
Child Care & Early Education Research Connections, May, 2007
New York: Child Care & Early Education Research Connections

A compilation of selected Research Connections resources focused on parenting education as it relates to child care and early education, including a summary of issues addressed in the literature, and a list of resources in the areas of: parent education programs; Even Start/ family literacy; Head Start/Early Head Start; and Healthy Steps

Bibliographies

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23.

Reshaping primary care: The Healthy Steps initiative
Lawrence, Patricia R.; Bernard, Andrea; Magee, Tracy; et al., 2000
Journal of Pediatric Health Care, 15(2), 58-62

An overview of the Healthy Steps Initiative, with a discussion of funding, partnerships, and approaches towards the improvement of primary care for infants and toddlers

Reports & Papers

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24.

Healthy Steps: A case study of innovation in pediatric practice
Zuckerman, Barry; Augustyn, Marilyn; Barth, Michael C.; et al., 2004
Pediatrics, 114(3), 820-826

A comparative study evaluating the effectiveness of Healthy Steps, a child care program designed to enhance and expand traditional pediatric care

Reports & Papers

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25.

Healthy Futures: Year two evaluation report
Perry, Deborah F.; Deardorff, Sarah, 30 September, 2012
Washington, DC: District of Columbia, Department of Mental Health.

The Washington DC Department of Mental Health (DMH) recently completed the second year of implementing an evidence-informed mental health consultation project in 25 community-based child development centers (CDCs). The Healthy Futures project is based largely upon a model developed by the Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development. In this model: Four full-time, licensed mental health professionals provide weekly on-site mental health consultation services aimed at building the capacity of directors and staff at CDCs to reduce challenging behaviors and promote positive social-emotional development. Consultants also help to identify those young children in need of more intensive services, providing child-specific consultation services as well as facilitating referrals for community-based services. An evaluation of the Healthy Futures project was contracted for by the DMH with the Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development. A random sample of 57 classrooms was selected for the in-depth data collection. The evaluation measured the frequency and intensity of the consultation services delivered to the CDCs. Data were gathered from the consultants, child care directors and teachers who received programmatic consultation in the CDCs. Additional data were collected from the teachers and parents of children who were referred for child-specific consultation from July 2011 to June 2012. The social-emotional climate of a smaller sample of 16 classrooms was assessed in the fall and spring of school year 2011-12 by an objective observer using the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS.) (author abstract)

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26.

The impact of asthma health education for parents of children attending Head Start centers
Zuniga, Genny Carrillo; Kirk, Sarah; Mier, Nelda; et al., December, 2012
Journal of Community Health, 37(6), 1296-1300

A study of the relationship between the delivery of the Healthy Homes training, an asthma and healthy homes curriculum, and the degree to which participants made changes to their households, based on data from 115 parents in eight Head Start sites in Hidalgo County, Texas

Reports & Papers

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27.

Integrating Healthy Steps into PNP graduate education
Crowley, Angela A.; Magee, Tracy, 2003
Journal of Pediatric Health Care, 17(5), 232-239

An evaluation of the value of adding an adapted version of the Healthy Steps program for Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PNP) graduate students, and an exploration of the PNP program directorsí perceptions of Healthy Steps programsí practices and educational preparation

Reports & Papers

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28.

The long term effects of non-parental care on children
Healthy Child Manitoba; South Eastman Health; Division scolaire franco-manitobaine; et al., April, 2010
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada: Healthy Child Manitoba.

A longitudinal study of child care arrangements in Manitoba, Canada, and of the relationship between child care, child, and family factors and children's development

Reports & Papers

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29.

Supporting secure parent-child attachments: The role of the non-parental caregiver
Marty, Ana H.; Walters, Connor M.; Readdick, Christine A.; et al., 2005
Early Child Development and Care, 175(3), 271-283

A paper presenting practice recommendations for infant child care workers that will help them support the development and maintenance of secure parent child relationships

Reports & Papers

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30.

Healthy Kids, Healthy Futures Open Gym observations
Thomas, Jordan Elizabeth, May 2010
Unpublished masterís thesis, Northeastern University, Boston, MA

A study of the moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) of children and caregivers before, during, and after participation in Open Gym from pre- and post- gym questionnaires and direct observation of 10 caregivers, children, and 17 student activity leaders in an urban neighborhood in Boston

Reports & Papers

31.

Healthy environments, healthy children: Children in families: A report on the 1997 Panel Study of Income Dynamics, Child Development Supplement
Hofferth, Sandra L., 1998
Ann Arbor: University of Michigan, Institute for Social Research.

A summary of the results of the Child Development Study, a supplemental study to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics

Reports & Papers

32.

Abriendo Puertas/Opening Doors: Improving parenting skills in Latino parents: A randomized, waitlist control study [PowerPoint]
Torres, Alicia; Gutierrez, Sandra; Yoon, Ruth; et al., 25 June, 2014
Bethesda, MD: Child Trends

This PowerPoint presentation accompanies a webinar that discusses findings from an impact study of the Abriendo Puertas/Opening Doors program, conducted in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Focus groups provided parents' perspectives and addressed such topics as: diet and healthy living; emotional support for their children; educational readiness support practices at home; and parental advocacy for children's rights at school.

Other

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33.

Dietary quality of preschoolers' sack lunches as measured by the Healthy Eating Index
Romo-Palafox, Maria Jose; Ranjit, Nalini; Hoelscher, Deanna M.; et al., November, 2015
Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 115(11), 1779-1788

Background Eating habits are developed during the preschool years and track into adulthood, but few studies have quantified dietary quality of meals packed by parents for preschool children enrolled in early care and education centers. Objective Our aim was to evaluate the dietary quality of preschoolers' sack lunches using the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) 2010 to provide parents of preschool children with guidance to increase the healthfulness of their child's lunch. Design This study is a cross-sectional analysis of baseline dietary data from the Lunch Is in the Bag trial. Participants A total of 607 parent-child dyads from 30 early care and education centers in Central and South Texas were included. Main outcome measures Total and component scores of the HEI were computed using data obtained from direct observations of packed lunches and of children's consumption. Statistical analysis Three-level regression models with random intercepts at the early care and education center and child level were used; all models were adjusted for child sex, age, and body mass index (calculated as kg/[square meter]). Results Mean HEI-2010 total scores were 58 for lunches packed and 52 for lunches consumed, out of 100 possible points. Mean HEI component scores for packed and consumed lunches were lowest for greens and beans (6% and 8% of possible points), total vegetables (33% and 28%), seafood and plant proteins (33% and 29%), and whole grains (38% and 34%); and highest for empty calories (85% and 68% of possible points), total fruit (80% and 70%), whole fruit (79% and 64%), and total protein foods (76% and 69%). Conclusions Parents of preschool children pack lunches with low dietary quality that lack vegetables, plant proteins, and whole grains, as measured by the HEI. Education of parents and care providers in early care and education centers is vital to ensure that preschoolers receive high dietary-quality meals that promote their preference for and knowledge of a healthy diet. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

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34.

Initial findings from a randomized, controlled trial of Healthy Families Massachusetts: Early program impacts on young mothers' parenting [Executive summary]
Easterbrooks, M. Ann; Contreras, Mariah M.; Chaudhuri, Jana H.; et al.,
Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States.

This evaluation, a randomized, controlled trial of Healthy Families Massachusetts (HFM), a statewide child maltreatment prevention home visiting program for first-time young parents, examined the program's impact on child maltreatment and parenting in a sample of young mothers (N = 687) of infants and toddlers. The study addressed three research questions: (1) Is participation in HFM associated with more optimal parenting and lower rates of child maltreatment? (2) Do characteristics of individuals or their contexts moderate the relation between program and parenting? and (3) For mothers enrolled in the program, is there an association between program utilization and parenting? An introduction to the program, description of study methods, and highlights of the evaluation's key findings follow. (author abstract)

Executive Summary

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35.

A practice-based intervention to enhance quality of care in the first three years of life: The Healthy Steps for Young Children program
Minkovitz, Cynthia Schaffer; Scharfstein, Daniel; Augustyn, Marilyn; et al., 2003
JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 290(23), 3081-3091

An evaluation of The Healthy Steps for Young Children programís effectiveness in increasing quality of care related to developmental and behavioral services for children in the first three years of life and in affecting parenting practices regarding discipline and promotion of childrenís development and safety

Reports & Papers

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36.

Delaware's child care regulations promote healthy child development
Miller, Patti, 2011
Newark, DE: Nemours Health & Prevention Services.

A discussion of provisions in Delaware child care licensing regulations that promote children's physical activity and nutrition

Fact Sheets & Briefs

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37.

Characteristics of a quality parenting education program
Los Angeles County (Calif.). Office of Education. Family Literacy Support Network, December, 2013
Los Angeles: First 5 LA.

In 2002, the Family Literacy Support Network (FLSN) at the Los Angeles County Office of Education (LACOE) was created by a contract from First 5 LA under their family literacy initiative. Over the years, FLSN has worked to build the capacity of schools and community-based organizations in delivering quality family literacy programs that include parenting education as one of four key components that lead to school readiness for young children, and obtainment of family goals for participating parents. The recommendations presented in this brief focus on implementing a quality parenting education program. On April 19, 2013 FLSN hosted a focus group with First 5 LA-Family Literacy Parenting Educators to discuss the key characteristics of a quality parenting program. Nine of the 17 First 5 LA-funded family literacy grantees participated in responding to eight questions. The questions were shared in advance with participants. The focus group was two hours long and conducted by Esther Yasui, FLSN partner. We used a round robin protocol, starting with a different respondent for each question. Participants were given 2-3 minutes to respond to each question. The responses were recorded for purposes of this brief. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

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38.

Healthy Steps: The affiliate evaluation final report: Executive summary
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 2003
Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center.

A summary of an evaluation of the Healthy Steps for Young Children program, a pediatric primary care intervention, at six selected affiliate sites whose participants differed from the families in the national evaluation in terms of age, education, socioeconomic status, and Hispanic origin

Executive Summary

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39.

Healthy Steps: Delivering developmental services for young children through pediatric primary care
Kaplan-Sanoff, Margot, 2001
Infants & Young Children, 13(3), 69-76

A discussion of the Healthy Steps program and its emphasis on behavioral and developmental services for parents with children in the first three years of life

Reports & Papers

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40.

Healthy Futures: Year three evaluation of early childhood mental health consultation
Perry, Deborah F., 30 September, 2013
Washington, DC: District of Columbia, Department of Mental Health.

The Washington D.C. Department of Mental Health (DMH) recently completed the third year of implementing an evidence-informed mental health consultation project in 25 community-based child development centers (CDCs). The Healthy Futures project is based largely upon a model developed by the Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development (Cohen & Kaufmann, 2005; Duran, et al., 2009). In this model four full-time, licensed mental health professionals provide on-site mental health consultation services aimed at building the capacity of directors and staff at CDCs to reduce challenging behaviors and promote positive social-emotional development. Two types of consultation services are offered: Programmatic Consultation: is focused on building the capacity of the teachers on behalf of all children in their classes. Child-specific consultation: is focused on those young children in need of individualized services as well as facilitating referrals for community-based services. An evaluation of the Healthy Futures project was contracted by the DMH with the Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development (GUCCHD). This year, evaluation data were gathered from the consultants, child care directors and teachers who received programmatic consultation in the CDCs. Additional data were collected from the teachers and parents of children who were referred for child-specific consultation from July 2012 to June 2013. This program year, satisfaction data were collected from the CDC directors and analyzed by a graduate student in public health as part of her masters' thesis; she also analyzed the activity logs from the four consultants. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

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41.

Promoting positive parenting through parenting education
Zepeda, Marlene; Varela, Frances; Morales, Alex; et al., January, 2004
(Building State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Series No. 13). University of California, Los Angeles, National Center for Infant and Early Childhood Health Policy.

A guide for the planning and implementation of the parent education program component of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) State Early Childhood Comprehensive Services (SECCS) Initiative, including definitions, strategies, examples, and recommendations

Other

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42.

Effectiveness of a universal parental support programme to promote health behaviours and prevent overweight and obesity in 6-year-old children in disadvantaged areas, the Healthy School Start Study II, a cluster-randomised controlled trial
Nyberg, Gisela; Sundblom, Elinor; Zeebari, Zangin; et al., 21 January, 2016
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 13, 1-14

Background: There is increasing evidence for the effectiveness of parental support programmes to promote healthy behaviours and prevent obesity in children, but only few studies have been conducted among groups with low socio-economic status. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a parental support programme to promote healthy dietary and physical activity habits and to prevent overweight and obesity in six-year-old children in disadvantaged areas. Methods: A cluster-randomised controlled trial was carried out in disadvantaged areas in Stockholm. Participants were six-year-old children (n = 378) and their parents. Thirty-one school classes from 13 schools were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 16) and control groups (n = 15). The intervention lasted for 6 months and included: 1) Health information for parents, 2) Motivational Interviewing with parents and 3) Teacher-led classroom activities with children. Physical activity was measured by accelerometry, dietary intake and screen time with a questionnaire, body weight and height were measured and BMI standard deviation score was calculated. Measurements were conducted at baseline, post-intervention and at 5 months follow-up. Group effects were examined using Mixed-effect Regression analyses adjusted for sex, parental education and baseline values. Results: Fidelity to all three intervention components was satisfactory. Significant intervention effects were found regarding consumption of unhealthy foods (p = 0.01) and unhealthy drinks (p = 0.01). At follow-up, the effect on intake of unhealthy foods was sustained for boys (p = 0.03). There was no intervention effect on physical activity. Further, the intervention had no apparent effect on BMI sds for the whole sample, but a significant difference between groups was detected among children who were obese at baseline (p = 0.03) which was not sustained at follow-up. Conclusions: The Healthy School Start study shows that it is possible to influence intake of unhealthy foods and drinks and weight development in obese children by providing individual parental support in a school context. However, the effects were short-lived. Therefore, the programme needs to be prolonged and/or intensified in order to obtain stronger and sustainable effects. This study is an important contribution to the further development of evidence-based parental support programmes to prevent overweight and obesity in children in disadvantaged areas. (author abstract)

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43.

Healthy eating in early years settings: A review of current national to local guidance for North West England
Bristow, Katie; Goodall, Mark; Abba, Katharine; et al., June 2011
Public Health Nutrition, 14(6), 1008-1016

A qualitative review of the recommendations found in 7 published studies related to the promotion of healthy eating habits in early years settings and a review of related guidelines set by several levels of governments in the countries of the United Kingdom

Literature Review

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44.

The long term effects of non-parental care on children [Executive summary]
Healthy Child Manitoba; South Eastman Health; Division scolaire franco-manitobaine; et al., April 2010
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada: Healthy Child Manitoba.

A summary of a longitudinal study of child care arrangements in Manitoba, Canada, and of the relationship between child care, child, and family factors and children's development

Executive Summary

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45.

Parents value and gain benefits from involvement in Gearing Up for Kindergarten
North Dakota State University. Extension Service, 2014
Fargo: North Dakota State University, Extension Service.

This fact sheet highlights benefits gained by parents who participated with their child(ren) in the Gearing Up for Kindergarten program during the 2013-14 year.

Fact Sheets & Briefs

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46.

Child care providers' strategies for supporting healthy eating: A qualitative approach
Lynch, Meghan; Batal, Malek, January-March 2012
Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 26(1), 107-121

An examination of the strategies child care providers report using to encourage healthy eating for the children in their care, and the factors influencing the providers' choice of strategies, based on data from 8 center-based and 5 home-based providers from the Ottawa region

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47.

Healthy starts for all: Policy prescriptions
Miller, Wilhelmine D.; Sadegh-Nobari, Tabashir; Lillie-Blanton, Marsha; et al., January 2011
American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 40(1), s19-s37

An update on the health of American infants, children, and youth, an identification of evidence-based policies and interventions to improve developmental and health outcomes for young children, and a consideration of current state and federal policies and programmatic initiatives, with policy recommendations for families and young children at risk of poor developmental outcomes

Other

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48.

Children's literacy: Children's Books for Healthy Families/Libros de Ninos para Familias Saludables
Kock, Jo Anne, 2003
Journal of Extension, 41(2)

A special issue of the Journal of Extension, summarizing a longitudinal study of the relationship between parent-child reading activities and emergent literacy in children from birth to age three

Reports & Papers

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49.

Promoting the healthy development of young children
Duncan, Greg J.; Magnuson, Katherine A., 2003
In One percent for the kids: New policies, brighter futures for America's children (pp. 16-39). Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press.

A discussion of policies promoting healthy development among at risk children by decreasing their economic hardship, providing them with decent health care, and enrolling them in universal prekindergarten programs

Other

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50.

Head Start and parent involvement
Henrich, Christopher C.; Gadaire, Dana M., January 01, 2008
Infants & Young Children, 21(1), 56-69

An overview of Head Startís policies and principles for parent involvement

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