Browse the Collection

RC Produced by Research Connections
* Peer Reviewed Journal

16 results found.

Select Citation
Result
Resource Type
1.

21st Century Community Learning Centers: Descriptive study of program practices
United States. Department of Education. Policy and Program Studies Service, July 2010
Washington, DC: United States, Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service.

An exploration of the influence of the implementation of reading and mathematics activities in 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) on children's academic achievement, based on data from surveys and site visits of funded programs during the 2006-2007 school year

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

2.

21st Century Community Learning Centers: Descriptive study of program practices [Executive summary]
United States. Department of Education. Policy and Program Studies Service, July 2010
Washington, DC: United States, Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service.

A summary of an exploration of the influence of the implementation of reading and mathematics activities in 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) on children's academic achievement, based on data from surveys and site visits of funded programs during the 2006-2007 school year

Executive Summary

get fulltext

3.

Analysis of state K-3 reading standards and assessments: Final report
United States. Department of Education. Policy and Program Studies Service, December, 2005
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service.

An examination of the extent to which state kindergarten through third grade (K-3) reading standards and assessments address five components essential to effective reading instruction (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension), based on an analysis of a stratified, random sample of states' reading standards and on the content of reading assessments in states with statewide assessments

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

4.

Case studies of the early implementation of kindergarten entry assessments
Golan, Shari; Davies-Mercier, Betsy; Pistorino, Carol; et al., August, 2016
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service.

States increasingly are incorporating Kindergarten Entry Assessments (KEAs) into their comprehensive assessment systems with the goal of helping educators identify gaps in children's competencies, target instruction to children's individual needs, engage parents to better support their child's learning, and identify needs for expanding and improving early learning opportunities. In 2010, seven states collected KEA data for the purposes of aggregating data at the state level (Daily, Burkhauser, and Halle 2010). By 2014, 29 states were engaged in development and use of KEAs with support from federal programs such as Race To the Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) grants and Enhanced Assessment Grants (EAG). This descriptive study examines the development and early implementation of KEAs in 12 districts and 23 schools within four RTT-ELC states (Maryland, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Washington) during the 2014-15 school year. This was the first year of KEA implementation in Maryland and Pennsylvania, the second year of KEA implementation in Oregon, and the third year of KEA implementation in Washington, so findings reflect the early implementation of these assessments. The study is intended to help states learn from the experiences of other states as they work to develop and implement their own KEAs and to use KEAs to improve instruction and learning. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

5.

Case studies of the early implementation of kindergarten entry assessments [Executive summary]
Golan, Shari; Davies-Mercier, Betsy; Pistorino, Carol; et al., August, 2016
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service.

States increasingly are incorporating Kindergarten Entry Assessments (KEAs) into their comprehensive assessment systems with the goal of helping educators identify gaps in children's competencies, target instruction to children's individual needs, engage parents to better support their child's learning, and identify needs for expanding and improving early learning opportunities. In 2010, seven states collected KEA data for the purposes of aggregating data at the state level (Daily, Burkhauser, and Halle 2010). By 2014, 29 states were engaged in development and use of KEAs with support from federal programs such as Race To the Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) grants and Enhanced Assessment Grants (EAG). This descriptive study examines the development and early implementation of KEAs in 12 districts and 23 schools within four RTT-ELC states (Maryland, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Washington) during the 2014-15 school year. This was the first year of KEA implementation in Maryland and Pennsylvania, the second year of KEA implementation in Oregon, and the third year of KEA implementation in Washington, so findings reflect the early implementation of these assessments. The study is intended to help states learn from the experiences of other states as they work to develop and implement their own KEAs and to use KEAs to improve instruction and learning. (author abstract)

Executive Summary

get fulltext

6.

Case studies of schools implementing early elementary strategies: Preschool through third grade alignment and differentiated instruction
Manship, Karen; Smith, Claire; Drummond, Kathryn; et al., December, 2016
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service.

Participation in high-quality preschool can improve academic, behavioral, social-emotional, and cognitive outcomes for students of varying backgrounds, including students from disadvantaged backgrounds (e.g., Andrews, Jargowsky, and Kuhne 2012; Barnett 2008; Camilli et al. 2010; Karoly and Bigelow 2005; Reynolds et al. 2007). However, some studies have found that some of these benefits do not persist into third grade (e.g., Bogard and Takanishi 2005; Li et al. 2013; Lipsey, Farran, and Hofer 2015; Puma et al. 2012). Without additional and continuous supports as children proceed through the elementary grades, participation in preschool does not inoculate against the potential challenges that children, particularly children at risk for poorer academic outcomes, may face. To explore how educators might build on and sustain the positive effects of preschool, this study examined two types of strategies that preliminary literature searches revealed as promising practices to support children's learning in early elementary school: (1) aligning instruction from preschool through grade 3 (referred to as P-3 alignment) and (2) differentiated instruction. The P-3 alignment strategy emphasizes coordination among standards, curricula, instructional practices and environments, student assessment, and teacher professional development between the preschool years and the early elementary school years. The differentiated instruction strategy focuses on teachers varying their pedagogical practices to meet the diverse needs and skills of individual students. To explore how educators use these two strategies, this study conducted a systematic literature review followed by case studies of five programs that used one or both of these two strategies. The case studies focused on the approaches programs used to implement P-3 and differentiated instruction; some of the approaches revealed may be relevent to early elementary strategies beyond the two strategies studied. This report focuses on the findings of the case studies. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

7.

Case studies of schools implementing early elementary strategies: Preschool through third grade alignment and differentiated instruction [Executive summary]
Manship, Karen; Smith, Claire; Drummond, Kathryn; et al., December, 2016
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service.

Participation in high-quality preschool can improve academic, behavioral, social-emotional, and cognitive outcomes for students of varying backgrounds, including students from disadvantaged backgrounds (e.g., Andrews, Jargowsky, and Kuhne 2012; Barnett 2008; Camilli et al. 2010; Karoly and Bigelow 2005; Reynolds et al. 2007). However, some studies have found that some of these benefits do not persist into third grade (e.g., Bogard and Takanishi 2005; Li et al. 2013; Lipsey, Farran, and Hofer 2015; Puma et al. 2012). Without additional and continuous supports as children proceed through the elementary grades, participation in preschool does not inoculate against the potential challenges that children, particularly children at risk for poorer academic outcomes, may face. To explore how educators might build on and sustain the positive effects of preschool, this study examined two types of strategies that preliminary literature searches revealed as promising practices to support children's learning in early elementary school: (1) aligning instruction from preschool through grade 3 (referred to as P-3 alignment) and (2) differentiated instruction. The P-3 alignment strategy emphasizes coordination among standards, curricula, instructional practices and environments, student assessment, and teacher professional development between the preschool years and the early elementary school years. The differentiated instruction strategy focuses on teachers varying their pedagogical practices to meet the diverse needs and skills of individual students. To explore how educators use these two strategies, this study conducted a systematic literature review followed by case studies of five programs that used one or both of these two strategies. The case studies focused on the approaches programs used to implement P-3 and differentiated instruction; some of the approaches revealed may be relevent to early elementary strategies beyond the two strategies studied. This report focuses on the findings of the case studies. (author abstract)

Executive Summary

get fulltext

8.

Cross-site evaluation of the Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Program
United States. Department of Education. Policy and Program Studies Service, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service.

A summary of findings from an evaluation of the Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Program, which provides grants for professional development activities to early childhood educators working in low-income communities

Fact Sheets & Briefs

get fulltext

9.

Preschool through third grade alignment and differentiated instruction: A literature review
Drummond, Kathryn; Wang, Antonia; Ncube, Mackson; et al., August, 2016
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service.

This literature review provides a review of policies, programs, and practices that have the potential to help students sustain the positive effects of preschool as they progress from kindergarten through grade 3 (K-3). The U.S. Department of Education's Policy and Program Studies Service commissioned this systematic literature review, which focuses on two specific approaches: (1) preschool and K-3 alignment, and (2) differentiated instruction in kindergarten and first grade. (author abstract)

Literature Review

get fulltext

10.

Preschool through third grade alignment and differentiated instruction: A literature review [Executive summary]
Drummond, Kathryn; Wang, Antonia; Ncube, Mackson; et al., August, 2016
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service.

This literature review provides a review of policies, programs, and practices that have the potential to help students sustain the positive effects of preschool as they progress from kindergarten through grade 3 (K-3). The U.S. Department of Education's Policy and Program Studies Service commissioned this systematic literature review, which focuses on two specific approaches: (1) preschool and K-3 alignment, and (2) differentiated instruction in kindergarten and first grade. (author abstract)

Executive Summary

get fulltext

11.

Reading First Implementation Evaluation: Interim report
United States. Department of Education. Policy and Program Studies Service, July 2006
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service.

Interim findings from an implementation evaluation of Reading First--a federally-funded program to improve the quality of reading instruction in kindergarten through third grade (K-3) by using research-based reading programs and materials, promoting professional development, and assessing students' progress--that involved examining differences in program implementation among Reading First grantees and comparing reading instruction in Reading First and non-Reading First Title I schools

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

12.

Reading First Implementation Evaluation: Interim report [Executive summary]
United States. Department of Education. Policy and Program Studies Service, July 2006
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service.

A summary of interim findings from an implementation evaluation of Reading First--a federally-funded program to improve the quality of reading instruction in kindergarten through third grade (K-3) by using research-based reading programs and materials, promoting professional development, and assessing students' progress--that involved examining differences in program implementation among Reading First grantees and comparing reading instruction in Reading First and non-Reading First Title I schools

Executive Summary

get fulltext

13.

Results in brief: Case studies of the early implementation of kindergarten entry assessments
United States. Department of Education. Policy and Program Studies Service, August, 2016
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service.

States increasingly are incorporating Kindergarten Entry Assessments (KEAs) into their comprehensive assessment systems with the goal of helping educators identify gaps in children's competencies, target instruction to children's individual needs, engage parents to better support their child's learning, and identify needs for expanding and improving early learning opportunities. In 2010, seven states collected KEA data for the purposes of aggregating data at the state level. By 2014, 29 states were engaged in development and use of KEAs with support from federal programs such as Race To the Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) grants and Enhanced Assessment Grants (EAG). This descriptive study examines the development and early implementation of KEAs in 12 districts across four RTT-ELC states (Maryland, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Washington) in the 2014-15 school year. This was the first year of KEA implementation in Maryland and Pennsylvania, the second year of implementation in Oregon, and the third year of KEA implementation in Washington, so findings reflect the early implementation of these assessments. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

get fulltext

14.

Results in brief: Preschool through third grade alignment and differentiated instruction: A literature review
United States. Department of Education. Policy and Program Studies Service, August, 2016
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service.

Research shows that participation in a high-quality preschool can improve young children's readiness skills for elementary school, positively influencing behavioral, social-emotional, and cognitive outcomes. Specifically, for children who may be at risk for academic challenges in early elementary school, attending a high-quality preschool can improve test scores and attendance, and it can reduce placement in special education and grade-level retention. However, some preschool program evaluations document that initial benefits may not persist into early elementary school. Some early childhood experts assert that the effects of preschool may diminish if curricula and instructional strategies from preschool through grade 3 are not well aligned. A second explanation for why initial benefits of preschool may not persist is that children who make early gains in preschool may not have the opportunity to maintain their growth rate or learning trajectory because early elementary instruction may focus on students who are less prepared and have low-level skills. This literature review aimed to better understand the research behind these two theories and focused on preschool and K-3 alignment and differentiated instruction in kindergarten and first grade. The review of differ entiated instruction excluded studies that focused exclusively on low-achieving students because of the priority on differentiated instruction as a way to help sustain the gains children make in preschool. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

get fulltext

15.

Toward the identification of features of effective professional development for early childhood educators: Literature review
United States. Department of Education. Policy and Program Studies Service, August 2010
Washington, DC: United States, Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service.

An exploration of goals for the professional development of early childhood educators, and an inquiry into effective practices for achieving these goals, based on a review of studies on professional development programs and their practices

Literature Review

get fulltext

16.

Toward the identification of features of effective professional development for early childhood educators: Literature review [Executive summary]
United States. Department of Education. Policy and Program Studies Service, 2010
Washington, DC: United States, Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service.

A summary of an exploration of goals for the professional development of early childhood educators, and an inquiry into effective practices for achieving these goals, based on a review of studies on professional development programs and their practices

Executive Summary

get fulltext

Select Citation

Search Feedback