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Current Filters: Author:Haskins, Ron [remove]; Publisher:National Institute for Early Education Research (U.S.) [remove];

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Coordinating America's highly diversified early childhood portfolio
Gilliam, Walter S., September, 2010
In R. Haskins & W. S. Barnett (Eds.), Investing in young children: New directions in federal preschool and early childhood policy (pp. 89-96). Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, Center on Children and Families.

A discussion of the coordination and integration of programs for preschool-age children to produce a more cohesive early childhood system

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Getting the most out of Early Head Start: What has been accomplished and what needs to be done
Love, John M., September, 2010
In R. Haskins & W. S. Barnett (Eds.), Investing in young children: New directions in federal preschool and early childhood policy (pp. 29-37). Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, Center on Children and Families.

A discussion of the impacts of Early Head Start on children at 2, 3, and 5 years old

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Head Start: Strategies to improve outcomes for children living in poverty
Ramey, Craig T., September, 2010
In R. Haskins & W. S. Barnett (Eds.), Investing in young children: New directions in federal preschool and early childhood policy (pp. 59-67). Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, Center on Children and Families.

A discussion of challenges that face the Head Start program and strategies to address them

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Investing in young children: New directions in federal preschool and early childhood policy
Haskins, Ron, September, 2010
Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, Center on Children and Families.

A discussion of the success of early childhood programs, including Early Head Start, Head Start, and home visiting programs, and policy recommendations for improving them

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Leave no (young) child behind: Prioritizing access in early childhood education
Ludwig, Jens, September, 2010
In R. Haskins & W. S. Barnett (Eds.), Investing in young children: New directions in federal preschool and early childhood policy (pp. 49-58). Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, Center on Children and Families.

A discussion of the tradeoffs between funding policies that expand access to early childhood programs and funding those that increase their cost and intensity

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New directions for America's early childhood policies
Haskins, Ron, September, 2010
In R. Haskins & W. S. Barnett (Eds.), Investing in young children: New directions in federal preschool and early childhood policy (pp. 1-27). Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, Center on Children and Families.

An overview of federal spending on early childhood programs and a summary of a discussion of the success of these programs and policy recommendations for improving them

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The Nurse-Family Partnership
Olds, David L., September, 2010
In R. Haskins & W. S. Barnett (Eds.), Investing in young children: New directions in federal preschool and early childhood policy (pp. 69-77). Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, Center on Children and Families.

The Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) is a program of prenatal and infancy home visiting by nurses for low-income first-time mothers. NFP nurses help parents improve 1) the outcomes of pregnancy by helping women improve their prenatal health; 2) children's subsequent health and development by helping parents provide competent infant and toddler care; and 3) parents' economic self-sufficiency by helping them complete their educations, find work, and plan future pregnancies. In three scientifically controlled trials the program produced benefits in each of these targeted areas. Today the NFP is serving over 20,000 families, and is likely to grow substantially with the support of health care reform. (author abstract)

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Strengthening home-visiting intervention policy: Expanding reach, building knowledge
Daro, Deborah, September, 2010
In R. Haskins & W. S. Barnett (Eds.), Investing in young children: New directions in federal preschool and early childhood policy (pp. 79-88). Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, Center on Children and Families.

Many argue that the expansion of home visitation should be built solely around programs that have been proven through carefully structured clinical trials that engage a well-specified target population. We believe this approach is valuable but insufficient to achieve the type of population-level change that such reforms generally promise. We propose a home-visitation policy framework that embeds high-quality targeted interventions within a universal system of support that begins with an assessment of all new parents. This assessment process would carry the triadic mission of assessing parental capacity, linking families with services commensurate with their needs, and learning to do better. (author abstract)

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Ten ideas for improving Early Head Start--and why the program needs them
Zill, Nicholas, September, 2010
In R. Haskins & W. S. Barnett (Eds.), Investing in young children: New directions in federal preschool and early childhood policy (pp. 39-48). Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, Center on Children and Families.

A discussion of ten ways to improve the Early Head Start program

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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