Browse the Collection

RC Produced by Research Connections
* Peer Reviewed Journal

63 results found.

Select Citation
Result
Resource Type
1.

Adapted Teaching Style Rating Scale
Raver, C. Cybele; Mattera, Shira K.; Greenberg, Mark T.; et al., 2012
New York: MDRC.

Instruments

get fulltext

2.

An analysis of the effects of an academic summer program for middle school students
Somers, Marie-Andree; Gooden, Susan; Welbeck, Rashida; et al., March, 2015
New York: MDRC.

This report examines the implementation and effects of the academic summer program for middle school students offered by Building Educated Leaders for Life (BELL). BELL's middle school program serves rising sixth- through eighth-grade students who are performing one to two years below grade level. The goals of the program are to increase student's literacy and math skills and to enhance their social development. To achieve these goals, BELL provides students with 6.5 hours of daily programming for approximately five weeks, five days per week. Several types of activities are provided: academic instruction in math and English Language Arts; social and academic enrichment activities; and field trips, guest speakers, and community service. BELL's contributions to summer learning began with its now well-established program for elementary school students. More recently, growing demand for programs serving older students has led BELL to expand into middle school. In this study, which is funded by the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation's Social Innovation Fund, the impact of BELL's middle school program was evaluated using a random assignment research design -- a lottery-like process used to assign eligible students either to a program group that was invited to participate in the BELL program or to a control group that was not. The study was conducted in summer 2012 in three school districts that were new partnerships for BELL. Due to various challenges related to student recruitment, the study's sample size is smaller than planned, and the margin of error around the impact findings is quite large. Even so, the results in this report can still be useful for generating suggestive or preliminary evidence about the potential effects of a full-day, academically oriented summer program model for middle school students. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

3.

The challenge of sustaining preschool impacts: Introducing ExCEL P-3, a study from the Expanding Children's Early Learning Network
McCormick, Meghan P.; Weiland, Christina; Bangser, Michael; et al., July, 2017
New York, NY: MDRC.

Early childhood interventions can be highly cost effective when positive impacts are sustained into adulthood. Yet while many recent preschool interventions have been found to have short-term effects on young children's language, literacy, mathematics, executive function, and social-emotional development, studies show that impacts on cognitive and academic skills tend to diminish in early elementary school -- a phenomenon commonly known as fade-out or convergence. There are a number of plausible hypotheses, but little hard evidence, on how to sustain the benefits of early childhood education. This brief introduces the ExCEL P-3 project, a study being done in partnership with the Boston Public Schools, the University of Michigan, and the Harvard Graduate School of Education, which aims to explore several leading approaches for sustaining children's early preschool gains. Two related ExCEL projects -- focusing on instructional quality (ExCEL Quality) and summer enrichment programs (ExCEL Summer) -- will be covered in later briefs in this series. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

get fulltext

4.

Child care and employment: Evidence from random assignment studies of welfare and work programs
Gennetian, Lisa A.; Michalopoulos, Charles, 2003
(Next Generation Working Paper Series No. 17). New York: MDRC.

An investigation into the effects of welfare reform policies and links between employment and child care choices, using data from random assignment pilot welfare programs begun between 1993 and 1996 in a variety of urban and rural areas in the United States

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

5.

Counting on early math skills: Preliminary kindergarten impacts of the Making Pre-K Count and High 5s programs
Mattera, Shira K.; Morris, Pamela A., February, 2017
New York, NY: MDRC.

The Making Pre-K Count and High 5s studies test two math programs to examine whether it is possible to improve children's early math abilities, and whether improvements in this "linchpin" outcome lead to impacts on children's other short- and longer-term outcomes. The current analysis examines the cumulative effects of both programs on children's math, language, and executive function skills in kindergarten. The Making Pre-K Count program entailed a comprehensive redesign of both the content and teaching of math in the prekindergarten (pre-K) classroom, and the High 5s program provided a second year of math enrichment for a subgroup of children who received Making Pre-K Count in preschool. High 5s was designed to build on children's pre-K experience using small-group math clubs -- in which a trained facilitator works with three to four children on fun math activities three times a week outside the classroom -- to supplement regular kindergarten instruction. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

6.

Can teacher training in classroom management make a difference for children's experience in preschool?: A preview of findings from the Foundations of Learning demonstration
Morris, Pamela A.; Lloyd, Chrishana M.; Raver, C. Cybele; et al., September, 2009
New York: MDRC.

Preliminary findings from Newark, New Jersey, sites of an implementation and random-assignment impact evaluation of Foundations of Learning (FOL), a preschool teacher training intervention to support children's behavioral and emotional development, that examined FOL effects on children's behavior and classroom management and instruction

Reports & Papers

7.

Cutting through complexity: Using behavioral science to improve Indiana's child care subsidy program
Dechausay, Nadine; Anzelone, Caitlin, September, 2016
(OPRE Report 2016-03). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project is the first major opportunity to use a behavioral economics lens to examine programs that serve poor and vulnerable families in the United States. Sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) of the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and led by MDRC, the project applies behavioral insights to issues related to the operations, implementation, and efficacy of social service programs and policies. The goal is to learn how tools from behavioral science can be used to deliver programs more effectively and, ultimately, improve the well-being of low-income children, adults, and families. This report describes a collaboration between the Indiana Office of Early Childhood and Out-of-School Learning (OECOSL) and the BIAS team. The OECOSL is the lead agency responsible for administering the state's Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), which provides child care subsidies to low-income parents who are working or in school. The CCDF has the dual goals of supporting parental employment and furthering children's development. Over a period of 19 months, the BIAS team designed and evaluated three behavioral interventions that aimed to improve outcomes at two important points in the child care program -- when parents enroll in the CCDF program and must select a child care provider, and when they renew their subsidies. The first intervention, which was launched statewide in June 2014 and ran through October 2014, focused on child care decision making among low-income parents. It aimed to increase the percentage of parents who used their CCDF subsidies to pay for highly rated providers in the state's quality rating and improvement system -- Paths to QUALITY (PTQ). The PTQ program ranks child care providers on a four-point scale based on standards related to health and safety, staff qualifications, parental engagement, and curriculum development. The OECOSL sought to increase the percentage of CCDF parents who selected PTQ providers, and to increase the number who chose highly rated providers (Levels 3 or 4). Two additional interventions, which ran from January through November 2014, focused on CCDF redetermination in Marion County, a large urban county that includes the city of Indianapolis. Parents had to verify their continued eligibility for child care subsidies at least every six months by submitting required documentation. The OECOSL aimed to use behavioral insights to encourage parents to attend their first scheduled appointment and to complete the process in one visit. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

8.

Cutting through complexity: Using behavioral science to improve Indiana's child care subsidy program
Dechausay, Nadine; Anzelone, Caitlin, September, 2016
(OPRE Report 2016-03). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project is sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation of the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The project, led by MDRC, aims to apply behavioral insights to issues related to the operations, implementation, and efficacy of selected programs and policies. This report describes a collaboration between the Indiana Office of Early Childhood and Out-of-School Learning (OECOSL) and the BIAS team. The OECOSL is the lead agency responsible for administering the state's Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), which provides child care subsidies to low-income parents who are working or in school. The BIAS team tested three behavioral interventions related to the CCDF program using random assignment. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

get fulltext

9.

Delivering on the promise of preschool: Investing in social and emotional development and early math skills
MDRC, February, 2013
New York: MDRC.

An overview of efforts to support the socioemotional development and early math skills of preschool-age children

Fact Sheets & Briefs

get fulltext

10.

Does child care assistance matter?: The effects of welfare and employment programs on child care for preschool- and young school-aged children
Crosby, Danielle A.; Gennetian, Lisa A.; Huston, Aletha C.; et al., 2001
(The Next Generation Working Paper Series No. 3). New York: MDRC.

An examination of the effects of welfare and employment policies on child care outcomes for single parents, and their preschool- to young school-aged children, using data from experimental programs implemented between the late 1980s and the mid-1990s

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

11.

Does child care assistance matter?: The effects of welfare and employment programs on child care for very young children
Gennetian, Lisa A.; Crosby, Danielle A.; Huston, Aletha C.; et al., 2001
(The Next Generation Working Paper Series No. 2). New York: MDRC.

An analysis of the effects of child care assistance on infant toddler child care use by low-income single-parent families, using data from five experimental evaluation studies of welfare and employment programs

Other

get fulltext

12.

Does child care assistance matter?: The effects of welfare and employment programs on child care use: Executive summary
MDRC, 2001
New York: MDRC.

A summary of an inquiry into the effects of child care assistance offered through welfare programs on the child care decisions made by parents, based on data gathered from low-income parents participating in 21 employment programs

Executive Summary

14.

The effects of welfare and employment policies on child care use by low-income young mothers
Gassman-Pines, Anna, 2003
(Next Generation Working Paper Series No. 19). New York: MDRC.

A study examining the welfare and employer child care policies on low income young mothers, using data from the National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies (NEWWS), Florida?s Family Transition Program (FTP) and the Minnesota?s Family Investment Program (MFIP)

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

15.

The effects of welfare policy on child care decisions: Evidence from ten experimental welfare-to-work programs
Robins, Philip K., 2003
(Next Generation Working Paper Series No. 18). New York: MDRC.

A study examining the child care choices made by families on welfare due to changes in welfare policies by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA)

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

16.

The effects of welfare reform policies on children: Lessons from MFIP (Minnesota Family Investment Program)
Gennetian, Lisa A.; Miller, Cynthia, 2000
New York: MDRC.

An overview of the Minnesota Family Investment Program (MFIP), which offered financial work incentives for single parents on welfare, with a summary of the program's effects on single mothers and their children

Fact Sheets & Briefs

17.

Engaging providers and clients: Using behavioral economics to increase on-time child care subsidy renewals
Mayer, Alexander K.; Calmeyer, Elizabeth; Patterson, Kelsey; et al., November, 2015
(OPRE Report 2015-73). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

This report presents findings from a study designed in partnership with the Oklahoma Department of Human Services (DHS) to increase the number of clients who renew their child care subsidy by their renewal deadline. The BIAS team and DHS designed three interventions to try to increase on-time renewals: one for DHS child care subsidy clients, one for child care providers who serve DHS clients, and one that combines the client and provider interventions. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

18.

Engaging providers and clients: Using behavioral economics to increase on-time child care subsidy renewals [Executive summary]
Mayer, Alexander K.; Calmeyer, Elizabeth; Patterson, Kelsey; et al., November, 2015
(OPRE Report 2015-73). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

This report presents findings from a study designed in partnership with the Oklahoma Department of Human Services (DHS) to increase the number of clients who renew their child care subsidy by their renewal deadline. The BIAS team and DHS designed three interventions to try to increase on-time renewals: one for DHS child care subsidy clients, one for child care providers who serve DHS clients, and one that combines the client and provider interventions. (author abstract)

Executive Summary

get fulltext

19.

Executive summary: An analysis of the effects of an academic summer program for middle school students
Somers, Marie-Andree; Gooden, Susan; Welbeck, Rashida; et al., March, 2015
New York: MDRC.

This report presents the findings from a study of the middle school academic summer program offered by Building Educated Leaders for Life (BELL). BELL's middle school program serves rising sixth- through eighth-graders who are identified by their school as performing one to two years below grade level, on average. The program operates five days a week for approximately five weeks during the summer. The program day is a traditional "full day" (6.5 hours), in which the morning is devoted to math and reading instruction and the afternoon provides enrichment through instruction in science, physical education, the arts, and other creative subjects -- except on Fridays, when there are guest speakers or field trips. (author abstract)

Executive Summary

get fulltext

20.

Executive summary: Cutting through complexity: Using behavioral science to improve Indiana's child care subsidy program
Dechausay, Nadine; Anzelone, Caitlin, September, 2016
(OPRE Report 2016-03). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project is the first major opportunity to use a behavioral economics lens to examine programs that serve poor and vulnerable families in the United States. Sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) of the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and led by MDRC, the project applies behavioral insights to issues related to the operations, implementation, and efficacy of social service programs and policies. The goal is to learn how tools from behavioral science can be used to deliver programs more effectively and, ultimately, improve the well-being of low-income children, adults, and families. This report describes a collaboration between the Indiana Office of Early Childhood and Out-of-School Learning (OECOSL) and the BIAS team. The OECOSL is the lead agency responsible for administering the state's Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), which provides child care subsidies to low-income parents who are working or in school. The CCDF has the dual goals of supporting parental employment and furthering children's development. Over a period of 19 months, the BIAS team designed and evaluated three behavioral interventions that aimed to improve outcomes at two important points in the child care program -- when parents enroll in the CCDF program and must select a child care provider, and when they renew their subsidies. The first intervention, which was launched statewide in June 2014 and ran through October 2014, focused on child care decision making among low-income parents. It aimed to increase the percentage of parents who used their CCDF subsidies to pay for highly rated providers in the state's quality rating and improvement system -- Paths to QUALITY (PTQ). The PTQ program ranks child care providers on a four-point scale based on standards related to health and safety, staff qualifications, parental engagement, and curriculum development. The OECOSL sought to increase the percentage of CCDF parents who selected PTQ providers, and to increase the number who chose highly rated providers (Levels 3 or 4). Two additional interventions, which ran from January through November 2014, focused on CCDF redetermination in Marion County, a large urban county that includes the city of Indianapolis. Parents had to verify their continued eligibility for child care subsidies at least every six months by submitting required documentation. The OECOSL aimed to use behavioral insights to encourage parents to attend their first scheduled appointment and to complete the process in one visit. (author abstract)

Executive Summary

get fulltext

21.

Executive summary: Using classroom management to improve preschoolers' social and emotional skills: Final impact and implementation findings from the Foundations of Learning demonstration in Newark and Chicago
Morris, Pamela A.; Leacock, Nicole; Bangser, Michael; et al., January, 2013
New York: MDRC.

A summary of findings from an evaluation of Foundations of Learning, a preschool teacher training intervention to support children's behavioral and emotional development, that examine program implementation, program impacts on classroom management and instruction and on children's behavior, and program costs and benefits, based on multiple sources of child, teacher, and classroom data collected at 71 randomly-assigned preschools in Newark, New Jersey, and Chicago, Illinois

Executive Summary

get fulltext

22.

Family and individual predictors of child care use by low-income families in different policy contexts
Huston, Aletha C.; Gennetian, Lisa A.; Chang, Young Eun; et al., 2002
(The Next Generation Working Paper Series No. 9). New York: MDRC.

A study of the impact of family and child characteristics on low income parents' use of child care, child care quality and receipt of child care subsidies.

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

23.

Family and individual predictors of child care use by low-income families in different policy contexts
Huston, Aletha C.; Gennetian, Lisa A.; Chang, Young Eun; et al.,
(Summary of Key Findings for Working Paper No. 9) New York: MDRC.

A summary of findings from an exploration of factors influencing the use of child care by low-income families

Other

get fulltext

24.

The Family Transition Program: Final report on Florida's initial time-limited welfare program
Bloom, Dan; Morris, Pamela A.; Kemple, James J.; et al., 2000
New York: MDRC.

Findings from a long-term assessment of the Family Transition Program (FTP) in Escambia County, Florida comparing FTP program participants to those participating in Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC)

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

25.

The Family Transition Program: Final report on Florida's initial time-limited welfare program [Executive summary]
Bloom, Dan; Morris, Pamela A.; Kemple, James J.; et al., 2000
New York: MDRC.

A summary of findings from a long-term assessment of the Family Transition Program (FTP) in Escambia County, Florida comparing FTP program participants to those participating in Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC)

Executive Summary

26.

The Family Transition Program: Final report on Florida's initial time-limited welfare program [Summary report]
Bloom, Dan; Morris, Pamela A.; Kemple, James J.; et al., 2000
New York: MDRC.

A brief report of findings from a long-term assessment of the Family Transition Program (FTP) in Escambia County, Florida comparing FTP program participants to those participating in Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC)

Other

get fulltext

27.

The Foundations of Learning demonstration: Making preschool more productive: How classroom management training can help teachers
Morris, Pamela A.; Jones, Stephanie M.; Lloyd, Chrishana M.; et al., November, 2010
New York: MDRC.

Findings from Newark, New Jersey, sites of an implementation and random-assignment impact evaluation of Foundations of Learning (FOL), a preschool teacher training intervention to support children's behavioral and emotional development, that examined FOL effects on classroom management and instruction and children's behavior

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

28.

The Foundations of Learning demonstration: Making preschool more productive: How classroom management training can help teachers: Executive summary
Morris, Pamela A.; Jones, Stephanie M.; Lloyd, Chrishana M.; et al., November, 2010
New York: MDRC.

A summary of findings from Newark, New Jersey, sites of an implementation and random-assignment impact evaluation of Foundations of Learning (FOL), a preschool teacher training intervention to support children's behavioral and emotional development, that examined FOL effects on classroom management and instruction and children's behavior

Executive Summary

get fulltext

29.

Growing Up in Poverty Project 
Fuller, Bruce,
Berkeley, CA: Policy Analysis for California Education

A longitudinal study of the effects of mothers moving from welfare-to-work on their economic well-being, home environment, child care quality and use, and their young children's early development

Major Research Projects

30.

How child care assistance in welfare and employment programs can support the employment of low-income families
Gennetian, Lisa A.; Crosby, Danielle A.; Huston, Aletha C.; et al., 2002
(Next Generation Working Paper Series No. 11). New York: MDRC.

An analysis of the effects of changes in child care policies on the child care choices of families participating in pilot welfare and employment programs from the late 1980s to the early 1990s

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

31.

The impact of family involvement on the education of children ages 3 to 8: A focus on literacy and math achievement outcomes and social-emotional skills
Van Voorhis, Frances L.; Epstein, Joyce Levy; Lloyd, Chrishana M.; et al., October, 2013
New York: MDRC.

This report summarizes research conducted primarily over the past 10 years on how families' involvement in children's learning and development through activities at home and at school affects the literacy, mathematics, and social-emotional skills of children ages 3 to 8. A total of 95 studies of family involvement are reviewed. These include both descriptive, nonintervention studies of the actions families take at home and at school and intervention studies of practices that guide families to conduct activities that strengthen young children's literacy and math learning. (author abstract)

Literature Review

get fulltext

32.

The impact of family involvement on the education of children ages 3 to 8: A focus on literacy and math achievement outcomes and social-emotional skills [Executive summary]
Van Voorhis, Frances L.; Epstein, Joyce Levy; Lloyd, Chrishana M.; et al., October, 2013
New York: MDRC.

To help answer these questions, this report summarizes the research conducted over the past 10 years on the effects of family involvement activities at home and at school on literacy, mathematics, and social-emotional skills for children ages 3 to 8. In addition, it provides new information on the impact of family involvement on these skills specifically for preschool children, and it pays special attention to the practices necessary to help prepare parents and children for the transition from preschool to kindergarten. Finally, this report identifies the gaps in knowledge that future research should address, and it discusses how to use research findings to inform and improve practice. (author abstract)

Executive Summary

get fulltext

33.

Instability in child care: Ethnographic evidence from working poor families in the New Hope intervention
Lowe, Edward D.; Weisner, Thomas S.; Geis, Sonya; et al., 2003
(Next Generation Working Paper Series No. 15). New York: MDRC.

A study of the influence of financial and material resources, social network supports, interpersonal balance in the family, family goals and values, and the stability of the daily routine in changes or stability in child care choices, using data from the New Hope intervention

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

34.

Jobs First: Final report on Connecticut's welfare reform initiative
Bloom, Dan; Morris, Pamela A.; Adams-Ciardullo, Diana; et al., 2002
New York: MDRC.

A study of the welfare form initiative, Job First program, imposing a statewide time limit on receipt of cash assistance and encouraging participation in employment-related services targeted toward quick job placement in Connecticut

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

35.

Jobs First: Final report on Connecticut's welfare reform initiative: Executive summary
Bloom, Dan; Morris, Pamela A.; Adams-Ciardullo, Diana; et al., 2002
New York: MDRC.

A summary of a study of the welfare reform initiative, Job First program, imposing a statewide time limit on receipt of cash assistance and encouraging participation in employment-related services targeted toward quick job placement in Connecticut

Executive Summary

get fulltext

36.

Jobs First: Final report on Connecticut's welfare reform initiative: Summary report
Bloom, Dan; Morris, Pamela A.; Adams-Ciardullo, Diana; et al., 2002
New York: MDRC.

A study of the welfare reform initiative, Job First program, imposing a statewide time limit on receipt of cash assistance and encouraging participation in employment-related services targeted toward quick job placement in Connecticut

Other

get fulltext

37.

Making child care choices: How welfare and work policies influence parents' decisions
Gennetian, Lisa A.; Weisner, Thomas S.; Crosby, Danielle A.; et al., 2002
(Next Generation Policy Brief). New York: MDRC.

A policy brief reviewing nine random assignment evaluations of the child care decisions made by approximately 20,000 low income parents

Fact Sheets & Briefs

get fulltext

38.

Making Pre-K Count: Improving math instruction in New York City
Morris, Pamela A.; Mattera, Shira K.; Maier, Michelle F.; et al., October, 2016
New York, NY: MDRC.

The Making Pre-K Count study addresses whether strengthening prekindergarten (pre-K) instruction in math, hypothesized to be a "linchpin" skill in children's development, can improve children's short- and longer-term learning. Specifically, the study rigorously evaluated the effect of an evidence-based math curriculum called Building Blocks along with ongoing training and in-classroom coaching, relative to the typical pre-K experience. Making Pre-K Count took place in 69 pre-K sites and over 170 classrooms across New York City. Thirty-five of the pre-K sites were assigned to receive the math curriculum, training, and coaching over two years (the "BB-MPC" group), while the other 34 were assigned to continue their typical programming (as the "pre-K-as-usual" group). Outcomes for children were assessed in the second year of the study, after teachers were familiar with the program. Over the course of the study, the typical pre-K experience in New York City was changing rapidly, with a new focus on the Common Core math standards and a major expansion into universal pre-K. This initial report provides early results on teachers and children at the end of pre-K during the second year of Making Pre-K Count implementation. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

39.

Making Pre-K Count: Improving math instruction in New York City: Executive summary
Morris, Pamela A.; Mattera, Shira K.; Maier, Michelle F.; et al., October, 2016
New York, NY: MDRC.

The Making Pre-K Count study addresses whether strengthening prekindergarten (pre-K) instruction in math, hypothesized to be a "linchpin" skill in children's development, can improve children's short- and longer-term learning. Specifically, the study rigorously evaluated the effect of an evidence-based math curriculum called Building Blocks along with ongoing training and in-classroom coaching, relative to the typical pre-K experience. Making Pre-K Count took place in 69 pre-K sites and over 170 classrooms across New York City. Thirty-five of the pre-K sites were assigned to receive the math curriculum, training, and coaching over two years (the "BB-MPC" group), while the other 34 were assigned to continue their typical programming (as the "pre-K-as-usual" group). Outcomes for children were assessed in the second year of the study, after teachers were familiar with the program. Over the course of the study, the typical pre-K experience in New York City was changing rapidly, with a new focus on the Common Core math standards and a major expansion into universal pre-K. This initial report provides early results on teachers and children at the end of pre-K during the second year of Making Pre-K Count implementation. (author abstract)

Executive Summary

get fulltext

40.

Multiple choices after school: Findings from the extended-service schools initiative
Grossman, Jean Baldwin; Jucovy, Linda; Walker, Karen E.; et al., 2002
New York: MDRC.

A study of the Extended-Service Schools Initiative, which supported the creation of 60 after-school programs in 20 communities around the country which adapted one of four out-of-school time models- the Beacon, Bridges to Success, Community Schools, and the West Philadelphia Improvement Corporation- to determine the characteristics of the children that attended these out-of-school programs, the high-quality activities offered at each, the benefits for participating youth, and the costs and financing surrounding these programs

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

41.

Multiple choices after school: Findings from the extended-service schools initiative: Executive summary
Grossman, Jean Baldwin; Jucovy, Linda; Walker, Karen E.; et al., 2002
Philadelphia: Public/Private Ventures.

A study of the Extended-Service Schools Initiative, which supported the creation of 60 after-school programs in 20 communities around the country which adapted one of four out-of-school time models- the Beacon, Bridges to Success, Community Schools, and the West Philadelphia Improvement Corporation- to determine the characteristics of the children that attended these out-of-school programs, the high-quality activities offered at each, the benefits for participating youth, and the costs and financing surrounding these programs

Executive Summary

42.

New Chance: Final report on a comprehensive program for young mothers in poverty and their children: Executive summary
Bos, Johannes M.; Quint, Janet C.; Polit, Denise F.; et al., 1997
New York: MDRC.

An examination of the impact on the long-term self-sufficiency and well-being of poor, young mothers and their children of New Chance, a voluntary demonstration project that provided comprehensive education, training, and other services

Executive Summary

get fulltext

43.

New hope for children and families: Five-year results of a program to reduce poverty and reform welfare: Executive summary
Huston, Aletha C.; Miller, Cynthia; Weisner, Thomas S.; et al., 2003
New York: MDRC.

A summary of research findings evaluating a program designed to assist low income people secure employment and reduce poverty

Executive Summary

get fulltext

44.

New hope for families and children: Five-year results of a program to reduce poverty and reform welfare
Huston, Aletha C.; Miller, Cynthia; Weisner, Thomas S.; et al., 2003
New York: MDRC.

An evaluation of a program designed to help low income families find and maintain employment, reduce poverty and improve overall family well-being

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

45.

New Hope for people with low incomes: Two-year results of a program to reduce poverty and reform welfare: Executive summary
Bos, Johannes M.; Brock, Tom; Duncan, Greg J.; et al., 1999
New York: MDRC.

An evaluation of Milwaukee?s New Hope project, which seeks to improve the lives and reduce the poverty of low-income workers and their families, comparing the employment, earnings, impact on parent-child relations, use of child care, and child outcomes of a group of New Hope participants with a control group excluded from such assistance

Executive Summary

46.

Out of their hands: Patching together care for children when parents move from welfare to work
Scott, Ellen K.; London, Andrew S.; Hurst, Allison; et al., 2003
(Next Generation Working Paper Series No. 16). New York: MDRC.

A study examining the behavior of single women moving from welfare to work as a result of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA), and their ability to find and provide child care during employment hours in Cleveland, Ohio

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

47.

Positive Behavior Scale
Quint, Janet C.; Bos, Johannes M.; Polit, Denise F.; et al., 1997
In New Chance: Final report on a comprehensive program for young mothers in poverty and their children. New York: MDRC.

Instruments

48.

Promoting preschool quality through effective classroom management: Implementation lessons from the Foundations of Learning demonstration
Lloyd, Chrishana M.; Bangser, Michael, December, 2009
New York: MDRC.

An examination of the impact of the implementation of the Foundations of Learning (FOL) program, a teacher-oriented classroom management intervention for preschool teachers that includes in-class clinical consultations, on teachers? ability to manage children?s behavior and deal with stress, based on data on a sample of teachers from 26 FOL demonstration classrooms and 25 control classrooms in Newark, New Jersey

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

49.

Promoting preschool quality through effective classroom management: Implementation lessons from the Foundations of Learning demonstration [Executive summary]
Lloyd, Chrishana M.; Bangser, Michael, December, 2009
New York: MDRC.

A summary of an examination of the impact of the implementation of the Foundations of Learning (FOL) program, a teacher-oriented classroom management intervention for preschool teachers that includes in-class clinical consultations, on teachers? ability to manage children?s behavior and deal with stress, based on data on a sample of teachers from 26 FOL demonstration classrooms and 25 control classrooms in Newark, New Jersey

Executive Summary

get fulltext

50.

Quantifying variation in Head Start effects on young children's cognitive and socio-emotional skills using data from the National Head Start Impact Study
Bloom, Howard S.; Weiland, Christina, March, 2015
New York: MDRC.

This paper uses data from the Head Start Impact Study (HSIS), a nationally representative multi-site randomized trial, to quantify variation in effects of Head Start during 2002-2003 on children's cognitive and socio-emotional outcomes relative to the effects of other local alternatives, including parent care. We find that (1) treatment and control group differences in child care and educational settings varied substantially across Head Start centers (program sites); (2) Head Start exhibited a compensatory pattern of program effects that reduced disparities in cognitive outcomes among program-eligible children; (3) Head Start produced a striking pattern of sub-group effects that indicates it substantially compensated dual language learners and Spanish-speaking children with low pretest scores (two highly overlapping groups) for their limited prior exposure to English; and (4) Head Start centers ranged from much more effective to much less effective than their local alternatives, including parent care. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

get fulltext

Select Citation

Search Feedback