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Carolina Abecedarian Project and the Carolina Approach to Responsive Education (CARE), Age 21 Follow Up Study
Campbell, Frances A., January, 2014
Campbell, Frances, and Elizabeth Pungello. Carolina Abecedarian Project (ABC) and the Carolina Approach to Responsive Education (CARE), Age 21 Follow Up Study, 1993 - 2003. ICPSR32262-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research[distributor], 2014-01-31. doi:10.3886/ICPSR32262.v1

The Carolina Abecedarian (ABC) Project and the Carolina Approach to Responsive Education (CARE) projects consist of two consecutive longitudinal studies on the effectiveness of early childhood educational intervention for children at high risk for developmental delays and school failure. Combined, the two studies test the hypothesis that child care, home visit, and home school resource interventions can enhance cognitive and academic outcomes for children at risk for school failure due to factors such as poverty, low maternal IQ, or low parental education. These studies provide the only experimental data regarding the efficacy of child care interventions that began during early infancy and lasted until the child entered kindergarten. In addition, the data allow for tests of the efficacy of intervention during the primary grades. Research hypotheses include: Within this high-risk sample, early cumulative risk will be negatively associated with young adult educational outcomes, employment outcomes, avoidance of teen parenthood, and avoidance of criminal behavior. Early intervention will moderate the effects of risk such that the effects of increased risk would be weaker for those who received the intervention than for those who did not. The early home environment would mediate any found effects for early risk and that early educational intervention would moderate the effects of the early home environment such that the effects of a poor-quality home environment would be weaker for those who received treatment compared to those who did not. Further information can be found on the Carolina Abecedarian Project Web site (http://abc.fpg.unc.edu/).

Data Sets


Child Care and Development Fund Administrative Data, Federal Fiscal Year 2010 (CCDF) [United States]
United States. Department of Health and Human Services, 2013
United States Department of Health and Human Services. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Child Care. Child Care and Development Fund Administrative Data, Federal Fiscal Year 2010. ICPSR34696-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2013-06-24. doi:10.3886/ICPSR34696.v1

This administrative dataset provides descriptive information about the families and children served through the federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF dollars are provided to states, territories, and tribes to provide assistance to low-income families receiving or transitioning from temporary public assistance, in obtaining quality child care so they can work, or depending on their state's policy, attend training or receive education.

Data Sets


Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Policies Database, 2012
Giannarelli, Linda, October, 2013
Giannarelli, Linda, Sarah Minton, Christin Durham, and United States Department of Health and Human Services. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Policies Database, 2012. ICPSR34902-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2013-10-17. doi:10.3886/ICPSR34902.v1

The CCDF Policies Database project is a comprehensive, up-to-date database of inter-related sources of CCDF policy information that support the needs of a variety of audiences through (1) Analytic Data Files and (2) a Book of Tables. These are made available to researchers, administrators, and policymakers with the goal of addressing important questions concerning the effects of alternative child care subsidy policies and practices on the children and families served, specifically parental employment and self-sufficiency, the availability and quality of care, and children's development.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2007
United States. Bureau of the Census, June, 2013
United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census, and United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2007. ICPSR21321-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-07-29. doi:10.3886/ICPSR21321.v1

This data collection is comprised of data from the 2007 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), and is a part of the Current Population Survey (CPS) Series. The Census Bureau conducts the ASEC (known as the Annual Demographic File prior to 2003) over a three-month period, in February, March, and April, with most of the data collected in the month of March. The ASEC uses two sets of survey questions, the basic CPS and a set of supplemental questions. The CPS, administered monthly, is a labor force survey providing current estimates of the economic status and activities of the population of the United States. Specifically, the CPS provides estimates of total employment (both farm and nonfarm), nonfarm self-employed persons, domestics, and unpaid helpers in nonfarm family enterprises, wage and salaried employees, and estimates of total unemployment. In addition to the basic CPS questions, respondents were asked questions from the ASEC, which provides supplemental data on poverty, geographic mobility/migration, and work experience. Comprehensive work experience information was given on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons aged 15 and over. Additional data for persons aged 15 and older were available concerning weeks worked and hours per week worked, reason not working full time, total income and supplemental income components. Additional data are included that cover training and assistance received under welfare reform programs such as job readiness training, child care services, or job skill training. Data covering nine noncash income sources: food stamps, school lunch program, employer-provided group health insurance plan, employer-provided pension plan, personal health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHAMPUS or military health care, and energy assistance are also included. Demographic variables include age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, veteran status, educational attainment, occupation, and income. Data on employment and income refer to the previous calendar year, although demographic data refer to the time of the survey. The original ASEC data provided by the Census Bureau are distributed in a hierarchical file structure, with three record types present: Household, Family, and Person. The ASEC is designed to be a multistage stratified sample of housing units, where the hierarchical file structure can be thought of as a person within a family within a household unit. Here the main unit of analysis is the household unit. For ease of analysis at the person-level, ICPSR created a rectangular file structure that contains a record for every person with the respective Household and Family variables prepended to the Person variables. Part 1 contains the rectangular data file and Part 2 contains the original hierarchical data file.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2010
United States. Bureau of the Census, June, 2013
United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census, and United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2010. ICPSR29652-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2010-11-22. doi:10.3886/ICPSR29652.v1

This data collection is comprised of data from the 2010 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), and is a part of the Current Population Survey (CPS) Series. The Census Bureau conducts the ASEC (known as the Annual Demographic File prior to 2003) over a three-month period, in February, March, and April, with most of the data collected in the month of March. The ASEC uses two sets of survey questions, the basic CPS and a set of supplemental questions. The CPS, administered monthly, is a labor force survey providing current estimates of the economic status and activities of the population of the United States. Specifically, the CPS provides estimates of total employment (both farm and nonfarm), nonfarm self-employed persons, domestics, and unpaid helpers in nonfarm family enterprises, wage and salaried employees, and estimates of total unemployment. In addition to the basic CPS questions, respondents were asked questions from the ASEC, which provides supplemental data on poverty, geographic mobility/migration, and work experience. Comprehensive work experience information was given on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons aged 15 and over. Additional data for persons aged 15 and older were available concerning weeks worked and hours per week worked, reason not working full time, total income and supplemental income components. Additional data are included that cover training and assistance received under welfare reform programs such as job readiness training, child care services, or job skill training. Data covering nine noncash income sources: food stamps, school lunch program, employer-provided group health insurance plan, employer-provided pension plan, personal health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHAMPUS or military health care, and energy assistance are also included. Demographic variables include age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, veteran status, educational attainment, occupation, and income. Data on employment and income refer to the previous calendar year, although demographic data refer to the time of the survey. The original ASEC data provided by the Census Bureau are distributed in a hierarchical file structure, with three record types present: Household, Family, and Person. The ASEC is designed to be a multistage stratified sample of housing units, where the hierarchical file structure can be thought of as a person within a family within a household unit. Here the main unit of analysis is the household unit.

Data Sets


Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES), 2009 Cohort
United States. Administration for Children and Families, June, 2013
United States Department of Health and Human Services. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES): 2009 Cohort [United States]. ICPSR34558-v1. [distributor], 2013-06-28. doi:10.3886/ICPSR34558.v1

The Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) is a periodic, ongoing longitudinal study of program performance. Successive nationally representative samples of Head Start children, their families, classrooms, and programs provide descriptive information on the population of children and families served; staff qualifications, credentials, and opinions; Head Start classroom practices and quality measures; and child and family outcomes. FACES includes a battery of child assessments across multiple developmental domains (cognitive, social, emotional, and physical).

Data Sets


The National Early Literacy Panel (NELP), 2002-2006
Westberg, Laura, August, 2013
Westberg , Laura. The National Early Literacy Panel (NELP), 2002-2006. ICPSR27421-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2013-08-22. doi:10.3886/ICPSR27421.v1

The National Early Literacy Panel (NELP) was convened in 2002 to conduct a synthesis of the scientific research on the development of early literacy skills in children ages zero to five. NELP met on 12 occasions between April 2002- February 2006. NELP's primary goal was to identify interventions, parenting activities, and instructional practices that promote the development of children's early literacy skills. Toward that end, the panel posed the following four questions: 1.What are the skills and abilities of young children (age birth through five years or kindergarten) that predict later reading, writing, or spelling outcome? 2.Which programs, interventions, and other instructional approaches or procedures have contributed to or inhibited gains in children's skills and abilities that are linked to later outcomes in reading, writing, or spelling? 3.What environments and settings have contributed to or inhibited gains in children's skills and abilities that are linked to later outcomes in reading, writing, or spelling? 4.What child characteristics have contributed to or inhibited gains in children's skills and abilities that are linked to later outcomes in reading, writing, or spelling? NELP adopted a methodology that allowed for the identification and selection of published studies relevant to the panel's questions, a coding system that allowed for the combination and comparison of studies, and an appropriate method of statistical analysis. Approximately 500 research articles that were used in the meta-analyses conducted by the panel. The meta-analyses summarized both correlational data showing the relationships between children's early abilities and skills and later literacy development and experimental data that showed the impact of instructional interventions on children's learning.

Data Sets


Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN): Antonucci Map, Wave 3, 2000-2002
Earls, Felton, June, 2013
Earls, Felton J., Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Robert J. Sampson. PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): ANTONUCCI MAP, WAVE 3, 2000-2002. ICPSR13674-v1. Boston, MA: Harvard Medical School [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-02-05. doi:10.3886/ICPSR13674.v1

The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as the personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. One such measure was the Antonucci Map. It was administered to subjects in Cohorts 3, 6, 9, and 12 and provided information regarding the subject's close friendships.

Data Sets


Third Grade Follow-up to the Head Start Impact Study (HSIS), 2007-2008
United States. Department of Health and Human Services, Spring 2014
Puma, Michael, Stephen Bell, Ronna Cook, and Camilla Heid. Third Grade Follow-up to the Head Start Impact Study (HSIS), 2007-2008, United States. ICPSR35003-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research[distributor], 2014-03-20. doi:10.3886/ICPSR35003.v1

The Head Start Impact Study is a national, longitudinal study that involves approximately 5,000 three and four year old preschool children across 84 nationally representative grantee/delegate agencies aimed at determining how Head Start affects the school readiness of children participating in the program as compared to children not enrolled in Head Start and under which conditions Head Start works best and for which children.

Data Sets


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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