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Carolina Abecedarian Project and the Carolina Approach to Responsive Education (CARE), Age 21 Follow Up Study
Campbell, Frances A., January, 2014
Campbell, Frances, and Elizabeth Pungello. Carolina Abecedarian Project (ABC) and the Carolina Approach to Responsive Education (CARE), Age 21 Follow Up Study, 1993 - 2003. ICPSR32262-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research[distributor], 2014-01-31. doi:10.3886/ICPSR32262.v1

The Carolina Abecedarian (ABC) Project and the Carolina Approach to Responsive Education (CARE) projects consist of two consecutive longitudinal studies on the effectiveness of early childhood educational intervention for children at high risk for developmental delays and school failure. Combined, the two studies test the hypothesis that child care, home visit, and home school resource interventions can enhance cognitive and academic outcomes for children at risk for school failure due to factors such as poverty, low maternal IQ, or low parental education. These studies provide the only experimental data regarding the efficacy of child care interventions that began during early infancy and lasted until the child entered kindergarten. In addition, the data allow for tests of the efficacy of intervention during the primary grades. Research hypotheses include: Within this high-risk sample, early cumulative risk will be negatively associated with young adult educational outcomes, employment outcomes, avoidance of teen parenthood, and avoidance of criminal behavior. Early intervention will moderate the effects of risk such that the effects of increased risk would be weaker for those who received the intervention than for those who did not. The early home environment would mediate any found effects for early risk and that early educational intervention would moderate the effects of the early home environment such that the effects of a poor-quality home environment would be weaker for those who received treatment compared to those who did not. Further information can be found on the Carolina Abecedarian Project Web site (http://abc.fpg.unc.edu/).

Data Sets


Third Grade Follow-up to the Head Start Impact Study (HSIS), 2007-2008
United States. Department of Health and Human Services, Spring 2014
Puma, Michael, Stephen Bell, Ronna Cook, and Camilla Heid. Third Grade Follow-up to the Head Start Impact Study (HSIS), 2007-2008, United States. ICPSR35003-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research[distributor], 2014-03-20. doi:10.3886/ICPSR35003.v1

The Head Start Impact Study is a national, longitudinal study that involves approximately 5,000 three and four year old preschool children across 84 nationally representative grantee/delegate agencies aimed at determining how Head Start affects the school readiness of children participating in the program as compared to children not enrolled in Head Start and under which conditions Head Start works best and for which children.

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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