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Child Care and Development Fund Administrative Data, Federal Fiscal Year 2005 (CCDF) [United States]
United States. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008
United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Child Care Bureau. CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND ADMINISTRATIVE DATA, FEDERAL FISCAL YEAR 2005 [Computer file]. ICPSR21401-v1. Rockville, MD: General Dynamics Information Technology [producer], 2007. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-02-11.

This administrative dataset provides descriptive information about the families and children served through the federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF dollars are provided to states, territories, and tribes to provide assistance to low-income families receiving or transitioning from temporary public assistance, in obtaining quality child care so they can work, or depending on their state's policy, attend training or receive education.

Data Sets


Child Care Market Rate Survey Practices and Policies of States, Territories and Tribes, 2005-2006
Grobe, Deana, 2008
Groebe, Deana, Clara C. Pratt, and Roberta B. Weber. Child Care Market Rate Survey Practices and Policies of States, Territories, and Tribes, 2005-2006 [Computer file]. ICPSR21402-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research/Ann Arbor, MI: [distributors].

The primary objective of this study was to describe current market rate survey methods, practices, and policies in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, five territories, and the 28 tribes that conduct their own market rate survey. A market rate survey is a tool to collect up-to-date information on what facilities, within given geographic areas, charge parents for various types of child care. A second objective was to identify the validity issues that emerge from this comparison of current market rate survey practices. Variables are organized under six specific functions representing the market rate survey process. These were: (1) administration/organization of the market rate survey, (2) facility population and sample, (3) data collection, (4) data analysis, (5) dissemination of the results and (6) rate setting policy.

Data Sets


Consequences of Childhood Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence in Chicago, Illinois, 1994-2000
University of Chicago, 2008
Emery, Clifton R. CONSEQUENCES OF CHILDHOOD EXPOSURE TO INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE IN CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, 1994-2000 [Computer file]. ICPSR20344-vl. Chicago, IL: Clifton R. Emery, University of Chicago [producer], 2006. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-04-15.

This data collection uses data from the first two waves of the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) and seeks to analyze the consequences of childhood exposure to intimate partner violence by measuring domestic violence exposure, the impact of exposure on the child's cognitive functioning, the behavioral impact of exposure to domestic violence, anxiety, and the parent-child relationship.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 1986: Match File: Alimony and Child Support
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2008
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, and U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, MARCH/APRIL 1986: MATCH FILE: ALIMONY AND CHILD SUPPORT [Computer file]. ICPSR04376-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census [producer], 1988. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-03-20. doi:10.3886/ICPSR04376

This data collection is comprised of responses from the March and April installments of the 1986 Current Population Survey (CPS). Both the March and April surveys used two sets of questions, the basic CPS and a separate supplement for each month.Information regarding child support and alimony was collected to determine the size and distribution of the female population with children affected by divorce or separation. Moreover, the data were collected to better understand the characteristics of persons requiring child support and alimony, and to help develop and maintain programs designed to assist in obtaining child support. These data highlight alimony and child support arrangements made at the time of separation or divorce, amount of payments actually received, and value and type of any property settlement.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 1988 Match Files: Alimony and Child Support
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2008
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, and U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, MARCH/APRIL 1988 MATCH FILES: ALIMONY AND CHILD SUPPORT [Computer file]. ICPSR04377-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Bureau of the Census [producer], 1990. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-03-20. doi:10.3886/ICPSR04377

This data collection is comprised of responses from the March and April installments of the 1988 Current Population Survey (CPS). Both the March and April surveys used two sets of questions, the basic CPS and a separate supplement for each month.Information regarding child support and alimony was collected to determine the size and distribution of the female population with children affected by divorce or separation. Moreover, the data were collected to better understand the characteristics of persons requiring child support and alimony, and to help develop and maintain programs designed to assist in obtaining child support. These data highlight alimony and child support arrangements made at the time of separation or divorce, amount of payments actually received, and value and type of any property settlement.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 1990 Match Files: Alimony and Child Support
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2008
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, and U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, MARCH/APRIL 1990 MATCH FILES: ALIMONY AND CHILD SUPPORT [Computer file]. ICPSR04378-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census [producer], 1991. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-03-11. doi:10.3886/ICPSR04378

This data collection is comprised of responses from the March and April installments of the 1990 Current Population Survey (CPS). Both the March and April surveys used two sets of questions, the basic CPS and a separate supplement for each month.Information regarding child support and alimony was collected to determine the size and distribution of the female population with children affected by divorce or separation. Moreover, the data were collected to better understand the characteristics of persons requiring child support and alimony, and to help develop and maintain programs designed to assist in obtaining child support. These data highlight alimony and child support arrangements made at the time of separation or divorce, amount of payments actually received, and value and type of any property settlement.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 1992 Match Files: Alimony and Child Support
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2008
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, and U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, MARCH/APRIL 1992 MATCH FILES: ALIMONY AND CHILD SUPPORT [Computer file]. ICPSR04380-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Bureau of the Census [producer], 1995. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-03-20. doi:10.3886/ICPSR04380

Information for this file was collected for Current Population Surveys in March and April, 1992. The March portion of this file, also known as the Annual Demographic File, provides the usual monthly labor force data, as well as supplemental data on work experience, income, noncash benefits, and migration. Comprehensive work experience information is given on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons 15 years old and over, as well as data concerning weeks worked and hours per week worked, reason for not working full-time, total income and income components, and residence on March 1, 1992. This file also contains data covering nine noncash income sources: food stamps, school lunch programs, employer-provided group health insurance and pension plans, personal health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHAMPUS or military health care, and energy assistance. Also included are demographic characteristics such as age, sex, race, household relationship, and Hispanic origin for each person in the household. The April portion of this file, the child support supplement, contains responses from all people 15 years of age and older, with children present in the household.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 2004 Match Files: Child Support Supplement
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2008
United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census, and United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Current Population Survey, March/April 2004 Match Files: Child Support Supplement [Computer file]. ICPSR04608-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-03-20. doi:10.3886/ICPSR04608

This data collection is comprised of responses from the March and April installments of the 2004 Current Population Survey (CPS). Both the March and April surveys used two sets of questions, the basic CPS and a separate supplement for each month. Information regarding child support was collected to determine the size and distribution of the population with children affected by divorce or separation, or other relationship status change. Moreover, the data were collected to better understand the characteristics of persons requiring child support, and to help develop and maintain programs designed to assist in obtaining child support. These data highlight alimony and child support arrangements made at the time of separation or divorce, amount of payments actually received, and value and type of any property settlement.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 2006 Match Files: Child Support Supplement
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2008
United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census, and United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Current Population Survey, March/April 2006 Match Files: Child Support Supplement [Computer file]. ICPSR21984-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-07-23. doi:10.3886/ICPSR21984

This data collection is comprised of responses from the March and April installments of the 2006 Current Population Survey (CPS). Both the March and April surveys used two sets of questions, the basic CPS and a separate supplement for each month. March supplement contains data covering nine noncash income sources: food stamps, school lunch program, employer-provided group health insurance plan, employer-provided pension plan, personal health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHAMPUS or military health care, and energy assistance. Questions covering training and assistance received under welfare reform programs, such as job readiness training, child care services, or job skill training were also asked in the March supplement.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, October 2005: School Enrollment
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2008
United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census, and United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Current Population Survey, October 2005: School Enrollment [Computer file]. ICPSR04567-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-04-04. doi:10.3886/ICPSR04567

This data collection is comprised of responses from two sets of survey questionnaires, the basic Current Population Survey (CPS) and a survey on the topic of School Enrollment in the United States, which was administered as a supplement to the October CPS. The October supplemental survey queried respondents on school enrollment for all persons in the household aged three and over. Information was collected on current grade at public or private school, whether attending college full- or part-time at a two-or four-year institution, year last attended a regular school, year graduated from high school, grade retention, library use, library accessibility, and resources for people with disabilities. Demographic variables include age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, veteran status, educational attainment, occupation, and income.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, October 2006: School Enrollment Supplement
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2008
United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census, and United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Current Population Survey, October 2006: School Enrollment Supplement [Computer file]. ICPSR21320-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-07-23. doi:10.3886/ICPSR21320

This data collection is comprised of responses from two sets of survey questionnaires, the basic Current Population Survey (CPS) and a survey on the topic of School Enrollment in the United States, which was administered as a supplement to the October CPS. The October supplemental survey queried respondents on school enrollment for all persons in the household aged three and over. Information was collected on current grade at public or private school, whether attending college full- or part-time at a two-or four-year institution, year last attended a regular school, year graduated from high school, grade retention, library use, library accessibility, and resources for people with disabilities. Demographic variables include age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, veteran status, educational attainment, occupation, and income.

Data Sets


Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES), 2003 Cohort
United States. Administration for Children and Families, 2008
U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services. Administration for Children and Families. HEAD START FAMILY AND CHILD EXPERIENCES (FACES) SURVEY, 2003 COHORT: [UNITED STATES] [Computer file]. ICPSR version. Rockville, MD: Westat, Inc. [producer], 2008. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008.

The Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) is an ongoing, national, longitudinal study of the cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development of Head Start children. It examines the characteristics, well-being, and accomplishments, of families, the observed quality of Head Start classrooms, and the characteristics and opinions of Head Start teachers and other program staff.

Data Sets


India Human Development Survey (IHDS), 2005
Desai, Sonalde, 30 July, 2008
Desai, Sonalde, Reeve Vanneman, and National Council of Applied Economic Research, New Delhi. India Human Development Survey (IHDS), 2005 [Computer file]. ICPSR22626-v7. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2010-03-25. doi:10.3886/ICPSR22626

The India Human Development Survey 2005 (IHDS) is a nationally representative, multi-topic survey of 41,554 households in 1,503 villages and 971 urban neighborhoods across India. Two one-hour interviews in each household covered topics concerning health, education, employment, economic status, marriage, fertility, gender relations, and social capital. Children aged 8-11 completed short reading, writing and arithmetic tests. Additional village, school, and medical facility interviews are also available.

Data Sets


National Health Interview Survey, 2005
National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.), 2008
U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, National Center for Health Statistics. NATIONAL HEALTH INTERVIEW SURVEY, 2005 [Computer file]. ICPSR04606-v1. Hyattsville, MD: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, National Center for Health Statistics [producer], 2006. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2006-12-21.

The purpose of the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is to obtain information about the amount and distribution of illness, its effects in terms of disability and chronic impairments, and the kinds of health services people receive. Of particular interest to child care and early education researchers is Part 5 of this dataset, the Sample Child File, which contains data on child health, child care access and utilization, child mental health, and child mental health services. The Child Conditions, Limitation of Activity and Health Status Section (CHS) of this file is consists of questions regarding mental retardation, developmental delays, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), Down?s syndrome, autism, and a number of other ailments and disorders, as well as a determination of school-loss days. The Child Health Care Access and Utilization Section (CAU) provides information on access to health care, dental care, and health care provider contact, such as having a usual place for sick and preventative care, change in place of care, reasons for a delay in getting medical care, and the inability to afford medical care, time since last dental visit, and visits and telephone contacts to or from medical doctors and other health care professionals. The Child Mental Health Brief Section (CMB) is a behavioral screening for children ages 4 to 17 years with data on the duration of a child?s problem and the impact that the problem has on the child and his/her family. Child Mental Health Services (CMS) section includes information about a health care provider visit for mental health services, medication prescribed for difficulties with concentration, hyperactivity orimpulsivity, receipt of any non-pharmacologic treatment or help for difficulties with concentration, hyperactivity or impulsivity, and the type of provider for this treatment, mental health private practice, clinic, or center. The Sample Child file also includes a Child Influenza Immunization Section (CFI) detailing information on receipt of a flu vaccination in the past 12 months and month and year of the most recent flu vaccination. In addition, Part 3, the Person Level file, contains information about children who receive special education or early intervention services and are limited in play activities. Other aspects of the Person Level file are described below. The 2005 NHIS also contains Household, Family, Person, and Sample Adult, as well as, Injury and Poison episode files and a Sample Adult Cancer file. Part 1, Household-level File, contains data on type of living quarters, number of families in the household responding and not responding, and the month and year of the interview for each sampling unit. Part 2, Family Level File, is made up of reconstructed variables from the person-level data of the basic module and includes demographic information and data on family size, major activities, health status, activity limits, and employment status. Part 3, Personal Level File, provides information on all family members with respect to health status, limitation of daily activities, cognitive impairment, and health conditions, doctor visits, hospital stays, and health care access and utilization. A randomly-selected adult in each family was interviewed for Part 4, Sample Adult File, regarding respiratory conditions, renal conditions, AIDS, joint symptoms, and other health related issues. Part 6, Injury/Poison Episode File, is an episode-based file that contains information about the external cause and nature of the injury or poisoning episode and what the person was doing at the time of the injury or poisoning episode. Part 7 is a verbatim file of the same episode, containing edited narrative text descriptions of the injury or poisoning. Part 8, Sample Adult Cancer File, examines diet, nutrition, physical activity, tobacco use, cancer screening, genetic testing, and family history.

Data Sets


National Health Interview Survey, 2006
National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.), 2008
U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, National Center for Health Statistics. NATIONAL HEALTH INTERVIEW SURVEY, 2006 [Computer file]. ICPSR20681-v1. Hyattsville, MD: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, National Center for Health Statistics [producer], 2007. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-11-01.

The purpose of the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is to obtain information about the amount and distribution of illness, its effects in terms of disability and chronic impairments, and the kinds of health services people receive. Of particular interest to child care and early education researchers is Part 5 of this dataset, the Sample Child File, which contains data on child health, child care access and utilization, child mental health, and child mental health services. The Child Conditions, Limitation of Activity and Health Status Section (CHS) of this file is constructed of questions regarding mental retardation, developmental delays, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), Down?s syndrome, autism, and a number of other ailments and disorders, as well as a determination of school-loss days. The Child Health Care Access and Utilization Section (CAU) provides information on access to health care, dental care, and health care provider contact, such as having a usual place for sick and preventative care, change in place of care, reasons for a delay in getting medical care, and the inability to afford medical care, time since last dental visit, and visits and telephone contacts to or from medical doctors and other health care professionals. The Child Mental Health Brief Section (CMB) is a behavioral screening for children ages 4 to 17 years with data on the duration of a child?s problem and the impact that the problem has on the child and his/her family. Child Mental Health Services (CMS) section includes information about a health care provider visit for mental health services, medication prescribed for difficulties with concentration, hyperactivity orimpulsivity, receipt of any non-pharmacologic treatment or help for difficulties with concentration, hyperactivity or impulsivity, and the type of provider for this treatment, mental health private practice, clinic, or center. The Sample Child file also includes a Child Influenza Immunization Section (CFI) detailing information on receipt of a flu vaccination in the past 12 months and month and year of the most recent flu vaccination. In addition Part 3 of this dataset, the Person Level File, contains information about children who receive special education or early intervention services as well as information regarding limitations in play activities for young children. Other aspects of the Person Level file are described below. The 2006 NHIS also contains Household, Family, Person, and Sample Adult files from the basic module, as well as Injury and Poison episode files. Part 1, Household Level File, contains data on type of living quarters, number of families in the household responding and not responding, and the month and year of the interview for each sampling unit. Part 2, Family Level File, is made up of reconstructed variables from the person-level data of the basic module and includes demographic information and data on family size, major activities, health status, activity limits, and employment status, along with industry and occupation. Part 3, Personal Level File, provides information on all family members with respect to health status, limitation of daily activities, cognitive impairment, and health conditions, doctor visits, hospital stays, and health care access and utilization. A randomly-selected adult in each family was interviewed for Part 4, Sample Adult File, regarding respiratory conditions, renal conditions, AIDS, joint symptoms, and other health related issues. Part 6, Injury/Poison Episode File, is an episode-based file that contains information about the external cause and nature of the injury or poisoning episode and what the person was doing at the time of the injury or poisoning episode, in addition to the date and place of occurrence. Part 7 is a verbatim file of the same episode, containing edited narrative text descriptions of the injury or poisoning.

Data Sets


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