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Current Filters: Pub Year:2005 [remove]; Publisher:Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [remove];

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Current Population Survey, March/April 1994 Match File: Child Support
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2005
U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Bureau of the Census. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, MARCH/APRIL 1994 MATCH FILE: CHILD SUPPORT [Computer file] ICPSR04147-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Bureau of the Census [producer], 2001. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-05-12. doi:10.3886/ICPSR04147

Information for this file was collected for Current Population Surveys in March and April, 1994. The March portion of this file, also known as the Annual Demographic File, provides the usual monthly labor force data, as well as supplemental data on work experience, income, noncash benefits, and migration. Comprehensive work experience information is given on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons 15 years old and over, as well as data concerning weeks worked and hours per week worked, reason for not working full-time, total income and income components, and residence on March 1, 1994. This file also contains data covering nine noncash income sources: food stamps, school lunch programs, employer-provided group health insurance and pension plans, personal health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHAMPUS or military health care, and energy assistance. Also included are demographic characteristics such as age, sex, race, household relationship, and Hispanic origin for each person in the household. The April portion of this file, the child support supplement, contains responses from all people 15 years of age and older, with children present in the household.

Data Sets


Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES), 1997 Cohort
United States. Administration for Children and Families, 2005
U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services. Administration for Children and Families. HEAD START FAMILY AND CHILD EXPERIENCES (FACES) SURVEY, 1997 COHORT: [UNITED STATES] [Computer file]. ICPSR version. Rockville, MD: Westat, Inc. [producer], 2005. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005.

The Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) is an ongoing, national, longitudinal study of the cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development of Head Start children. It examines the characteristics, well-being, and accomplishments, of families, the observed quality of Head Start classrooms, and the characteristics and opinions of Head Start teachers and other program staff.

Data Sets


Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES), 2000 Cohort
United States. Administration for Children and Families, 2005
U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services. Administration for Children and Families. HEAD START FAMILY AND CHILD EXPERIENCES (FACES) SURVEY, 2000 COHORT: [UNITED STATES] [Computer file]. ICPSR version. Rockville, MD: Westat, Inc. [producer], 2005. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005.

The Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) is an ongoing, national, longitudinal study of the cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development of Head Start children. It examines the characteristics, well-being, and accomplishments, of families, the observed quality of Head Start classrooms, and the characteristics and opinions of Head Start teachers and other program staff.

Data Sets


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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