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Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2006
United States. Bureau of the Census, 02 March, 2009
United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census, and United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2006. ICPSR04559-v3. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2009-03-02. doi:10.3886/ICPSR04559.v3

This data collection is comprised of data from the 2006 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), and is a part of the Current Population Survey (CPS) Series. The Census Bureau conducts the ASEC (known as the Annual Demographic File prior to 2003) over a three-month period, in February, March, and April, with most of the data collected in the month of March. The ASEC uses two sets of survey questions, the basic CPS and a set of supplemental questions. The CPS, administered monthly, is a labor force survey providing current estimates of the economic status and activities of the population of the United States. Specifically, the CPS provides estimates of total employment (both farm and nonfarm), nonfarm self-employed persons, domestics, and unpaid helpers in nonfarm family enterprises, wage and salaried employees, and estimates of total unemployment. In addition to the basic CPS questions, respondents were asked questions from the ASEC, which provides supplemental data on poverty, geographic mobility/migration, and work experience. Comprehensive work experience information was given on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons aged 15 and over. Additional data for persons aged 15 and older were available concerning weeks worked and hours per week worked, reason not working full time, total income and supplemental income components. Additional data are included that cover training and assistance received under welfare reform programs such as job readiness training, child care services, or job skill training. Data covering nine noncash income sources: food stamps, school lunch program, employer-provided group health insurance plan, employer-provided pension plan, personal health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHAMPUS or military health care, and energy assistance are also included. Demographic variables include age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, veteran status, educational attainment, occupation, and income. Data on employment and income refer to the previous calendar year, although demographic data refer to the time of the survey. The original ASEC data provided by the Census Bureau are distributed in a hierarchical file structure, with three record types present: Household, Family, and Person. The ASEC is designed to be a multistage stratified sample of housing units, where the hierarchical file structure can be thought of as a person within a family within a household unit. Here the main unit of analysis is the household unit. For ease of analysis at the person-level, ICPSR created a rectangular file structure that contains a record for every person with the respective Household and Family variables prepended to the Person variables. Part 1 contains the rectangular data file and Part 2 contains the original hierarchical data file.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2007
United States. Bureau of the Census, June, 2013
United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census, and United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2007. ICPSR21321-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-07-29. doi:10.3886/ICPSR21321.v1

This data collection is comprised of data from the 2007 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), and is a part of the Current Population Survey (CPS) Series. The Census Bureau conducts the ASEC (known as the Annual Demographic File prior to 2003) over a three-month period, in February, March, and April, with most of the data collected in the month of March. The ASEC uses two sets of survey questions, the basic CPS and a set of supplemental questions. The CPS, administered monthly, is a labor force survey providing current estimates of the economic status and activities of the population of the United States. Specifically, the CPS provides estimates of total employment (both farm and nonfarm), nonfarm self-employed persons, domestics, and unpaid helpers in nonfarm family enterprises, wage and salaried employees, and estimates of total unemployment. In addition to the basic CPS questions, respondents were asked questions from the ASEC, which provides supplemental data on poverty, geographic mobility/migration, and work experience. Comprehensive work experience information was given on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons aged 15 and over. Additional data for persons aged 15 and older were available concerning weeks worked and hours per week worked, reason not working full time, total income and supplemental income components. Additional data are included that cover training and assistance received under welfare reform programs such as job readiness training, child care services, or job skill training. Data covering nine noncash income sources: food stamps, school lunch program, employer-provided group health insurance plan, employer-provided pension plan, personal health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHAMPUS or military health care, and energy assistance are also included. Demographic variables include age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, veteran status, educational attainment, occupation, and income. Data on employment and income refer to the previous calendar year, although demographic data refer to the time of the survey. The original ASEC data provided by the Census Bureau are distributed in a hierarchical file structure, with three record types present: Household, Family, and Person. The ASEC is designed to be a multistage stratified sample of housing units, where the hierarchical file structure can be thought of as a person within a family within a household unit. Here the main unit of analysis is the household unit. For ease of analysis at the person-level, ICPSR created a rectangular file structure that contains a record for every person with the respective Household and Family variables prepended to the Person variables. Part 1 contains the rectangular data file and Part 2 contains the original hierarchical data file.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2008
United States. Bureau of the Census, 22 November, 2010
United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census, and United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2008. ICPSR23440-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2010-11-22. doi:10.3886/ICPSR23440.v1

This data collection is comprised of data from the 2008 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), and is a part of the Current Population Survey (CPS) Series. The Census Bureau conducts the ASEC (known as the Annual Demographic File prior to 2003) over a three-month period, in February, March, and April, with most of the data collected in the month of March. The ASEC uses two sets of survey questions, the basic CPS and a set of supplemental questions. The CPS, administered monthly, is a labor force survey providing current estimates of the economic status and activities of the population of the United States. Specifically, the CPS provides estimates of total employment (both farm and nonfarm), nonfarm self-employed persons, domestics, and unpaid helpers in nonfarm family enterprises, wage and salaried employees, and estimates of total unemployment. In addition to the basic CPS questions, respondents were asked questions from the ASEC, which provides supplemental data on poverty, geographic mobility/migration, and work experience. Comprehensive work experience information was given on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons aged 15 and over. Additional data for persons aged 15 and older were available concerning weeks worked and hours per week worked, reason not working full time, total income and supplemental income components. Additional data are included that cover training and assistance received under welfare reform programs such as job readiness training, child care services, or job skill training. Data covering nine noncash income sources: food stamps, school lunch program, employer-provided group health insurance plan, employer-provided pension plan, personal health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHAMPUS or military health care, and energy assistance are also included. Demographic variables include age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, veteran status, educational attainment, occupation, and income. Data on employment and income refer to the previous calendar year, although demographic data refer to the time of the survey. The original ASEC data provided by the Census Bureau are distributed in a hierarchical file structure, with three record types present: Household, Family, and Person. The ASEC is designed to be a multistage stratified sample of housing units, where the hierarchical file structure can be thought of as a person within a family within a household unit. Here the main unit of analysis is the household unit.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2009
United States. Bureau of the Census, 22 November, 2010
United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census, and United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2009. ICPSR29642-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2010-11-22. doi:10.3886/ICPSR29642.v1

This data collection is comprised of data from the 2009 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), and is a part of the Current Population Survey (CPS) Series. The Census Bureau conducts the ASEC (known as the Annual Demographic File prior to 2003) over a three-month period, in February, March, and April, with most of the data collected in the month of March. The ASEC uses two sets of survey questions, the basic CPS and a set of supplemental questions. The CPS, administered monthly, is a labor force survey providing current estimates of the economic status and activities of the population of the United States. Specifically, the CPS provides estimates of total employment (both farm and nonfarm), nonfarm self-employed persons, domestics, and unpaid helpers in nonfarm family enterprises, wage and salaried employees, and estimates of total unemployment. In addition to the basic CPS questions, respondents were asked questions from the ASEC, which provides supplemental data on poverty, geographic mobility/migration, and work experience. Comprehensive work experience information was given on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons aged 15 and over. Additional data for persons aged 15 and older were available concerning weeks worked and hours per week worked, reason not working full time, total income and supplemental income components. Additional data are included that cover training and assistance received under welfare reform programs such as job readiness training, child care services, or job skill training. Data covering nine noncash income sources: food stamps, school lunch program, employer-provided group health insurance plan, employer-provided pension plan, personal health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHAMPUS or military health care, and energy assistance are also included. Demographic variables include age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, veteran status, educational attainment, occupation, and income. Data on employment and income refer to the previous calendar year, although demographic data refer to the time of the survey. The original ASEC data provided by the Census Bureau are distributed in a hierarchical file structure, with three record types present: Household, Family, and Person. The ASEC is designed to be a multistage stratified sample of housing units, where the hierarchical file structure can be thought of as a person within a family within a household unit. Here the main unit of analysis is the household unit.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2010
United States. Bureau of the Census, June, 2013
United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census, and United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2010. ICPSR29652-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2010-11-22. doi:10.3886/ICPSR29652.v1

This data collection is comprised of data from the 2010 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), and is a part of the Current Population Survey (CPS) Series. The Census Bureau conducts the ASEC (known as the Annual Demographic File prior to 2003) over a three-month period, in February, March, and April, with most of the data collected in the month of March. The ASEC uses two sets of survey questions, the basic CPS and a set of supplemental questions. The CPS, administered monthly, is a labor force survey providing current estimates of the economic status and activities of the population of the United States. Specifically, the CPS provides estimates of total employment (both farm and nonfarm), nonfarm self-employed persons, domestics, and unpaid helpers in nonfarm family enterprises, wage and salaried employees, and estimates of total unemployment. In addition to the basic CPS questions, respondents were asked questions from the ASEC, which provides supplemental data on poverty, geographic mobility/migration, and work experience. Comprehensive work experience information was given on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons aged 15 and over. Additional data for persons aged 15 and older were available concerning weeks worked and hours per week worked, reason not working full time, total income and supplemental income components. Additional data are included that cover training and assistance received under welfare reform programs such as job readiness training, child care services, or job skill training. Data covering nine noncash income sources: food stamps, school lunch program, employer-provided group health insurance plan, employer-provided pension plan, personal health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHAMPUS or military health care, and energy assistance are also included. Demographic variables include age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, veteran status, educational attainment, occupation, and income. Data on employment and income refer to the previous calendar year, although demographic data refer to the time of the survey. The original ASEC data provided by the Census Bureau are distributed in a hierarchical file structure, with three record types present: Household, Family, and Person. The ASEC is designed to be a multistage stratified sample of housing units, where the hierarchical file structure can be thought of as a person within a family within a household unit. Here the main unit of analysis is the household unit.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Survey, 2005
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2006
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY: ANNUAL SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC (ASEC) SURVEY, 2005 [Computer file]. ICPSR04312-v2. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census [producer], 2005. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-11-22.

This data collection supplies standard monthly labor force data as well as supplemental data on work experience, income, noncash benefits, and migration.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 1982 Match Files: Alimony and Child Support
United States. Bureau of the Census, 1984
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, MARCH/APRIL 1982 MATCH FILES: ALIMONY AND CHILD SUPPORT [Computer file]. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census [producer], 1983. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1984. doi:10.3886/ICPSR08267

This data collection supplies standard monthly labor force data for the week prior to the survey. Comprehensive information is given on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons 14 years old and older. Additional data for persons aged 15 years old and older are available concerning weeks worked, hours per week worked, reason not working full-time, total income and income components, and residence. This match file is comprised of records for six rotation groups common to the March and April 1982 Current Population Surveys. Data on alimony and child support are collected from the April supplement for females 18 years old and older. These data highlight alimony and child support arrangements made at the time of separation or divorce, amount of payments actually received, and value and type of any property settlement. Information on demographic characteristics, such as age, sex, race, marital status, veteran status, household relationship, educational attainment, and Hispanic origin, is available for each person in the household enumerated. Data on employment and income refer to the previous year, while demographic data refer to the time of the survey.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 1984 Match Files: Alimony and Child Support
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2006
U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Bureau of the Census. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, MARCH/APRIL 1984 MATCH FILES: ALIMONY AND CHILD SUPPORT [Computer file]. ICPSR04374-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Bureau of the Census [producer], 1986. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2006-08-09. doi:10.3886/ICPSR04374

The file comprises records for the six rotation groups common to the March and April 1984 Current Population Surveys. For females aged 18 years and over, data are provided on alimony and child support collected from the April supplement. These data highlight alimony and child support arrangements made at the time of separation or divorce, amount of payments actually received, and value and type of any property settlement. This file also provides the usual monthly labor force data plus data on work experience, income, and migration. Comprehensive information is given on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons aged 14 years and over. Additional data for persons aged 15 years and older are available concerning weeks worked and hours per week worked, reason not working full time, total income and income components, and residence on March 1, 1983. Characteristics such as age, sex, race, household relationship, and Spanish origin are shown for each person in the household enumerated. The data on employment and income refer to the preceding year, although demographic data refer to the time of the survey. This file also contains data covering nine noncash income sources: food stamps, school lunch program, employer-provided group health insurance, employer-provided pension plan, personal health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHAMPUS or military health care, and energy assistance.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 1986: Match File: Alimony and Child Support
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2008
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, and U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, MARCH/APRIL 1986: MATCH FILE: ALIMONY AND CHILD SUPPORT [Computer file]. ICPSR04376-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census [producer], 1988. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-03-20. doi:10.3886/ICPSR04376

This data collection is comprised of responses from the March and April installments of the 1986 Current Population Survey (CPS). Both the March and April surveys used two sets of questions, the basic CPS and a separate supplement for each month.Information regarding child support and alimony was collected to determine the size and distribution of the female population with children affected by divorce or separation. Moreover, the data were collected to better understand the characteristics of persons requiring child support and alimony, and to help develop and maintain programs designed to assist in obtaining child support. These data highlight alimony and child support arrangements made at the time of separation or divorce, amount of payments actually received, and value and type of any property settlement.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 1988 Match Files: Alimony and Child Support
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2008
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, and U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, MARCH/APRIL 1988 MATCH FILES: ALIMONY AND CHILD SUPPORT [Computer file]. ICPSR04377-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Bureau of the Census [producer], 1990. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-03-20. doi:10.3886/ICPSR04377

This data collection is comprised of responses from the March and April installments of the 1988 Current Population Survey (CPS). Both the March and April surveys used two sets of questions, the basic CPS and a separate supplement for each month.Information regarding child support and alimony was collected to determine the size and distribution of the female population with children affected by divorce or separation. Moreover, the data were collected to better understand the characteristics of persons requiring child support and alimony, and to help develop and maintain programs designed to assist in obtaining child support. These data highlight alimony and child support arrangements made at the time of separation or divorce, amount of payments actually received, and value and type of any property settlement.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 1990 Match Files: Alimony and Child Support
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2008
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, and U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, MARCH/APRIL 1990 MATCH FILES: ALIMONY AND CHILD SUPPORT [Computer file]. ICPSR04378-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census [producer], 1991. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-03-11. doi:10.3886/ICPSR04378

This data collection is comprised of responses from the March and April installments of the 1990 Current Population Survey (CPS). Both the March and April surveys used two sets of questions, the basic CPS and a separate supplement for each month.Information regarding child support and alimony was collected to determine the size and distribution of the female population with children affected by divorce or separation. Moreover, the data were collected to better understand the characteristics of persons requiring child support and alimony, and to help develop and maintain programs designed to assist in obtaining child support. These data highlight alimony and child support arrangements made at the time of separation or divorce, amount of payments actually received, and value and type of any property settlement.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 1992 Match Files: Alimony and Child Support
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2008
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, and U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, MARCH/APRIL 1992 MATCH FILES: ALIMONY AND CHILD SUPPORT [Computer file]. ICPSR04380-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Bureau of the Census [producer], 1995. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-03-20. doi:10.3886/ICPSR04380

Information for this file was collected for Current Population Surveys in March and April, 1992. The March portion of this file, also known as the Annual Demographic File, provides the usual monthly labor force data, as well as supplemental data on work experience, income, noncash benefits, and migration. Comprehensive work experience information is given on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons 15 years old and over, as well as data concerning weeks worked and hours per week worked, reason for not working full-time, total income and income components, and residence on March 1, 1992. This file also contains data covering nine noncash income sources: food stamps, school lunch programs, employer-provided group health insurance and pension plans, personal health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHAMPUS or military health care, and energy assistance. Also included are demographic characteristics such as age, sex, race, household relationship, and Hispanic origin for each person in the household. The April portion of this file, the child support supplement, contains responses from all people 15 years of age and older, with children present in the household.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 1994 Match File: Child Support
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2005
U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Bureau of the Census. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, MARCH/APRIL 1994 MATCH FILE: CHILD SUPPORT [Computer file] ICPSR04147-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Bureau of the Census [producer], 2001. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-05-12. doi:10.3886/ICPSR04147

Information for this file was collected for Current Population Surveys in March and April, 1994. The March portion of this file, also known as the Annual Demographic File, provides the usual monthly labor force data, as well as supplemental data on work experience, income, noncash benefits, and migration. Comprehensive work experience information is given on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons 15 years old and over, as well as data concerning weeks worked and hours per week worked, reason for not working full-time, total income and income components, and residence on March 1, 1994. This file also contains data covering nine noncash income sources: food stamps, school lunch programs, employer-provided group health insurance and pension plans, personal health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHAMPUS or military health care, and energy assistance. Also included are demographic characteristics such as age, sex, race, household relationship, and Hispanic origin for each person in the household. The April portion of this file, the child support supplement, contains responses from all people 15 years of age and older, with children present in the household.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 1996 Match File: Child Support
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2006
U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Bureau of the Census. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, MARCH/APRIL 1996 MATCH FILE: CHILD SUPPORT [Computer file]. ICPSR04148-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census [producer], 2001. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-12-15.

The main purpose of the survey is to collect information on the employment situation, a very important secondary purpose is to collect information on the demographic status of the population, information such as age, sex, race, marital status, educational attainment, and family structure. From time to time additional questions are included on such important subjects as health, education, income, and previous work experience. The statistics resulting from these questions serve to update similar information collected once every 10 years through the decennial census, and are used by Government policymakers and legislators as important indicators of our Nation's economic situation and for planning and evaluating many government programs.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 1998 Match File: Child Support
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2006
U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Bureau of the Census. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, MARCH/APRIL 1998 MATCH FILE: CHILD SUPPORT [Computer file]. ICPSR04175-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Bureau of the Census [producer], 2001. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-12-15.

Information for this file was collected for Current Population Surveys in March and April, 1994. The March portion of this file, also known as the Annual Demographic File, provides the usual monthly labor force data, as well as supplemental data on work experience, income, noncash benefits, and migration.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 2000 Match File: Child Support
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2006
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, MARCH/APRIL 2000 MATCH FILE: CHILD SUPPORT [Computer file]. ICPSR04244-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Bureau of the Census [producer], 2005. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2006-01-06.

Information for this file was collected for Current Population Surveys in March and April, 2000. The March portion of this file, also known as the Annual Demographic File, provides the usual monthly labor force data, as well as supplemental data on work experience, income, noncash benefits, and migration.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 2002 Match File: Child Support
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2006
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, MARCH/APRIL 2002 MATCH FILE: CHILD SUPPORT [Computer file]. ICPSR04246-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce. Bureau of the Census [producer], 2005. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2006-03-06.

Information for this file was collected for Current Population Surveys in March and April, 2002. The March portion of this file, also known as the Annual Demographic File, provides the usual monthly labor force data, as well as supplemental data on work experience, income, noncash benefits, and migration.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 2004 Match Files: Child Support Supplement
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2008
United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census, and United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Current Population Survey, March/April 2004 Match Files: Child Support Supplement [Computer file]. ICPSR04608-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-03-20. doi:10.3886/ICPSR04608

This data collection is comprised of responses from the March and April installments of the 2004 Current Population Survey (CPS). Both the March and April surveys used two sets of questions, the basic CPS and a separate supplement for each month. Information regarding child support was collected to determine the size and distribution of the population with children affected by divorce or separation, or other relationship status change. Moreover, the data were collected to better understand the characteristics of persons requiring child support, and to help develop and maintain programs designed to assist in obtaining child support. These data highlight alimony and child support arrangements made at the time of separation or divorce, amount of payments actually received, and value and type of any property settlement.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 2006 Match Files: Child Support Supplement
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2008
United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census, and United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Current Population Survey, March/April 2006 Match Files: Child Support Supplement [Computer file]. ICPSR21984-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-07-23. doi:10.3886/ICPSR21984

This data collection is comprised of responses from the March and April installments of the 2006 Current Population Survey (CPS). Both the March and April surveys used two sets of questions, the basic CPS and a separate supplement for each month. March supplement contains data covering nine noncash income sources: food stamps, school lunch program, employer-provided group health insurance plan, employer-provided pension plan, personal health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHAMPUS or military health care, and energy assistance. Questions covering training and assistance received under welfare reform programs, such as job readiness training, child care services, or job skill training were also asked in the March supplement.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, March/April 2008 Match Files: Child Support Supplement
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2010
United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census, United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and United States Department of Health and Human Services. Current Population Survey, March/April 2008 Match Files: Child Support Supplement [Computer file]. ICPSR29646-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2010-12-06. doi:10.3886/ICPSR29646

Information for this file was collected for Current Population Surveys in March and April, 2008. The March portion of this file, also known as the Annual Demographic File, provides the usual monthly labor force data, as well as supplemental data on work experience, income, noncash benefits, and migration.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, October 1968: School Enrollment
United States. Bureau of the Census, 1991
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, OCTOBER 1968: SCHOOL ENROLLMENT [Computer file]. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census [producer], 1968. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1991. doi:10.3886/ICPSR09546

Data on labor force activity for the week prior to the survey are supplied in this collection. Information is available on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons 14 years old and over. Demographic variables such as age, sex, race, marital status, veteran status, household relationship, educational background, and Spanish origin are included. In addition to providing these core data, the October survey also contains a special supplement on school enrollment. This supplement includes the following items: current grade attending at public or private school, whether attending college full- or part-time at a two- or four-year institution, year last attended a regular school, and year graduated from high school.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, October 1969: School Enrollment
United States. Bureau of the Census, 1992
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, OCTOBER 1969: SCHOOL ENROLLMENT [Computer file]. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census [producer], 1980. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1992. doi:10.3886/ICPSR09547

Data on labor force activity for the week prior to the survey are supplied in this collection. Information is available on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons 14 years old and over. Demographic variables such as age, sex, race, marital status, veteran status, household relationship, educational background, and Spanish origin are included. In addition to providing these core data, the collection also contains a special supplement on school enrollment that includes the following items: current grade attending at public or private school, whether attending college full- or part-time at a two- or four-year institution, year last attended a regular school, and year graduated from high school.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, October 1970: School Enrollment
United States. Bureau of the Census, 1991
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, OCTOBER 1970: SCHOOL ENROLLMENT [Computer file]. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census [producer], 1983. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1991. doi:10.3886/ICPSR09544

Data on labor force activity for the week prior to the survey are supplied in this collection. Information is available on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons 14 years old and over. Demographic variables such as age, sex, race, marital status, veteran status, household relationship, educational background, and Spanish origin are included. In addition to providing these core data, the October survey also contains a special supplement on school enrollment for persons 3 years old and over. This supplement includes the following items: current grade attending at public or private school, whether attending college full- or part-time at a two- or four-year institution, year last attended a regular school, and year graduated from high school.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, October 1971: School Enrollment
United States. Bureau of the Census, 1991
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, OCTOBER 1971: SCHOOL ENROLLMENT [Computer file]. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census [producer], 1983. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1991. doi:10.3886/ICPSR09545

Data on labor force activity for the week prior to the survey are supplied in this collection. Information is available on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons 14 years old and over. Demographic variables such as age, sex, race, marital status, veteran status, household relationship, educational background, and Spanish origin are included. In addition to providing these core data, the October survey also contains a special supplement on school enrollment for persons 3 to 34 years of age. This supplement includes the following items: current grade attending at public or private school, whether attending college full- or part-time at a two- or four-year institution, year last attended a regular school, and year graduated from high school.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey, October 1972: School Enrollment
United States. Bureau of the Census, 1991
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. CURRENT POPULATION SURVEY, OCTOBER 1972: SCHOOL ENROLLMENT [Computer file]. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census [producer], 1983. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1991. doi:10.3886/ICPSR09542

Data on labor force activity for the week prior to the survey are supplied in this collection. Information is available on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons 14 years old and over. Demographic variables such as age, sex, race, marital status, veteran status, household relationship, educational background, and national origin or descent are included. In addition to providing these core data, the October survey also contains a special supplement on school enrollment for all persons 3 years old and over. This supplement includes the following items: current grade attending at public or private school, whether attending college full- or part-time at a two- or four-year institution, year last attended a regular school, and year graduated from high school.

Data Sets


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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