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Current Filters: Author:Grobe, Deana [remove]; Publisher:Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [remove];

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Child Care Market Rate Survey Practices and Policies of States, Territories and Tribes, 2005-2006
Grobe, Deana, 2008
Groebe, Deana, Clara C. Pratt, and Roberta B. Weber. Child Care Market Rate Survey Practices and Policies of States, Territories, and Tribes, 2005-2006 [Computer file]. ICPSR21402-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research/Ann Arbor, MI: [distributors].

The primary objective of this study was to describe current market rate survey methods, practices, and policies in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, five territories, and the 28 tribes that conduct their own market rate survey. A market rate survey is a tool to collect up-to-date information on what facilities, within given geographic areas, charge parents for various types of child care. A second objective was to identify the validity issues that emerge from this comparison of current market rate survey practices. Variables are organized under six specific functions representing the market rate survey process. These were: (1) administration/organization of the market rate survey, (2) facility population and sample, (3) data collection, (4) data analysis, (5) dissemination of the results and (6) rate setting policy.

Data Sets


Child Care Market Rate Survey Project: Mail Survey of Oregon Facilities, 2006
Grobe, Deana, 2009
Grobe, Deana. Child Care Market Rate Survey Project: Mail Survey of Oregon Facilities, 2006 [Computer file]. ICPSR23260-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2009-03-05. doi:10.3886/ICPSR23260

This survey was one strategy used to collect child care market price data. Comparing findings garnered from different methods allows one to evaluate whether different data collection methods produce different price findings (convergent validity) and how well these data collection methods represent the child care market (criterion-related validity). These data can also be used to explore several validity issues of concern with market price studies. The major areas of investigation in this survey include child care prices by type of care, geographic location, and price mode (hourly, daily, weekly, monthly). Other areas of investigation include capacity by age group, additional fees facilities charge, whether they care for subsidized children, and what affects the prices that they charge parents.

Data Sets


Child Care Market Rate Survey Project: Oregon Resource and Referral Administrative Data Update, 2006
Grobe, Deana, 2009
Grobe, Deana, Clara C. Pratt, and Roberta B. Weber. Child Care Market Rate Survey Project: Oregon Resource and Referral Administrative Data Update, 2006 [Computer file]. ICPSR23261-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2009-04-22.

This survey was one strategy used to collect child care market price data. Comparing findings garnered from different methods allows one to evaluate whether different data collection methods produce different price findings (convergent validity) and how well these data collection methods represent the child care market (criterion-related validity). These data can also be used to explore several validity issues of concern with market price studies. The major areas of investigation in this survey include child care prices by type of care, geographic location, and price mode (hourly, daily, weekly, monthly). Other areas of investigation include capacity by age group, additional fees facilities charge, whether they care for subsidized children, and what affects the prices that they charge parents.

Data Sets


Child Care Market Rate Survey Project: Telephone Survey of Oregon Facilities, 2006
Grobe, Deana, 2009
Grobe, Deana. Child Care Market Rate Survey Project: Telephone Survey of Oregon Facilities, 2006 [Computer file]. ICPSR23262-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2009-04-22

This survey was one strategy used to collect child care market price data. Comparing findings garnered from different methods allows one to evaluate whether different data collection methods produce different price findings (convergent validity) and how well these data collection methods represent the child care market (criterion-related validity). These data can also be used to explore several validity issues of concern with market price studies. The major areas of investigation in this survey include child care prices by type of care, geographic location, and price mode (hourly, daily, weekly, monthly). Other areas of investigation include capacity by age group, additional fees facilities charge, whether they care for subsidized children, and what affects the prices that they charge parents.

Data Sets


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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