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Acute care and antibiotic seeking for upper respiratory tract infections for children in day care: Parental knowledge and day care center policies
Friedman, Jennifer F., April 2003
Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 157(4), 369-374

A study of predictors of the parental seeking of acute care and antibiotics for children with upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) who attend child care, based on surveys of 211 parents and staff from 36 child care centers

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Adult outcomes as a function of an early childhood educational program: An Abecedarian Project follow-up
Campbell, Frances A., July, 2012
Developmental Psychology, 48(4), 1033-1043

A longitudinal study of the effect of an early educational intervention on economic, socioemotional, and educational outcomes at age 30, based on data collected from 101 of the original low-income participants in the Abecedarian Project experiment in North Carolina

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Building infrastructure to support home visiting to prevent child maltreatment: Two-year findings from the cross-site evaluation of the supporting evidence-based home visiting initiative
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 12 August, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

The Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting to Prevent Child Maltreatment (EBHV) initiative is designed to build knowledge about how to build the infrastructure and service delivery systems necessary to implement, scale-up, and sustain evidence-based home visiting program models as a strategy to prevent child maltreatment. The grantee cluster, funded by the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, includes 17 diverse grantees from 15 states. Each grantee selected one or more home visiting models it planned to implement for the first time in its state or community (new implementers) or to enhance, adapt for new target populations, or expand. To support the implementation of home visiting with fidelity to their evidence-based models and help ensure their long-term sustainability, the grantees are developing infrastructure such as identifying funding streams and establishing strategies for developing and supporting the home visiting workforce. The EBHV grantees must conduct local evaluations to assess implementation, outcomes, and costs associated with their selected home visiting models. The national cross-site evaluation, conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and its partner, Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, is designed to identify successful strategies for building infrastructure to implement or support the grantee-selected home visiting models (Koball et al. 2009). This report describes cross-site findings from the first two years of the initiative (fiscal years 2008-2010), including the planning period and early implementation of the grantee-selected home visiting models. The report primarily addresses four questions: 1. What was the state or local context with respect to home visiting as EBHV grantees planned and implemented their projects? 2. What partnerships did grantees form to support planning and early implementation of new home visiting programs? 3. What infrastructure was needed to implement home visiting program models in the early stages of the EBHV grant? 4. How did EBHV grantees and their associated home visiting implementing agencies (IAs) prepare for and implement new home visiting programs? (author abstract)

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Building infrastructure to support home visiting to prevent child maltreatment: Two-year findings from the cross-site evaluation of the supporting evidence-based home visiting initiative [Executive summary]
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 12 April, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

The Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting to Prevent Child Maltreatment (EBHV) initiative is designed to build knowledge about how to build the infrastructure and service delivery systems necessary to implement, scale-up, and sustain evidence-based home visiting program models as a strategy to prevent child maltreatment. The grantee cluster, funded by the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, includes 17 diverse grantees from 15 states. Each grantee selected one or more home visiting models it planned to implement for the first time in its state or community (new implementers) or to enhance, adapt for new target populations, or expand. To support the implementation of home visiting with fidelity to their evidence-based models and help ensure their long-term sustainability, the grantees are developing infrastructure such as identifying funding streams and establishing strategies for developing and supporting the home visiting workforce. The EBHV grantees must conduct local evaluations to assess implementation, outcomes, and costs associated with their selected home visiting models. The national cross-site evaluation, conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and its partner, Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, is designed to identify successful strategies for building infrastructure to implement or support the grantee-selected home visiting models (Koball et al. 2009). This report describes cross-site findings from the first two years of the initiative (fiscal years 2008-2010), including the planning period and early implementation of the grantee-selected home visiting models. The report primarily addresses four questions: 1. What was the state or local context with respect to home visiting as EBHV grantees planned and implemented their projects? 2. What partnerships did grantees form to support planning and early implementation of new home visiting programs? 3. What infrastructure was needed to implement home visiting program models in the early stages of the EBHV grant? 4. How did EBHV grantees and their associated home visiting implementing agencies (IAs) prepare for and implement new home visiting programs? (author abstract)

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Child care effects on the development of toddlers with special needs
Booth-LaForce, Cathryn L., 2002
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 17(2), 171-196

A study comparing the development of toddlers with special needs in nonmaternal child care with those cared for at home by mothers

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Child developmental impact of Pittsburgh's Early Childhood Initiative (ECI) in high-risk communities: First-phase authentic evaluation research
Bagnato, Stephen J., 2002
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 17(4), 559-580

An inquiry into the correlation between participation in an early childhood program and children’s outcomes, based on an assessment of 155 high-risk youth who participated in the Early Childhood Initiative (ECI) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

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The complex interplay between biology and environment: Otitis media and mediating effects on early literacy development
Roberts, Joanne E., 2001
In S. B. Neuman & D. K. Dickinson (Eds.), Handbook of early literacy research (Vol. 1, pp. 232-241). New York: Guilford Press

An examination of the influence of Otitis media with effusion (OME) on children’s early language and literacy skills, and of the interactive or independent influence of a children’s home and child care environments on early language and literacy acquisition

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Early language and the development of children's reading skills
Poe, Michele, 2004
Journal of School Psychology, 42(4), 315-335

A longitudinal study of African American children's language and reading development to examine the relations among phonological awareness, language skills, print processing skills, and reading development in prekindergarten and in second grade

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Home support for emergent literacy: Follow-up of a community-based implementation of dialogic reading
Huebner, Coleen E., May-June 2010
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 31(3), 195-260

A longitudinal study of the effects of dialogic reading training on the shared reading behaviors of 78 parents of 4-year-old children as measured at an average of 33 months following the training

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Mothers of young children with disabilities: Perceived benefits and worries about preschool
Mawdsley, Helena P., September, 2013
Early Child Development and Care, 183(9), 1258-1275

A child's move from early intervention (EI) to special education preschool is considered to be a critical transition point for both the child and family. Family concerns during this process are heightened by changes in service delivery systems. Although much has been written about the transition from EI services, little is known about the parents' perceptions of the early preschool experience. Data from a sample of 105 mothers and their children from the Early Intervention Collaborative Study [Hauser-Cram, P., Warfield, M.E., Shonkoff, J.P., & Krauss, M.W. (2001). Children with disabilities: A longitudinal study of child development and parent well-being. Society for Research in Child Development Monographs, 66, 1-131] were used to analyse mothers' reports on a study-developed measure designed to capture their views of children's preschool experiences immediately following transition. Factor analysis indicated two distinct factors, 'benefits of school' and 'worries about school.' Each of these factors was then regressed on child, family, and preschool classroom characteristics to examine predictors of maternal perceptions about her child's new preschool experience. Implications for the receiving special education programmes and preschool teachers' practices are discussed. (author abstract)

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Opportunities for health promotion education in child care
Gupta, Ruchi S., 2005
Pediatrics, 116(4), 499-505

A study exploring the attitudes toward, barriers to, and strategies for incorporating health promotion activities in child care settings, using surveys of directors, health consultants, and parents from licensed child care centers in Boston

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Oral health activities of Early Head Start teachers directed toward children and parents
Kranz, Ashley M., Spring 2011
Journal of Public Health Dentistry, 71(2), 161-169

A survey of teacher knowledge, values, classroom activities, and parent communication related to children's oral and dental health in the Early Head Start programs of North Carolina

Reports & Papers


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Physical activity and beverages in home- and center-based child care programs
Tandon, Pooja S., July/August 2012
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 44(4), 355-359

A comparison of physical activity, space, and beverage provision related to obesity prevention among a group of home- and center-based child care programs and in comparison to select elements of the Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care (NAP SACC) best-practice guidelines, based on data from 168 licensed home- and center-based child care programs in Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Washington surveyed between October and December 2008

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Preschoolers' total daily screen time at home and by type of child care
Tandon, Pooja S., February 2011
Journal of Pediatrics, 158(2), 297-300

An assessment of preschoolers' cumulative daily screen time, both at home and at child care, based on a secondary analysis of data from a sample of 8,950 that represents approximately 4 million preschool children

Reports & Papers


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The role of home literacy practices in preschool children's language and emergent literacy skills
Roberts, Joanne E., 2005
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 48(2), 345-359

An examination of the impact of home literacy activities (frequency of shared book reading, maternal book reading strategies, child's enjoyment of reading, maternal sensitivity) on low income, African American preschool children's language and emergent literacy skills

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Social risk and protective child, parenting, and child care factors in early elementary school years
Burchinal, Margaret, 2006
Parenting: Science and Practice, 6(1), 79-113

A longitudinal study of African American children followed from birth to third grade to investigate the effects of protective factors, including quality of home and child care environments, on their academic achievements, social competencies, and school readiness

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Who cares?
Healthy Child Care South Carolina,
Columbia: Healthy Child Care South Carolina.

An overview of policies to address the availability, affordability, and quality of child care in South Carolina

Fact Sheets & Briefs


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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