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Current Filters: Pub Year:2001 [remove];

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Assessing costs and benefits of early childhood intervention programs: Overview and application to the Starting Early Starting Smart program: Executive summary
Karoly, Lynn A., 2001
Seattle: Casey Family Programs; Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation.

A report summarizing the methodological issues in developing a cost benefit analysis for early childhood programs and their implications for the Starting Early Starting Smart intervention.

Executive Summary


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The effect of child care costs on the labor force participation and welfare recipiency of single mothers: Implications for welfare reform
Connelly, Rachel, March 2001
(WP01-69). Kalamazoo, MI: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

A study of the effects of child care costs on single mothers' labor force participation and welfare recipiency decisions, based on data from the nationally representative Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) 1992 and 1993 Panels

Reports & Papers


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The Starting Early Starting Smart story
United States. Department of Health and Human Services, 2001
Washington, DC: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

A description of the Starting Early Starting Smart (SESS) research initiative, designed to integrate behavioral health services with child care and primary health care services for children from birth to 7 years of age

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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