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1.

2012 report: Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Supplement to the National Agricultural Worker Survey
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, March, 2012
(OPRE Report No. 2012-13). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

Findings on the characteristics of families with children under 6 years old from the National Agricultural Worker Survey (NAWS), a national random sample survey of crop farmworkers, and findings on families' child care experiences from the NAWS Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Supplement, which is administered to NAWS respondents with children under the age of 6

Reports & Papers

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2.

Access to Early Care and Education (ECE) for Disadvantaged Families
Madill, Rebecca, 2015
Child Trends

The purpose of the present study is to understand the role that state-level child care subsidy policies play in predicting disadvantaged families' access to high-quality early care and education (ECE). The federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) has dual goals of supporting parental employment and providing high-quality ECE to children. States set many of their own policies for administering child care subsidies to disadvantaged families, but it is unclear how different subsidy policies are related to access to ECE in different populations--especially ethnic minorities and families with limited English proficiency. This study has three objectives: 1. Provide descriptive information comparing the ECE experiences of subsidy-eligible and ineligible children 2. Determine whether certain combinations of subsidies (i.e., subsidy profiles) are associated with whether economically-disadvantaged children receive subsidies. 3. Determine how subsidy policy profiles are associated with economically-disadvantaged families' access to ECE.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects

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3.

Addressing challenging behaviors in Head Start: A closer look at program policies and procedures
Quesenberry, Amanda C., February, 2011
Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 30(4), 209-220

An examination of Head Start policies and procedures related to child guidance and challenging behaviors, based on interviews with program staff and document analysis from 6 Head Start programs in the Midwest

Reports & Papers

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4.

Addressing mental health, behavioral health, and social and emotional well-being in Head Start: Insights from the Head Start Health Manager Descriptive Study
Karoly, Lynn A., October, 2016
(OPRE Report 2016-90). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

In this brief, our primary goal is to place a spotlight on mental health, behavioral health, and social and emotional well-being in Head Start and Early Head Start (HS/EHS), drawing on data from the Head Start Health Manager Descriptive Study (HSHMDS) (see text box) to identify the nature of the health issues programs face, the approach to staffing and the types of supports and services provided, and the community partners that programs work with to address this important aspect of early childhood health. In particular, we focus on the following questions: - What mental health, behavioral health, and social and emotional well-being issues do HS/EHS programs face? - What staffing models are used to address this domain of health? How does staff training address mental health, behavioral health, and social and emotional well-being? - What health programming (e.g., services, activities, education) is in place to address mental health, behavioral health, and social and emotional well-being issues? - How are programs leveraging the Health Services Advisory Committee (HSAC), health care providers, and other community resources to address mental health, behavioral health, and social and emotional well-being? While we rely primarily on findings from the Health Manager Survey, we also integrate some of the qualitative findings based on the interviews with health managers and other program staff. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

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5.

Addressing oral health in Head Start: Insights from the Head Start Health Manager Descriptive Study
Martin, Laurie T., October, 2016
(OPRE Report 2016-84). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

As reported by health managers in the Head Start Health Manager Descriptive Study (HSHMDS) (see textbox for more information), one of the major health issues confronting HS/EHS programs is tooth decay. Thus, in this brief, our primary objective is to draw on the quantitative and qualitative data collected for the HSHMDS to obtain insights into the ways in which HS/EHS programs are addressing the issues of tooth decay for the children and families they serve. In particular, we focus on the following questions: - What is the perceived burden of tooth decay on HS/EHS programs? - What health programming (e.g., services, activities, education) and policies are currently in place to address tooth decay? - What staffing models are used to address need? How is staff training addressing tooth decay? - How are programs leveraging other partners, community resources and the Health Services Advisory Committee (HSAC) to address tooth decay? (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

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6.

Addressing overweight and obesity in Head Start: Insights from the Head Start Health Manager Descriptive Study
Martin, Laurie T., October, 2016
(OPRE Report 2016-85). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

As reported by health managers in the Head Start Health Manager Descriptive Study (HSHMDS) (see textbox for more information), one of the major health issues confronting Head Start (HS) and Early Head Start (EHS) programs is overweight and obesity both for the children they serve, as well as the children's adult family members. Thus, in this brief, our primary objective is to draw on the quantitative and qualitative data collected for the HSHMDS to obtain insights into the ways in which HS/EHS programs are addressing the issues of overweight and obesity for the children and families they serve. In particular, we focus on the following questions: - What is the perceived burden of overweight and obesity on HS/EHS programs? - What health programming (e.g., services, activities, education) and policies are currently in place to address overweight and obesity? - What staffing models are used to address need? How is staff training addressing overweight and obesity? - How are programs leveraging other partners, community resources and the Health Services Advisory Committee (HSAC) to address overweight and obesity? (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

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7.

Adjustment Scales for Preschool Intervention: Extending validity and relevance across multiple perspectives
Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca J., 2004
Psychology in the Schools, 41(7), 725-736

Two studies evaluating the behavioral and emotional difficulties of Head Start preschool children, and assessing the reliability and concurrent validity of the Adjustment Scales for Preschool Intervention (ASPI)

Reports & Papers

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8.

Administrative data as children's well-being indicators: The South Carolina Data Bridge Project
Lavenda, Osnat, July, 2011
Child Indicators Research, 4(3), 439-451

Administrative data are data regularly collected by organizations for monitoring and documentation purposes. They usually represent entire populations; they are timely; and have direct influence on their sources which are mostly governmental agencies. We argue in this paper that administrative data can and should be used as indicators of children's well-being as they constitute an existing body of knowledge that has the potential to form and influence policy. Such use of administrative data as of child well-being indicators is demonstrated by the South Carolina Data Bridge Project, initiated with a child care research capacity grant awarded in 2007 by the Office of Planning, Research and Families (OPRE) to study the impact of Child Care and Development Fund on the quality of care available to and utilized by low-income working parents and at-risk families. The project's goal was achieved by linking different sources of child care administrative data to create analytic data cubes that allow the examination of quality of care provided to children and factors contributing to it. This project indicates the importance of administrative data and their potential impact on well-informed decision making and policy change to improve children and families' well-being. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

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9.

Aligning stage-appropriate evaluation with the stages of implementation: Formative evaluation and fidelity
Blasberg, Amy, 2013
In T. Halle, A. Metz, & I. Martinez-Beck (Eds.), Applying implementation science in early childhood programs and systems (pp. 95-96). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

An introduction to a section of the book Applying Implementation Science in Early Childhood Programs and Systems, focusing on the application of implementation science concepts to the early stages of early care and education program implementation

Other

10.

Aligning stage-appropriate evaluation with the stages of implementation: Ongoing monitoring and scale-up/replication
Blasberg, Amy, 2013
In T. Halle, A. Metz, & I. Martinez-Beck (Eds.), Applying implementation science in early childhood programs and systems (pp. 171-172). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

An introduction to a section of the book Applying Implementation Science in Early Childhood Programs and Systems, focusing on the application of implementation science concepts to the later stages of early care and education program implementation

Other

11.

American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (AI/AN FACES)
United States. Administration for Children and Families,
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families.

Nationally, about 35,575 American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children and their families are served by Head Start. Just over half of these children and families are served by 150 AI/AN Head Start programs in Region XI. While we have a wealth of information about Head Start children and families in general, we have little information about those who attend Head Start programs in Region XI, which includes both Native and non-Native children. A major source of descriptive information on Head Start-the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES)-has not historically included Region XI programs, children and families. As a result, we have little data to assess the service needs of the children and families in Region XI and to help inform policies and practices for addressing these needs. The American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (AI/AN FACES) is designed to fill this information gap with tribal voices at the forefront. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

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12.

The American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey: Study progress and selected findings from the first national study of Tribal Head Start programs
Godfrey, Angie, September, 2016
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation

This webinar provides a brief overview of the American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (AI/AN FACES), including study planning, design, and features. Initial findings based on child assessments, parent surveys, and teacher reports are presented from the Fall 2015 data collection, representative of Region XI Head Start programs run by tribal communities.

Multimedia

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13.

The American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey: Study progress and selected findings from the first national study of Tribal Head Start programs [PowerPoint]
Godfrey, Angie, September, 2016
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation

This PowerPoint presentation accompanies a webinar that provides a brief overview of the American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (AI/AN FACES), including study planning, design, and features. Initial findings based on child assessments, parent surveys, and teacher reports are presented from the Fall 2015 data collection, representative of Region XI Head Start programs run by tribal communities.

Other

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14.

Appendix
Burchinal, Margaret, June, 2016
Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 81(2), 95-98

This appendix provides two tables of information related to a study of the relationship between children's development and quality levels, quality features, and the extent of children's exposure to early care and education, based on secondary data analyses of eight large-scale studies of preschool children. The tables consist of child and family characteristics for matched and unmatched child samples in the Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES 2006 and 2009) and the Head Start Impact Study (HSIS).

Other

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15.

Appendix 4: A guide to understanding state child care subsidy programs through analysis of public and non-public use datasets
Zanoni, Wladimir, August, 2009
New York: Child Care & Early Education Research Connections

A guide to using survey data from the Census Bureau and administrative data generated by state child care subsidy and other programs to study child care subsidy take-up rates and the relationship between parental employment and child care subsidy receipt

Other

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16.

Appendix C: Effect size outcomes by intervention and developmental groups
Murray, Desiree W., February, 2016
(OPRE Report #2016-34). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

This Appendix summarizes the available evidence from our literature review for interventions that build self-regulation across development. This information is provided as a reference for the report entitled Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress: A Systematic Review of Self-Regulation Interventions, and should not be interpreted independently. The purpose of this Appendix is to present specific findings upon which this report's conclusions were based. (author abstract)

Other

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17.

Applications of implementation science to early care and education programs and systems: Implications for research, policy, and practice
Halle, Tamara, 2013
In T. Halle, A. Metz, & I. Martinez-Beck (Eds.), Applying implementation science in early childhood programs and systems (pp. 295-314). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

A discussion of the research, policy, and practice implications from a collection of writings on the role of implementation science in early care and education, with examples of applications of implementation science principles, strategies, and frameworks to early care and education practices, programs, and systems

Other

18.

Applying implementation science in early childhood programs and systems
Halle, Tamara, 2013
Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

A collection of writings on the role of implementation science in early care and education, with examples of applications of implementation science principles, strategies, and frameworks to early care and education practices, programs, and systems

Other

19.

Applying lessons learned from evaluations of model early care and education programs to preparation for effective implementation at scale
Downer, Jason T., 2013
In T. Halle, A. Metz, & I. Martinez-Beck (Eds.), Applying implementation science in early childhood programs and systems (pp. 157-169). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

A discussion of the roles of coaching and intervention fidelity data in supporting successful program implementation

Other

20.

Approaches to assessing the language and literacy skills of young dual language learners: A review of the research
Aikens, Nikki, 2012
(Research Brief No. 10). Chapel Hill, NC: Center for Early Care and Education Research: Dual Language Learners.

A summary of a review of the procedures used to assess the language and literacy development of young dual language learners, based on 80 studies from Canada and the United States

Fact Sheets & Briefs

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21.

Approaches to measuring Early Head Start-child care partnerships: Recommendations and considerations
Paulsell, Diane, September, 2015
(OPRE Report No.2015-62). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

The Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), awarded a contract to Mathematica Policy Research and its partners to carry out the Study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships. ACF's goal for the study is to understand whether these partnerships provide continuity of care; meet families' needs for child care; and improve outcomes for providers, families, and children. As part of the project, we developed a theory of change that includes four sets of constructs: (1) inputs to the partnerships, (2) partnership activities, (3) short- and long-term outcomes, and (4) organizational and contextual factors that influence the partnerships. The purpose of this report is to provide a roadmap for measuring all aspects of the partnerships included in the theory of change. We developed the report with a broad range of stakeholders in mind, including researchers, administrators, and practitioners. The recommended measurement approaches will also inform the evaluation design and data collection plan for the Study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships. For each element in the model, we describe the constructs, data elements, data collection methods, and recommended measures, as well as the types of questions that can be answered and how the proposed data collection can inform policy, practice, and research. We conclude with a description of our approach to developing and pre-testing new measures and qualitative data collection protocols. (author abstract)

Other

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22.

Approaches to measuring Early Head Start-child care partnerships: Recommendations and considerations [Executive summary]
Paulsell, Diane, September, 2015
(OPRE Report 2015-62). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

The Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), awarded a contract to Mathematica Policy Research and its partners to carry out the Study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships. ACF's goal for the study is to understand whether these partnerships provide continuity of care; meet families' needs for child care; and improve outcomes for providers, families, and children. As part of the project, we developed a theory of change that includes four sets of constructs: (1) inputs to the partnerships, (2) partnership activities, (3) short- and long-term outcomes, and (4) organizational and contextual factors that influence the partnerships. The purpose of this report is to provide a roadmap for measuring all aspects of the partnerships included in the theory of change. We developed the report with a broad range of stakeholders in mind, including researchers, administrators, and practitioners. The recommended measurement approaches will also inform the evaluation design and data collection plan for the Study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships. For each element in the model, we describe the constructs, data elements, data collection methods, and recommended measures, as well as the types of questions that can be answered and how the proposed data collection can inform policy, practice, and research. We conclude with a description of our approach to developing and pre-testing new measures and qualitative data collection protocols. (author abstract)

Executive Summary

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23.

Are Child Care Subsidies Cost-Effective?
Herbst, Chris M., 2005
University of Maryland

A study of the cost-effectiveness of child care subsidies along two dimensions: (1) a comparison of measures of cost-effectiveness to the alternative of an Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); and (2) clarification of an optimal design strategy through the exploitation of the substantial cross-state policy innovation. The issue addressed is the extent to which these policies increase incentives for labor supply and human capital development, while reducing poverty and receipt of cash assistance. The study employs an empirical approach involving three broad steps: (1) modeling labor supply as a function of key budget constraint variables, including child care costs and the EITC, using a sample of single women; (2) modeling a number of indicators of educational attainment, in-school status, and job training enrollment as a function of child care costs and the EITC; and (3) conducting a welfare analysis on various components of states' CCDF comparisons in order to clarify an optimal design strategy. Data is drawn from multiple sources, primarily the Current Population Survey (CPS) and the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP).

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects

24.

Are Higher Subsidy Payment Rates and Provider-Friendly Payment Policies Associated with Child Care Quality?
Derrick-Mills, Teresa, 2015
Urban Institute

The goal of this project is to provide policy makers and the research community with useful information on whether subsidy payment rates and the adoption of various payment practices and policies is associated with the quality of child care centers and homes attended by children receiving child care subsidies. Literature to date has primarily examined whether child care subsidies are associated with child care quality and stability, but little is known about the extent to which payment policies and practices, which vary across states, can mediate the relationship between subsidy receipt and quality of care. This study combines data on payment rates and practices, drawn largely from the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Policies Database, with a variety of quality indicators available in the 2012 National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE).

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects

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25.

Assessing the evidence of effectiveness of home visiting program models implemented in tribal communities
Del Grosso, Patricia, August, 2011
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

This report describes the findings from the review of home visiting programs implemented in tribal communities or evaluated with American Indian or Alaska Native families and children. The original review was conducted in fall 2010 and the report was released in February 2011. This report was updated in August 2011 based on additional studies identified through an updated literature search conducted in spring 2011. (author abstract)

Literature Review

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26.

Assessing the evidence of effectiveness of home visiting program models implemented in tribal communities
Del Grosso, Patricia, September, 2013
(OPRE Report No. 2013-41). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

This report describes the findings from the review of home visiting programs implemented in tribal communities or evaluated with American Indian or Alaska Native families and children. The original review was conducted in fall 2010 and the report was released in February 2011. This report is updated annually, most recently in August 2013 based on studies identified through an updated literature search conducted in early 2013 to identify new studies released during 2012, as well as to incorporate studies identified by the HomVEE team as including an AIAN population that were not previously included in the report. (author abstract)

Literature Review

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27.

Assessing the Implementation and Cost of High Quality Early Care and Education (ECE-ICHQ)
Kirby, Gretchen, 2014
Mathematica Policy Research

Growing evidence about the benefits of high quality care for young children, particularly low-income children, has garnered a strong commitment at both the federal and state levels to improve the quality of early care and education (ECE) programs. Yet, in an environment of competing demands and limited resources, policymakers, administrators, and other key stakeholders lack the information needed to effectively target funds to increase quality in ECE. The existing research base about the association between the costs and quality of ECE is not sufficient to inform these decisions. The Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), has launched the Assessing the Implementation and Cost of High-Quality ECE (ECE-ICHQ) project. The goal of the project is to create a technically sound, feasible, and useful instrument that will provide consistent and systematic measures of the implementation and costs of quality to help fill the knowledge gap about the cost of providing and improving quality in ECE. The unique contribution of the project is its focus on documenting implementation by using an implementation science lens (parsing out context and implementation inputs and activities) to identify the cost ingredients of quality and to measure differences in implementation and context that may matter to costs.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects

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28.

Assessing the implementation and cost of high quality early care and education: A review of the literature
Caronongan, Pia, April, 2016
(OPRE Report 2016-31). Washington DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

This report summarizes the findings of a literature review conducted as part of the Assessing the Implementation and Cost of High-Quality ECE (ECE-ICHQ) project funded by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation within the Administration for Children and Families at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The project's goal is to create a technically sound and feasible instrument that will provide consistent, systematic measures of the implementation and costs of education and care in center-based settings that serve children from birth to age 5. The ultimate measures will inform research, policy, and practice by improving understanding of variations in what centers do to support quality, their associated costs, and how resources for ECE may be better aligned with expectations for quality. We reviewed the literature and research syntheses in three areas--ECE quality, implementation science, and ECE costs--to create a conceptual framework that will guide measurement development. (author abstract)

Literature Review

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29.

Assessing the implementation and cost of high quality early care and education: A review of the literature [Executive summary]
Caronongan, Pia, April, 2016
(OPRE Report 2016-31). Washington DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

Measures of implementation and cost of ECE are needed for use and testing together with measures of quality to shed light on what it takes--in terms of activities, capacities, and money--to achieve high quality within a center. Implementation measures need to reflect what ECE centers are doing to educate and care for children and how they are doing it. Cost measures need to capture the way ECE centers allocate the resources they have to work with. The Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) launched a new project--Assessing the Implementation and Cost of High-Quality ECE (ECE-ICHQ)--to develop measures of implementation and cost for an ECE center. The measures will inform research, policy, and practice by improving understanding of variations in what centers do to support quality, their associated costs, and how resources for ECE may be better aligned with expectations for quality. The project's goal is to create a technically sound, feasible, and useful instrument that will provide consistent, systematic measures of the implementation and costs of education and care in center-based settings that serve children from birth to age 5 ("ECE centers"). By "costs" we mean how much it costs to operate a center, including costs incurred by the center, as well as the value of in-kind contributions such as space or labor. (author abstract)

Executive Summary

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30.

Assessing initiatives for family, friend, and neighbor child care: An overview of models and evaluations
Porter, Toni, March, 2007
(Research-to-Policy Connections No. 5). New York: Child Care & Early Education Research Connections

A description of current efforts to support and enhance home-based, regulation-exempt child care provided by family, friends, and/or neighbors, and of the documentation and evaluation of these efforts

Fact Sheets & Briefs

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31.

Assessing quality in family and provider/teacher relationships: Using the Family and Provider/Teacher Relationship Quality (FPTRQ) measures in conjunction with Strengthening Families (TM) and the Head Start Parent, Family and Community engagement frameworks and self-assessment tools: A research-to-practice brief
Porter, Toni, April, 2015
(OPRE Report 2015-56). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

This research-to-practice brief is intended to help policymakers, program managers, and practitioners learn how the newly released Family and Provider/Teacher Relationship Quality(FPTRQ) measures can be used to complement or supplement two approaches, Strengthening Families (TM) and the Head Start Parent, Family and Community Engagement (PFCE) frameworks, and their related self-assessments, that have been frequently used by Early Care and Education (ECE) stakeholders to support their work with families and to assess their programs, providers and teachers in these efforts. It is based on a systematic review of the Strengthening Families (TM) and the Head Start PFCE frameworks and self-assessment tools, and their alignment with the FPTRQ conceptual model and measures. (author abstract)

Other

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32.

Assessing States' Child Care Quality Rating Systems (QRS)
Kirby, Gretchen, 2008
Mathematica Policy Research

Statewide or local child care Quality Rating Systems (QRS) are in place in 26 states and are under consideration in many others as tools to measure, monitor, and promote quality in early child care and education programs. The QRS Assessment produced a series of products as a resource to inform decision-making about and evaluation of QRS. Key products include: (1) a compendium of QRS, (2) two in-depth study reports (one focused on quality measurement and one on the role of QRIS in integration of the early care and education system); (3) a secondary data analysis on quality measurement, and (4) a toolkit for evaluating QRIS. Research questions include: (1) What is the variation in how select QRIS define and measure quality?; (2) What processes are used to measure components and determine an overall rating?; (2) What is the availability (and use) of consistent and reliable data on quality measurement?; (4) What role does QRIS have and to what extent does it contribute to integration of early care and education programs?; (5) How could states and localities monitor and assess the extent to which QRIS contribute to ECE system development?; (6) What is the prevalence of quality rating components across QRIS and at different levels?; (7) How does the prevalence of quality rating components differ between rating levels across QRIS and between types of providers (such as Head Start and accredited centers)?; (8) What is the unique effect of each quality component on observed quality?; and (9) What patterns of quality profiles emerge based on unique effects of components and how do these profiles map to actual rating levels in QRIS?

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects

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33.

Assessment tools for language and literacy development of young dual language learners (DLLs)
Atkins-Burnett, Sally, 2012
(Research Brief No. 9). Chapel Hill, NC: Center for Early Care and Education Research: Dual Language Learners.

A summary of a review of the reliability and validity of measures used to assess the language and literacy development of young dual language learners, based on 7 large-scale government studies and 30 research studies from Canada and the United States

Fact Sheets & Briefs

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34.

The association between early care arrangements, quality, and emergent bilingual Latino American children's math and literacy skills in English
Bumgarner, Erin, Q1 2015
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 30(1), 32-44

Drawing on a sample of Latino American children from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth cohort (ECLS-B), this paper uses propensity score matching to examine the relation between care arrangements the year before kindergarten and math and literacy outcomes, in English, at kindergarten entry. Care arrangements included: Head Start (federally-funded center-based care for young children from low-income families), pre-kindergarten (state-funded center-based care), other-center care, parental care, and other-home care (care provided in a home, by relatives other than a parent or non-relatives). For literacy, results revealed that (1) Latino children in center-based care (Head Start, pre-kindergarten, and other-center) scored higher than Latino children in other-home care and (2) Latino children in Head Start (but not pre-kindergarten or other-center) scored higher than Latino children in parental care. For math, Latino children in other-center care outperformed Latino children in other-home care and Head Start. No significant differences emerged among Head Start, pre-kindergarten, or other-center for math or literacy outcomes. Follow-up analyses indicate that quality of care helps to explain the significant differences. Policy implications are discussed. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

35.

Associations between provider training and education and other quality indicators in low-income children's primary care arrangements at 24 months of age
Halle, Tamara, June, 2009
(Publication No. 2009-18, OPRE Research Brief No. 2). Washington, DC: United States. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A comparison of quality indicators in home- and center-based child care settings serving two-year-old low income children, and of the relationship of quality indicators in those settings to provider training and education, based on an analysis of data from the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort

Reports & Papers

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36.

Associations between provider training and education and other quality indicators in low-income children's primary care arrangements at 24 months of age [Executive summary]
Halle, Tamara, May 2009
(Publication No. 2009-18, OPRE Research Brief No. 2). Washington, DC: United States. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation

A summary of a comparison of quality indicators in home- and center-based child care settings serving two-year-old low income children, and of the relationship of quality indicators in those settings to provider training and education, based on an analysis of data from the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort

Executive Summary

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37.

Attendance rates and child outcomes
Ferguson, Daniel, September, 2014
New York: Child Care & Early Education Research Connections

Each September marks Attendance Awareness Month, which recognizes the important role attendance plays in supporting children's development, learning, and academic achievement. Research has examined this role extensively for attendance during children's K-12 school years. For children's early years there is a wide range of research exploring topics related to the time they spend enrolled in programs, including in full- versus part-day programs, their age at enrollment, and the number of years of program enrollment. However, there is less research asking: once children are enrolled in a given program, how often do they attend and how does attendance relate to their developmental and school outcomes? This Topic of Interest highlights research that addresses those questions. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs

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38.

Authentic assessment in infant & toddler care settings: Review of recent research
Zollitsch, Brenda, June 2010
Portland, ME: Edmund S. Muskie School of Public Service, Cutler Institute for Health and Social Policy.

A discussion of authentic assessment as an approach to the collection of information about infant and toddler functioning and to the design of developmentally appropriate infant and toddler curricula

Fact Sheets & Briefs

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39.

AVANCE-Houston's partnership with the Houston Independent School District
Abrams, Jennifer, September, 2016
(Case Study #5, Publication # 2016-26). Bethesda, MD: Child Trends.

AVANCE-Houston offers Early Head Start, Head Start, and other family services. This case study describes their partnership with the Houston Independent School District to follow AVANCE children through the early elementary grades to better understand children's school achievement, which has informed AVANCE-Houston's continuous quality improvement plans. It illustrates some of the key steps needed to link data over time between two organizations. This case study highlights an example of linking data that involves merging two separate datasets into a single data file. (author abstract)

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40.

Awareness, Accessibility, & Adequacy: Child Care Management among Low-Income, Urban Black Custodial Grandmothers
Pittman, LaShawnDa Latrice, 2009
Northwestern University

An analysis of how low-income, urban black custodial grandmothers manage child care, using ethnographic research methods--including in-depth interviews with custodial grandmothers and child care agents over a twelve-month period and participant observation sessions in child care settings--to explore the following questions: (1) What do low-income, urban black custodial grandmothers do for child care when they are thrust into the role of parenting their grandchildren?; (2) What are the strategies they adopt for their grandchildren's care and development while they are serving as their primary and sole caretakers?; (3) How do different strategies affect the way children spend their time?; and (4) What comparisons can be made in the care offered children being cared for by their grandmothers that differ by the type of care arrangement grandmothers have with their grandchildren (e.g. private kinship care, legal guardianship, or kinship foster care) and/or the types of child care services and resources available in their neighborhoods? The goal of this project is to better understand individual family decisions within the context of their family forms and dynamics and the choices available at the state and community level.

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41.

Background literature review pertaining to the Early Head Start study
Raikes, Helen, February, 2013
Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 78(1), 1-19

An overview of the Early Head Start program model and of the relationship of early childhood program participation to children's school readiness outcomes

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42.

Benefits of early care and education for children in the child welfare system
Klein, Sacha Mareka, November, 2016
(A Research-to-Practice Brief, OPRE Report #: 2016-68). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

Young children birth through five years old in the United States are more likely to experience child maltreatment, subsequent child welfare system (CWS) involvement, negative developmental outcomes, and serious maltreatment-related injuries and death than older children. This research-to-practice brief provides a model for how early care and education (ECE) services can benefit this vulnerable age group by exploring emerging evidence from social science research on the effects of ECE on the CWS's goals of: (1) child safety, (2) permanency, and (3) wellbeing. The brief determines that the bulk of existing research indicates that at least some types of ECE services can help the CWS achieve its child safety and well-being goals. However, the vast majority of young children in the CWS are not utilizing ECE services despite these apparent benefits. Additional research is needed to understand the specific pathways through which ECE influences child welfare outcomes, the effects of ECE on the CWS's permanency goal, and which types of ECE arrangements are most beneficial for children in the CWS. The brief concludes by discussing several organizational practices that child welfare administrators can use to build collaborations with local ECE service providers in order to increase the enrollment of CWS-supervised-children in ECE programs. (author abstract)

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43.

Best practices for conducting program observations as part of quality rating and improvement systems
Hamre, Bridget, June, 2011
(Research-to-Policy, Research-to-Practice Brief OPRE 2011-11b). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A discussion of considerations for the use of program observation as part of quality rating and improvement systems, including issues related to measurement selection, planning and conducting observations, and scoring and reporting

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44.

Best practices in creating and adapting quality rating and improvement system (QRIS) rating scales
Burchinal, Margaret, May, 2016
(OPRE Research Brief 2016-25). Washington DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

The brief summarizes an analysis that uses the data from six large studies of early care and education to simulate state QRIS ratings. The results suggest that QRIS ratings can achieve their desired goal of predicting gains in child outcomes when attention is paid to the psychometric principles of scale development including: dimensionality (ensuring that a scale represents one, not multiple dimensions), selecting items with strong evidence, and scoring items using established criteria for cut points. (author abstract)

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45.

Best practices in data governance and management for early care and education: Supporting effective quality rating and improvement systems
Weber, Roberta B. (Bobbie), June, 2014
(OPRE Research Brief No. 2014-35). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

As a centerpiece of state early care and education (ECE) activities, Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) serve as an example of the how an effective ECE data system can support planning, operations, service delivery, monitoring and evaluation. Intentional and rigorous data management practices are essential for data gathered exclusively for the QRIS (such as program observation scores), as well as for external data accessed by the QRIS (such as workforce registry data). Implementing strong ECE data governance and management practices will ensure the quality of QRIS data and thus the integrity of the QRIS itself. Incomplete, inaccurate, or unreliable data can introduce errors in the ratings that can threaten the credibility of the QRIS and have negative consequences for ECE and school-age care (ECE-SAC) programs through skewed reimbursement rates and inaccurate marketing tied to incorrect ratings. The purpose of this brief is to illustrate the need for and benefits of building strong ECE data governance structures and implementing system-wide data management policies and practices, using the example of QRIS. (author abstract)

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46.

Best practices in ensuring data quality in quality rating and improvement systems (QRIS)
Friese, Sarah, June, 2014
(OPRE Research Brief No. 2014-47). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

Collecting and using data are core activities in a well-functioning Quality Rating and Improvement System (QRIS). Yet, data used in a QRIS are frequently housed in different systems, using different data management techniques. Ensuring a high level of QRIS data quality involves implementing a number of best practices drawn from established practices used in other fields. The purpose of this brief is to describe the specific strategies QRIS data stakeholders can use to improve upon the collection, management, and dissemination of QRIS data. The audience for this brief includes QRIS program administrators, technical assistance providers, data managers, and researchers. This brief is structured around the five stages of the Data Lifecycle: planning, collection, processing, management and distribution. Best practices are recommended for each stage of the Lifecycle. (author abstract)

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47.

A brief description of the Examining Data Informing Teaching (EDIT) measure
Akers, Lauren, November, 2016
(OPRE Brief No. 2016-104). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

This brief introduces the Examining Data Informing Teaching (EDIT) measure for researchers who seek to learn about preschool classroom teachers' use of ongoing assessment data to individualize instruction. In this brief, we discuss the EDIT's multi-method procedures, structure, and scoring; testing to date and future testing needs; a process for training EDIT raters; and potential uses of the measure. (author abstract)

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48.

Building a data sharing partnership with other organizations
Epstein, Dale J., September, 2016
(Data Direction 4, Publication # 2016-34). Bethesda, MD: Child Trends.

This is one of a set of five "Data Directions" that present issues ECE staff may encounter if they are interested in or attempting to share or link their data with other agencies. Each Data Direction presents a hypothetical scenario, and then outlines possible action steps programs could use to address the issues raised. This fourth Data Direction offers suggestions for initiating conversations with other organizations about sharing and linking data. (author abstract)

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49.

California Child Care Research Partnership: Are You In? A Systems-Level Mixed-Method Analysis of the Effects of Quality Improvement Initiatives on Participating and Non-Participating Providers
Tonyan, Holli A., 2013
California State University, Northridge

As growing numbers of children regularly attend child care settings, many states have struggled to provide enough high quality spaces to meet children's needs. Recent policy investments at the state and federal levels have focused on Quality Improvement (QI) initiatives to improve the quality of care available to children. One such effort is the California Race to the Top -- Early Learning Challenge, a program funded by a competitive federal grant (2011 to 2015) to integrate across county-level QI. Our research partnership is examining when and how child care providers engage in QI -- specifically as related to daily routine activities for children and providers. Our research focuses on licensed family child care homes (FCCH) for two reasons. First, although many of the most vulnerable children can be found in FCCH, most research has focused on center-based child care settings. Second, FCCH are a particularly flexible segment of the workforce but it is a sector that is shrinking across many states, including California. If system-building efforts like the California RTT-ELC do not take into account the unique characteristics of FCCH we may lose even more family child care providers. Our research examines two types of QI. Some initiatives provide coaching, technical assistance and professional development to improve quality, called Quality Improvement Systems (QIS). Others also include public ratings to help parents identify high quality child care, called Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS). This partnership examines quality improvement activities among family child care providers (FCCP) -- an understudied sector of the child care workforce -- in the context of California's Race to the Top Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC). Through a combination of survey and in-depth qualitative methods, the project will compare providers' experiences in two regions operating with different QRIS. In addition, follow-up visits to FCCP two years after an initial baseline visit will document changes over time during RTT-ELC implementation.

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50.

Capturing the Heterogeneity in Quality within Early Care and Education Programs Serving Preschool-Age Children
Zellman, Gail L., 2009
RAND Corporation

The goal of this study is to improve our understanding of the variation in quality within and across classrooms. To achieve this goals we use two sources of rich data on program quality and child outcomes from centers serving preschool-age children. The study has three aims: (1) determine how to combine measures of the characteristics of individual staff members in a classroom to best capture quality at the classroom level; (2) determine whether quality should be measured at the level of the staff member, classroom or center; and (3) determine whether there are ways to improve the efficiency of measuring quality at the center, classroom, and staff-member levels. The research questions include: (1) How should staff quality attributes be combined to create classroom level scores that reflect actual quality?; (2) What is the optimal unit of analysis in studying ECE quality?; and (3) Are there ways to increase efficiencies in assessing ECE center quality?

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