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1.

Accountability in early childhood: No easy answers
Meisels, Samuel J., 2006
(Occasional Paper No. 6). Chicago: Herr Research Center.

A critical discussion of accountability testing in early childhood education with recommendations for more effective early childhood program evaluation

Other

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2.

Accountability in early childhood: No easy answers [Executive summary]
Meisels, Samuel J., 2006
(Occasional Paper No. 6). Chicago: Herr Research Center.

A summary of a critical discussion of accountability testing in early childhood education, with recommendations for more effective early childhood program evaluation

Executive Summary

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3.

Achieving academic success after school: A randomized evaluation of the Higher Achievement Program
Linden, Leigh L.; Herrera, Carla; Grossman, Jean Baldwin; et al., July, 2013
Unpublished manuscript.

We assess the potential of academic OST programs through a four-year RCT of an intensive, comprehensive program. The program improves reading comprehension and problem solving scores after two years--but only the latter persists four years later. The program increases matriculation at competitive private high schools and reduces it at academically non-competitive magnet and charter schools. These effects may result from the program's intensity, specific services, and interestingly a decline in academic attitudes. Conversely, we can rule out peer effects, stemming the summer learning loss, or general adult support as mechanisms. (author abstract)

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4.

African American preschoolers' language, emergent literacy skills, and use of African American English: A complex relation
Connor, Carol McDonald; Craig, Holly K., August 2006
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 49(4), 771-792

An examination of the relation between Head Start African American preschoolers' use of African American English and their language and emergent literacy skills

Reports & Papers

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5.

Beginning to untangle the strange coupling of power within a neoliberal early education context
Brown, Christopher P.; Jeong, Hye In; Lan, Yi-Chin; et al., June, 2015
International Journal of Early Years Education, 23(2), 138-152

Policymakers across the globe continue to promote access to early education programmes as a means to improve children's readiness for school. Many of their reforms are rooted in a neoliberal conception of governance that frames policy solutions through economic rather than democratic terms. Such policies foster an image of the successful learner as one who becomes an earner and consumer rather than an active member of the larger democratic society. This shift in the conception of publicly supported early education affects teachers of young children in multiple ways. This article examines how a sample of early educators in the USA responded to a set of neoliberal reforms in their pre-kindergarten teaching context. Examining their responses, which ultimately mimicked their policy-makers' neoliberal reforms, reveals the subtlety of these policies in overtaking their attempts to resist them. It also illuminates the challenges they and other early educators face as policy-makers' neoliberal policies continue to alter the purpose and direction of early childhood. Finally, it ends by considering the ways in which early educators working in similar contexts might respond to and navigate such reforms. (author abstract)

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6.

Black parents of preschoolers educational attainment: Implications for parenting practices
Palmer, Kalani M.; Bachman, Heather J., 2015
NHSA Dialog, 17(4), 138-143

Within the Black community exists great variability in parenting practices; however very little research has examined the parenting heterogeneity within this group. Moreover studies of Black parents often contain samples with minimal variation in educational attainment. The purpose of this study was to identify the potential role of educational attainment in predicting parenting differences within the Black community. This study focused on home literacy promotion and parent involvement in school, two parenting practices often associated with children's academic achievement. The sample consisted of 103 Black parents with a wide range of educational attainment and preschool-aged children enrolled in urban child care centers. The results suggest that attainment of at least a Bachelor's degree is associated with a richer home literacy environment but the same pattern was not evident for parent involvement in school. Implications for parent engagement are discussed. (author abstract)

Executive Summary

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7.

Canadian early-childhood educators' perceptions of children's gendered shy, aggressive, and prosocial behaviors
Woods, Heather; Coplan, Robert J.; Bosacki, Sandra Leanne; et al., July-September 2016
Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 30(3), 320-333

Early childhood educators' (ECE) perceptions of gender roles may contribute to the development of children's own gender-role identities. This qualitative study examined 40 Canadian female ECEs' perceptions of gender and children's shy, aggressive, and prosocial behaviors. Content analysis of extensive interviews revealed three themes: (1) shyness as personality based, (2) influences on the behaviors, and (3) teachers' role in addressing gender and behavior. Most ECEs believed that shyness is a personality trait, exhibited equally among both genders, but displayed differently. In contrast, there were some inconsistencies as to which gender was perceived by the participants as more aggressive or prosocial. As well, findings suggested that participants believed that a teacher's role was to address behaviors within the classroom, and to help children express and understand their feelings through discussion and educational aids (e.g., books, videos, and community examples). Results are discussed in terms of educational implications and ECE training. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

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8.

Canadian early childhood educators' perceptions of young children's gender-role play and cultural identity
Servos, Jennifer E.; Coplan, Robert J.; Dewar, Brandy A.; et al., September, 2016
Journal of Early Childhood Research, 14(3), 324-332

This article investigates early childhood educators' perceptions of children's gender-role play and the impact their cultural background plays in their gender identity and play behaviors. Through qualitative in-depth interviews, early childhood educators in Canada (n = 40) were asked questions relating to their experiences with children from various cultural backgrounds, how cultural diversity impacted a child's gender identification, and who early childhood educators felt struggled more with gender identity. In general, respondents felt that cultural background could have an impact of gender identification, and that while boys and girls both struggle with gender identity, girls had the added stress of competing with popular culture expectations of gender type behaviors. (author abstract)

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9.

Canadian female and male early childhood educators' perceptions of child aggression and rough-and-tumble play
Bosacki, Sandra Leanne; Woods, Heather; Coplan, Robert J.; et al., July, 2015
Early Child Development and Care, 185(7), 1134-1147

This study investigated female and male early childhood educators' (ECEs) perceptions of young children's aggression and rough-and-tumble play in the Canadian early childhood classroom. Participants were drawn from a larger sample of ECEs who completed an online questionnaire regarding their perceptions of young children's behaviours in the classroom. This study involved n = 11 males from this sample and a matched subset of n = 11 females. Participants were presented with a series of vignettes depicting children displaying different types of aggression (i.e. relational, physical) as well as rough-and-tumble play, and completed a series of follow-up questions pertaining to their attitudes for each type of behaviour. Results showed compared to their female counterparts, male ECEs reported that both physical aggression and rough-and-tumble play held less negative social and academic implications for boys than girls. Educational implications for gender-inclusive, play-based early childhood programmes are discussed. (author abstract)

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10.

Caregivers' mediation and toddlers' emotional responses in the child care context
Frank, Ilana; Stolarski, Efrat; Scher, Anat; et al., 2006
Early Child Development and Care, 176(3-4), 239-251

A naturalistic observation study of the quality of interaction between caregivers and 18 to 30 month old children in child care centers

Reports & Papers

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11.

Center-based child care and cognitive skills development: Importance of timing and household resources
Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth; Coley, Rebekah Levine; Koury, Amanda; et al., August, 2013
Journal of Educational Psychology, 105(3), 821-838

Growing evidence has linked center-based early care and education settings to improvements in children's cognitive skills. Additional research is needed to more carefully delineate when and for whom these associations are most pronounced. Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (N = 6,350; Flanagan & West, 2004), this study examined whether the beneficial effects of center-based care settings for children's cognitive skills at age 5 differ by the age at which children experience these settings and for subgroups based on household income, parental education, and quality of the home learning environment. The results suggest that center-based preschool was supportive of the math and reading skills development of the sample as a whole. However, both center- and home-based care for 2-year-olds as well as 4-year-olds were beneficial for children from lower income, less educated, and less enriching family contexts, helping to diminish the cognitive skills gap between more and less advantaged children.

Reports & Papers

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12.

Child care aid and quality for California families: Focusing on San Francisco and Santa Clara Counties
Fuller, Bruce; Kagan, Sharon Lynn; Suzuki, Sawako; et al., 2001
(Working Paper Series 01-2). Berkeley: Policy Analysis for California Education.

A report on subsidy use and quality of child care selected by single mother welfare recipients in San Francisco and Santa Clara Counties, California

Reports & Papers

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13.

Child care quality: Centers and home settings that serve poor families
Fuller, Bruce; Kagan, Sharon Lynn; Loeb, Susanna; et al., 2004
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 19(4), 505-527

A multi-site, longitudinal study examining the quality of child care settings chosen by low-income mothers enrolled in welfare-to-work programs

Reports & Papers

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14.

Child-care quality rating and improvement systems in five pioneer states: Implementation issues and lessons learned
Zellman, Gail L.; Perlman, Michal, 2008
(MG-795-AECF/SPF/UWA). Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation.

A study of the quality rating and improvement systems (QRIS) in five early QRIS-adopting states, including descriptions of: the theory of action underlying QRISs; each state's system, including the aspects of quality included in the system; the development of each state's system; and challenges facing system designers and lessons learned from these states, all based on in-depth interviews with 4 key stakeholders in each state

Reports & Papers

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15.

Child-care quality rating and improvement systems in five pioneer states: Implementation issues and lessons learned [Executive summary]
Zellman, Gail L.; Perlman, Michal, 2008
(MG-795-AECF/SPF/UWA). Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation.

A summary of a study of the quality rating and improvement systems (QRIS) in five early QRIS-adopting states, including descriptions of: the theory of action underlying QRISs; each state's system, including the aspects of quality included in the system; the development of each state's system; and challenges facing system designers and lessons learned from these states, all based on in-depth interviews with 4 key stakeholders in each state

Executive Summary

16.

Children at home and in day care
Clarke-Stewart, K. Alison; Gruber, Christian P.; Fitzgerald, Linda M.; et al., 1994
Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Reports & Papers

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17.

Children's experiences in center-based child care as a function of teacher background and adult:child ratio
Howes, Carollee, 1997
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 43(3), 404-425

An examination of child care quality in relation to adult: child ratio and teacher education, using the Cost, Quality and Outcome (CQO) and Florida Quality Improvement study datasets

Reports & Papers

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18.

Child's play with adults, toys, and peers: An examination of family and child-care influences
Howes, Carollee; Stewart, Phyllis, 1987
Developmental Psychology, 23(3), 423-430

A study of the influences of family and child care characteristics on the play of toddlers in family child care homes, based on observations and questionnaires

Reports & Papers

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19.

Civic action and play: Examples from Maori, Aboriginal Australian and Latino communities
Adair, Jennifer Keys; Sachdeva, Shubhi; Ritchie, Jenny; et al., May/June 2017
Early Child Development and Care, 187(5-6), 798-811

Using data from an international, comparative study of civic action in preschools in New Zealand, Australia and the US, we consider some of the types of civic action that are possible when time and space are offered for children to use their agency to initiate, work together and collectively pursue ideas and things that are important to the group. We use an example from each country and apply the work of Ranciere and Arendt to think about collectivity as civic action in young children's schooling lives. Play, rather than an act itself, is positioned here as political time and space that make such civic action possible in the everyday lives of children. We argue here that play is the most common (and endangered) time and space in which children act for the collective. (author abstract)

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20.

Classification Scheme for Emergent Reading of Favorite Storybooks
Sulzby, Elizabeth, Summer 1985
Reading Research Quarterly, 20(4), 458-481

Instruments

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21.

Classroom and family effects on children's social and behavioral problems
Bennett, Patrick R.; Peters, Danya; Elliott, Marta; et al., 2005
Elementary School Journal, 105(5), 461-480

A study of the effects of family and classroom factors on the self control and behavior problems of kindergarten children, based on data from the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS, 1998/1999)

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22.

Classroom organization and student behavior in kindergarten
Finn, Jeremy D.; Pannozzo, Gina M., 2004
Journal of Educational Research, 98(2), 79-92

An investigation of the factors influencing classroom participation and engagement amongst kindergarteners, based on data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS)

Reports & Papers

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23.

Classroom Practices Inventory
Hyson, Marion C.; Rescorla, Leslie; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; et al., 1990
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 5(4), 475-494

Instruments

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24.

Classroom quality and time allocation in Tulsa's early childhood programs
Phillips, Deborah A.; Lowenstein, Amy E.; Gormley, Jr., William T.; et al., 30 March, 2007
(CROCUS Working Paper No. 9). Paper presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Boston.

A study comparing classroom time spent on instruction, instructional quality, and predictors of quality in publicly-funded universal prekindergarten programs with Head Start programs in Tulsa, Oklahoma, based on classroom observations and teacher surveys

Reports & Papers

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25.

Cognitive and noncognitive peer effects in early education
Neidell, Matthew; Waldfogel, Jane, August 2010
The Review of Economics and Statistics, 92(3), 562-576

A study of the relationship between children's social and cognitive outcomes in kindergarten and the early elementary grades and their peers' enrollment in preschool, based on kindergarten, first grade, and third grade data from the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998–1999 (ECLS-K)

Reports & Papers

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26.

Cognitive and non-cognitive peer effects in early education
Neidell, Matthew; Waldfogel, Jane, August, 2008
(NBER Working Paper Series No. 14277). Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research.

A study of the relationship of children's social and cognitive outcomes in kindergarten and the early elementary grades to their peers' enrollment in preschool, based on kindergarten, first grade, and third grade data from the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998?1999 (ECLS-K)

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27.

Compared to what? Variation in the impacts of early childhood education by alternative care type
Feller, Avi; Grindal, Todd; Miratrix, Luke W.; et al., September, 2016
Annals of Applied Statistics, 10(3), 1245-1285

Early childhood education research often compares a group of children who receive the intervention of interest to a group of children who receive care in a range of different care settings. In this paper, we estimate differential impacts of an early childhood intervention by alternative care type, using data from the Head Start Impact Study, a large-scale randomized evaluation. To do so, we utilize a Bayesian principal stratification framework to estimate separate impacts for two types of Compliers: those children who would otherwise be in other center-based care when assigned to control and those who would otherwise be in home-based care. We find strong, positive short-term effects of Head Start on receptive vocabulary for those Compliers who would otherwise be in home-based care. By contrast, we find no meaningful impact of Head Start on vocabulary for those Compliers who would otherwise be in other center-based care. Our findings suggest that alternative care type is a potentially important source of variation in early childhood education interventions. (author abstract)

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28.

Compared to what?: Variation in the impacts of early childhood education by alternative care-type settings
Feller, Avi; Grindal, Todd; Miratrix, Luke W.; et al., 30 December, 2014
Rochester, NY: Social Science Research Network.

Early childhood education research often compares a group of children who receive the intervention of interest to a group of children who receive care in a range of different care settings. In this paper, we estimate differential impacts of an early childhood intervention by alternative care setting, using data from the Head Start Impact Study, a large-scale randomized evaluation. To do so, we utilize the principal stratification framework, a generalization of the instrumental variables approach, to estimate separate impacts for two types of Compliers: those children who would otherwise be in other center-based care when assigned to control and those who would otherwise be in home-based care. We find strong, positive short-term effects of Head Start on receptive vocabulary for those Compliers who would otherwise be in home-based care. By contrast, we find no meaningful impact of Head Start on vocabulary for those Compliers who would otherwise be in other center-based care. Our findings suggest that alternative care type is a potentially important source of variation in early childhood education interventions. (author abstract)

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29.

Comparing public, private, and informal preschool programs in a national sample of low-income children
Coley, Rebekah Levine; Collins, Melissa A.; Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth; et al., Q3 2016
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 36(3), 91-105

Recent research has found that center-based early education and care (EEC) programs promote gains in cognitive skills for low-income children, but knowledge is limited concerning diverse types of EEC arrangements. This paper contrasts the primary EEC arrangements (Head Start, public centers, private centers, and home care) attended by economically disadvantaged children in the US with data on 4250 low-income children from the nationally-representative ECLS-B cohort. Results found public centers and Head Start programs provided children with the most educated and highly trained teachers and with the most enriching learning activities and global quality, with private centers showing moderate levels and home EEC very low levels of quality. Nonetheless, after adjusting for differential selection into EEC through propensity score weighting, low-income children who attended private EEC centers showed the highest math, reading, and language skills at age 5, with children attending Head Start and public centers also showing heightened math and reading skills in comparison to children experiencing only parent care. No differences were found in children's behavioral skills at age five in relation to EEC type. Results support enhanced access to all center preschool programs for low-income children, and suggest the need for greater understanding of the processes through which EEC affects children's school readiness skills. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

30.

A comparison of Head Start and school-based pre-k in Tulsa
Gormley, Jr., William T.; Adelstein, Shirley; Phillips, Deborah A.; et al., January, 2011
Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Center for Research on Children in the United States.

A summary of a comparison of the relationship of children's cognitive, socioemotional, and health outcomes to either Head Start or public prekindergarten program participation in Tulsa, Oklahoma, based on child assessments, a survey of parents and teachers, and administrative data

Fact Sheets & Briefs

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31.

The complex interplay between biology and environment: Otitis media and mediating effects on early literacy development
Roberts, Joanne E.; Burchinal, Margaret, 2001
In S. B. Neuman & D. K. Dickinson (Eds.), Handbook of early literacy research (Vol. 1, pp. 232-241). New York: Guilford Press

An examination of the influence of Otitis media with effusion (OME) on children’s early language and literacy skills, and of the interactive or independent influence of a children’s home and child care environments on early language and literacy acquisition

Other

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32.

Conforming to reform: Teaching pre-kindergarten in a neoliberal early education system
Brown, Christopher P., October, 2015
Journal of Early Childhood Research, 13(3), 236-251

Policymakers' neoliberal education reforms have altered the landscape of publicly funded early education in the United States and across the globe. Practically speaking, these reforms expect early childhood teachers to prepare their students for success in elementary school and later life by providing them with a specific set of knowledge and skills. This creates a new set of challenges for early educators who strive to prepare their culturally and linguistically diverse students for school in a manner that addresses their individual, cultural, and sociopolitical needs. The study discussed in this article set out to examine how teachers who were identified as meeting their students' various needs prepared them for success in elementary school. In doing so, it became apparent that these teachers struggled to define their practices as well as the construct of effective teaching in ways that went beyond policymakers' neoliberal conception of the early education process. This article examines this tension and considers what is possible for teachers and the field of publicly funded early education in these highly structured neoliberal systems of governance. (author abstract)

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33.

The contracts of literacy: What children learn from learning to read books
Snow, Catherine; Ninio, Anat, 1986
In Emergent literacy: Writing and reading (pp. 116-138). Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing.

A description of the information about books and texts that children learn while learning to read

Other

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34.

Controlled diversity: An overview of the Japanese preschool system
Boocock, Sarane S., 1989
Journal of Japanese Studies, 15(1), 41-65

A description of the Japanese preschool system and its possible contributions to social control

Reports & Papers

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35.

Describing oral language opportunities and environments in Head Start and other preschool classrooms
Smith, Miriam W.; Dickinson, David K., 1994
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 9(3-4), 345-366

A discussion of the influence of classroom circumstances, pedagogical orientation and activity settings on early language and literacy development

Reports & Papers

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36.

A developmental perspective on full- versus part-day kindergarten and children’s academic trajectories through fifth grade
Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth; Maldonado-Carreno, Carolina; Li-Grining, Christine P.; et al., July/August 2008
Child Development, 79(4), 957-978

An examination of the relationship between time spent in kindergarten and primary school math and reading achievement in a sample of several thousand children

Reports & Papers

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37.

''Does not.'' ''Does too.'': Thinking about play in the early childhood classroom
McLane, Joan B., 2003
(Occasional Paper No. 4). Chicago: Herr Research Center.

A longitudinal study of early childhood teachers' attitudes regarding the educational value of play

Reports & Papers

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38.

''Does not.'' ''Does too.'': Thinking about play in the early childhood classroom [Executive summary]
McLane, Joan B., 2003
(Occasional Paper No. 4). Chicago: Herr Research Center.

A summary of a longitudinal study of early childhood teachers' attitudes regarding the educational value of play

Executive Summary

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39.

"Doing the math": Maternal beliefs about early mathematics versus language learning
Cannon, Joanna; Ginsburg, Herbert P., 2008
Early Education and Development, 19(2), 238-260

An examination of maternal approaches to the mathematical learning of their preschoolers, and a study of maternal beliefs about the importance of mathematics versus language learning in the preschool years, based on a sample of 37 New York City area mothers

Reports & Papers

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40.

Do investments in universal early education pay off?: Long-term effects of introducing kindergarten into public schools
Cascio, Elizabeth U., May, 2009
(NBER Working Paper Series No. 14951). Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research.

An analysis of the long-term effects of state-sponsored kindergarten programs on children's outcomes, based on data form the Public Use Microdata Samples (PINS)

Reports & Papers

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41.

Do the short-term effects of a high-quality preschool program persist?
Hill, Carolyn J.; Gormley, Jr., William T.; Adelstein, Shirley; et al., Q3 2015
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 32(3), 60-79

We investigate the persistence of short-term effects of a high-quality school-based pre-kindergarten program in Tulsa, Oklahoma. We analyze third-grade reading and math scores for two cohorts of students eligible to participate in pre-kindergarten in 2000-2001 and 2005-2006, using boosted regression and propensity score matching to select a comparison group of local students who did not participate in the pre-K program. For the early cohort, we find no evidence of persistence of early gains. For the late cohort, we find that early gains persist through third grade in math but not reading, and for boys but not for girls. We discuss possible reasons for the pattern of findings, though our study design does not allow us to identify the causal mechanisms of persistence. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

42.

Do the short-term effects of a strong preschool program persist?
Hill, Carolyn J.; Gormley, Jr., William T.; Adelstein, Shirley; et al., January, 2012
(CROCUS Working Paper No. 18). Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Center for Research on Children in the United States

A study of the relationship of participation in Oklahoma's universal public prekindergarten program to third grade reading and math scores, based on data collected from a cohort of 1,038 third grade children who had participated in the Tulsa Public Schools prekindergarten program and 961 comparison nonparticipants, and from a second cohort of 1,087 participants and 937 comparison nonparticipants

Reports & Papers

43.

Eager to learn: Educating our preschoolers
Bowman, Barbara T.; Burns, M. Susan; Donovan, M. Suzanne; et al., 2001
Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

A text by the Committee on Early Childhood Pedagogy that reviews the early childhood research literature regarding programs outside the home, and makes recommendations for improving the quality of early childhood care and education in the United States

Other

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44.

Early childhood education by MOOC: Lessons from Sesame Street
Kearney, Melissa Schettini; Levine, Phillip B., June, 2015
(NBER Working Paper No. 21229). Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research.

Sesame Street is one of the largest early childhood interventions ever to take place. It was introduced in 1969 as an educational, early childhood program with the explicit goal of preparing preschool age children for school entry. Millions of children watched a typical episode in its early years. Well-designed studies at its inception provided evidence that watching the show generated an immediate and sizeable increase in test scores. In this paper we investigate whether the first cohorts of preschool children exposed to Sesame Street experienced improved outcomes subsequently. We implement an instrumental variables strategy exploiting limitations in television technology generated by distance to a broadcast tower and UHF versus VHF transmission to distinguish counties by Sesame Street reception quality. We relate this geographic variation to outcomes in Census data including grade-for-age status in 1980, educational attainment in 1990, and labor market outcomes in 2000. The results indicate that Sesame Street accomplished its goal of improving school readiness; preschool-aged children in areas with better reception when it was introduced were more likely to advance through school as appropriate for their age. This effect is particularly pronounced for boys and non-Hispanic, black children, as well as children living in economically disadvantaged areas. The evidence regarding the impact on ultimate educational attainment and labor market outcomes is inconclusive. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

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45.

Early childhood intervention and juvenile delinquency: An exploratory analysis of the Chicago Child-Parent Centers
Reynolds, Arthur J.; Temple, Judy A.; Chang, Heesuk; et al., June 1998
Evaluation Review, 22(3), 341-372

An investigation of the relationship between participation in the Chicago Child-Parent Center and Expansion (CPC) Program, during preschool to third grade, and measures of juvenile delinquency among a sample of low income, mainly African American youths, using data from the Chicago Longitudinal Study

Reports & Papers

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46.

Early day care, infant-mother attachment, and maternal responsiveness in the infants' first year
Burchinal, Margaret; Ramey, Craig T.; Lee, Marvin W.; et al., 1992
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 7(2), 383-396

A longitudinal study on the impact of non maternal child care on mother-child relationships and infants’ insecure maternal attachments

Reports & Papers

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47.

Early intervention and mediating processes in cognitive performance of children of low-income African American families
Burchinal, Margaret; Campbell, Frances A.; Ramey, Craig T.; et al., 1997
Child Development, 68(5), 935-954

A longitudinal study of the importance of the relationship among better cognitive performance, early intervention child care and responsive stimulating family care on low income African American children

Reports & Papers

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48.

Early mathematical experiences: Observing young Black and White children's everyday activities
Tudge, Jonathan R.H.; Doucet, Fabienne, 2004
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 19(1), 21-29

An examination of the extent to which young children are engaged in mathematics in the course of their everyday activities, and a look at whether or not such patterns vary by ethnicity or social class

Reports & Papers

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49.

The effects of daycare intervention in the preschool years of the narrative skills of poverty children in kindergarten
Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Farran, Dale Clark, 1994
International Journal of Behavioral Development, 17(3), 503-523

A study of the effects of child care intervention on the narrative skills of poverty children in kindergarten

Reports & Papers

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50.

The effects of intervention and social class on children's answers to concrete and abstract questions
Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Fendt, Kaye, 1991
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 21(1), 115-130

A study of whether a preschool intervention program would help poverty children perform better on answering abstract questions

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