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Handy Manny and the emergent literacy technology toolkit
Hourcade, Jack J., April 2010
Early Childhood Education Journal, 37(6), 483-491

An outline of the use of a technology toolkit to support emergent literacy curriculum and instruction in early childhood education settings, a description of hardware and software, and recommendations for implementation for children at risk of academic difficulties

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Missing the boat with technology usage in early childhood settings: A 21st century view of developmentally appropriate practice
Parette, Howard P., March 2010
Early Childhood Education Journal, 37(5), 335-343

An argument for technology usage as a developmentally appropriate practice and its implications for pre-service education and in-service professional development

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Preschool teacher perceptions of assistive technology and professional development responses
Stoner, Julia B., 2008
Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, 43(1), 77-91

A study of preschool teachers’ experiences with and perceptions of assistive technology (AT), including their concerns about the implementation of a school-wide assistive technology program, based on interview and questionnaire responses of 9 teachers of at-risk and special needs classrooms at 1 school

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Teaching word recognition to young children who are at risk using Microsoft® PowerPoint™ coupled with direct instruction
Parette, Howard P., April 2009
Early Childhood Education Journal, 36(5), 393-401

Recommendations regarding the combined use of direct instruction (DI) and PowerPoint software when teaching of word recognition to at risk young children

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Technology user groups and early childhood education: A preliminary study
Parette, Howard P., May, 2013
Early Childhood Education Journal, 41(3), 171-179

This article presents a preliminary examination of the potential of Technology User Groups as a professional development venue for early childhood education professionals in developing operational and functional competence in using hardware and software components of a Technology toolkit. Technology user groups are composed of varying numbers of participants having an interest in technology, and are led by one or more skilled facilitators who meet with participants across time to help them acquire and demonstrate new technology skill sets. A series of these groups were conducted with seven early education professionals serving young preschool children who were at risk or who had disabilities. The impact of these technology user groups was examined using self-reports subsequent to individual participation. Specific data were collected regarding the types of technologies that had been used, and the types of classroom instructional products that had been created and implemented in classrooms using the technologies. A discussion of the value of technology user groups is presented. (author abstract)

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Use of Writing with Symbols 2000 software to facilitate emergent literacy development
Parette, Howard P., October 2008
Early Childhood Education Journal, 36(2), 161-170

An overview of several potential uses of a specific software program in the teaching of literacy skills to young children

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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