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1.

After-school pursuits: An examination of outcomes in the San Francisco Beacon Initiative
Walker, Karen E.; Arbreton, Amy, 2004
Philadelphia: Public/Private Ventures.

A study of the San Francisco Beacon Initiative, a citywide after-school program, including their approach to fostering high-quality activities and participation amongst young people, whether their high-quality after-school program is producing positive developmental experiences for participating young people, and consequently, is it producing improved wellbeing and academic performance for participants

Reports & Papers

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2.

After-school pursuits: An examination of outcomes in the San Francisco Beacon Initiative: Executive summary
Walker, Karen E.; Arbreton, Amy, 2004
Philadelphia: Public/Private Ventures.

A summary of a program evaluation of the San Francisco Beacon Initiative (SFBI), a community-based after school program

Executive Summary

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3.

Child care quality: Centers and home settings that serve poor families
Fuller, Bruce; Kagan, Sharon Lynn; Loeb, Susanna; et al., 2004
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 19(4), 505-527

A multi-site, longitudinal study examining the quality of child care settings chosen by low-income mothers enrolled in welfare-to-work programs

Reports & Papers

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4.

Effectively expanding California's after school system: Overcoming the workforce supply obstacle
Children Now (Organization), March, 2008
Oakland, CA: Children Now.

A discussion of staffing challenges facing after school programs in California as a result of increased state after school funding

Fact Sheets & Briefs

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5.

Growing Up in Poverty Project 
Fuller, Bruce,
Berkeley, CA: Policy Analysis for California Education

A longitudinal study of the effects of mothers moving from welfare-to-work on their economic well-being, home environment, child care quality and use, and their young children's early development

Major Research Projects

6.

New lives for poor families?: Mothers and young children move through welfare reform: The Growing Up in Poverty Project: Wave 2 findings: California, Connecticut, and Florida: Executive summary
Fuller, Bruce; Kagan, Sharon Lynn; Loeb, Susanna; et al., 2002
Berkeley: Policy Analysis for California Education.

A summary of a study of 948 mothers and their preschool-age children who entered new welfare-to-work programs in California, Connecticut, and Florida

Executive Summary

7.

New lives for poor families?: Mothers and young children move through welfare reform: The Growing Up in Poverty Project: Wave 2 findings: California, Connecticut, and Florida: Technical report
Fuller, Bruce; Kagan, Sharon Lynn; Loeb, Susanna; et al., 2002
Berkeley: Policy Analysis for California Education.

A study of the long-term effects of welfare reform on mothers' employment, children's development, and family well-being among a sample of mothers and preschool-age children who entered new welfare programs in California, Connecticut, and Florida

Reports & Papers

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8.

One step at a time: The effects of an early literacy text messaging program for parents of preschoolers
York, Benjamin N.; Loeb, Susanna, November, 2014
(NBER Working Paper No. 20659). Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research.

Substantial systematic differences exist in children's home learning experiences. The few existing parenting programs that have shown promise often are not widely accessible, either due to the demands they place on parents' time and effort or cost. In this study, we evaluate the effects of READY4K!, a text messaging program for parents of preschoolers designed to help them support their children's literacy development. The program targets the behavioral barriers to good parenting by breaking down the complexity of parenting into small steps that are easy-to-achieve and providing continuous support for an entire school year. We find that READY4K! positively affected the extent to which parents engaged in home literacy activities with their children by 0.22 to 0.34 standard deviations, as well as parental involvement at school by 0.13 to 0.19 standard deviations. Increases in parental activity at home and school translated into student learning gains in some areas of early literacy, ranging from approximately 0.21 to 0.34 standard deviations. The widespread use, low cost, and ease of scalability of text messaging make texting an attractive approach to supporting parenting practices. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

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9.

Paying the price for the high cost of preschool in California
Lee, Brian, 2006
Oakland: Fight Crime: Invest in Kids California.

A brief report using previous research to demonstrate how the lack of state funding and the high price of California's child care programs keep young at risk children from attending

Fact Sheets & Briefs

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10.

The power of a good idea: How the San Francisco school district is building a prek-3rd grade bridge
Nyhan, Paul, June, 2015
Washington, DC: New America Foundation.

In 2008 the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) confronted a problem that has been growing for decades. It boasted the highest academic performance of any large urban district in California, yet its achievement gap was widening, as too many African American, Latino, and low-income students fell far behind their classmates. The gap was perhaps clearest in the city's Bayview and Mission neighborhoods, where only a quarter of African American and Latino students read at grade level in third grade, compared to three-quarters of white students districtwide. Throughout the school system, 40 percent of African American students and 48 percent of Latino students were at grade level in math by second grade, compared to 88 percent of white students in 2011-12. The achievement gap was the greatest challenge facing the school district, one that revealed systemic disconnects throughout its schools and programs, beginning with its youngest students. This is the story of how the district began narrowing the gap by rethinking its approach to teaching and learning in pre-K, kindergarten, and the early grades of elementary school. District leaders worked to align curricula, professional development, assessments, and even classroom layouts across the PreK-3rd grade continuum, initially focusing on connections between pre-K and kindergarten. To lead this ambitious effort, the district turned to its underfunded and sometimes overlooked Child Development Program, which ran its pre-K classrooms. (author abstract)

Other

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11.

The power of a good idea: How the San Francisco school district is building a prek-3rd grade bridge [Executive summary]
Nyhan, Paul, June, 2015
Washington, DC: New America Foundation.

In 2008 the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) confronted a problem that has been growing for decades. It boasted the highest academic performance of any large urban district in California, yet its achievement gap was widening, as too many African American, Latino, and low-income students fell far behind their classmates. The gap was perhaps clearest in the city's Bayview and Mission neighborhoods, where only a quarter of African American and Latino students read at grade level in third grade, compared to three-quarters of white students districtwide. Throughout the school system, 40 percent of African American students and 48 percent of Latino students were at grade level in math by second grade, compared to 88 percent of white students in 2011-12. The achievement gap was the greatest challenge facing the school district, one that revealed systemic disconnects throughout its schools and programs, beginning with its youngest students. This is the story of how the district began narrowing the gap by rethinking its approach to teaching and learning in pre-K, kindergarten, and the early grades of elementary school. District leaders worked to align curricula, professional development, assessments, and even classroom layouts across the PreK-3rd grade continuum, initially focusing on connections between pre-K and kindergarten. To lead this ambitious effort, the district turned to its underfunded and sometimes overlooked Child Development Program, which ran its pre-K classrooms. (author abstract)

Executive Summary

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12.

PreK-3 alignment in California's education system: Obstacles and opportunities
Valentino, Rachel A.; Stipek, Deborah J., May, 2016
Stanford, CA: Policy Analysis for California Education.

Empirical evidence that horizontal alignment of policies and practices from preschool through the early elementary grades sustains the effects of quality preschool and contributes to children's learning is scarce, as discussed above, but there are nevertheless good reasons to expect benefits to such alignment. Moreover, many districts and schools in California and throughout the country are working to strengthen preK-3 alignment. The purpose of this report is to document: 1) how key district and policy leaders in California conceptualize preK-3 alignment; 2) what kinds of policies and practices districts have implemented to achieve alignment; 3) what kinds of efforts and practices have been successful and the critical ingredients of their success; and 4) the main barriers districts and schools have encountered when attempting to achieve horizontal alignment between preschool and the elementary grades. To achieve this goal, we conducted interviews with individuals across the state. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers

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13.

Preschool and school readiness: Experiences of children with non-English-speaking parents
Cannon, Jill S.; Jacknowitz, Alison; Karoly, Lynn A.; et al., May, 2012
San Francisco: Public Policy Institute of California.

A study in both California and the United States as a whole of the demographic characteristics and child care arrangements of children with immigrant parents who do not speak English well, the characteristics of center-based settings attended by these children, and the relationship of center-based care use to their academic skills at school entry, based on survey and observation data from a study of preschool in California and on data from a longitudinal study of the development and experiences of children born in 2001 in the United States

Reports & Papers

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14.

Preschool and school readiness: Experiences of children with non-English-speaking parents: Technical appendices
Cannon, Jill S.; Jacknowitz, Alison; Karoly, Lynn A.; et al., 2012
San Francisco: Public Policy Institute of California.

Technical appendices to a study in both California and the United States as a whole of the demographic characteristics and child care arrangements of children with immigrant parents who do not speak English well, the characteristics of center-based settings attended by these children, and the relationship of center-based care use to their academic skills at school entry, based on survey and observation data from a study of preschool in California and on data from a longitudinal study of the development and experiences of children born in 2001 in the United States

Other

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15.

Public safety can't wait: California's preschool shortage, a missed opportunity for crime prevention
Lee, Brian; van der Does, Louise, 2005
Oakland, CA: Fight Crime: Invest in Kids California.

An overview of data on both the links between children's quality preschool program attendance and later reduced participation in criminal activity, and the barriers to quality preschool access for low income children in California

Other

16.

Public safety can't wait: California's preschool shortage a missed opportunity for crime prevention [Executive summary]
Lee, Brian; van der Does, Louise, 2005
Oakland, CA: Fight Crime: Invest in Kids California.

A summary of an overview of data on both the links between children's quality preschool program attendance and later reduced participation in criminal activity, and the barriers to quality preschool access for low income children in California

Executive Summary

17.

Standardized childhood: The political and cultural struggle over early education
Fuller, Bruce; Pai, Seeta A.; Bridges, Margaret; et al., 2007
Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press

An examination of the debate surrounding the state-run expansion and standardization of preschool, based on ethnographic classroom-based research, case studies of universal preschool programs in Oklahoma and Los Angeles, and a critical review of empirical research

Reports & Papers

18.

Working together to build Beacon Centers in San Francisco: Evaluation findings from 1998-2000
Walker, Karen E.; Arbreton, Amy, 2001
Philadelphia: Public/Private Ventures.

An exploration of the influence of the Beacon Centers on children’s well-being, based on data gathered from surveys of centers, host schools, and student participants in San Francisco

Reports & Papers

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