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Carolina Abecedarian Project and the Carolina Approach to Responsive Education (CARE), Age 21 Follow Up Study
Campbell, Frances A., January, 2014
Campbell, Frances, and Elizabeth Pungello. Carolina Abecedarian Project (ABC) and the Carolina Approach to Responsive Education (CARE), Age 21 Follow Up Study, 1993 - 2003. ICPSR32262-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research[distributor], 2014-01-31. doi:10.3886/ICPSR32262.v1

The Carolina Abecedarian (ABC) Project and the Carolina Approach to Responsive Education (CARE) projects consist of two consecutive longitudinal studies on the effectiveness of early childhood educational intervention for children at high risk for developmental delays and school failure. Combined, the two studies test the hypothesis that child care, home visit, and home school resource interventions can enhance cognitive and academic outcomes for children at risk for school failure due to factors such as poverty, low maternal IQ, or low parental education. These studies provide the only experimental data regarding the efficacy of child care interventions that began during early infancy and lasted until the child entered kindergarten. In addition, the data allow for tests of the efficacy of intervention during the primary grades. Research hypotheses include: Within this high-risk sample, early cumulative risk will be negatively associated with young adult educational outcomes, employment outcomes, avoidance of teen parenthood, and avoidance of criminal behavior. Early intervention will moderate the effects of risk such that the effects of increased risk would be weaker for those who received the intervention than for those who did not. The early home environment would mediate any found effects for early risk and that early educational intervention would moderate the effects of the early home environment such that the effects of a poor-quality home environment would be weaker for those who received treatment compared to those who did not. Further information can be found on the Carolina Abecedarian Project Web site (http://abc.fpg.unc.edu/).

Data Sets


A governor's guide to early literacy: Getting all students reading by third grade
National Governors' Association. Center for Best Practices, October, 2013
Washington, DC: National Governors' Association, Center for Best Practices.

A discussion of five policies to promote children's grade-level reading by third grade

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A governor's guide to early literacy: Getting all students reading by third grade [Executive summary]
National Governors' Association. Center for Best Practices, October, 2013
Washington, DC: National Governors' Association, Center for Best Practices.

A summary of a discussion of five policies to promote children's grade-level reading by third grade

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Improving QRISs through the use of existing data: A virtual pilot of the California QRIS
Zellman, Gail L., 2014
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, (), 1-14

Available research underscores the value of using data to make and modify the many decisions required to design a child care quality rating and improvement system (QRIS). This paper argues for analyzing existing program data to address key questions and decisions in the early design stages of a QRIS, even in advance of pilot activities. We employed two datasets covering California ECE programs to provide cost-effective and timely input to policymakers for the proposed California QRIS, a block design system with five quality elements and five rating tiers. The first data source is the provider sample component of the 2007 RAND California Preschool Study (CPS), which represents all California providers. The second dataset derives from quality measurement of the ECE providers required to participate in San Francisco County's Gateway to Quality (GTQ) initiative. To address the study questions, we replicated as closely as possible the proposed QRIS rating structure for the available quality elements. Our "virtual pilot" analysis had limitations: we could examine only three of the five quality elements. Findings revealed that most programs in our statewide center-based sample would rate better on some quality elements than others. GTQ data revealed that center-based classrooms serving infants and toddlers did not score as well as those serving preschool-age children and home-based programs scored considerably lower on the applicable Environmental Rating Scale (ERS) than center-based programs. (author abstract)

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Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale Parent Questionnaire
Cryer, Debby, 1997
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 12(1), 35-58

Instruments


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Study of California's transitional kindergarten program: Report on the first year of implementation
Quick, Heather, April, 2014
Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research.

In 2010, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed the Kindergarten Readiness Act (Senate Bill [S.B.] 1381) into law. The law changed the date by which children must turn 5 to enter kindergarten from December 2 to September 1, phasing in the new age requirement by moving the cutoff date back one month per year for three years, beginning in fall 2012. S.B. 1381 also established a new grade level--transitional kindergarten (TK)--which is the first year of a two-year kindergarten experience for students born between September 2 and December 2. When fully implemented, TK is intended to provide an additional year of early education to this group of children, with the goal of promoting their school readiness. With the support of the Heising-Simons Foundation and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, American Institutes for Research (AIR) conducted an investigation of the planning and implementation of TK in the 2012-13 school year. The study addressed the following broad research questions: 1. What was the landscape of TK programs in California in the program's first year? 2. How did districts and schools plan for, structure, and support their TK programs? 3. How was TK implemented at the classroom level, and how did TK differ from kindergarten? 4. Are districts using TK as an opportunity to build greater articulation between preschool and grades K-3? If so, how? 5. What were the challenges and lessons learned in planning for and implementing TK? To address these questions and the complexities of the implementation of a statewide policy initiative, AIR conducted a mixed-methods study examining these issues at multiple levels of the system. Data collection strategies included surveys of district administrators (both a short-form census survey and a longer survey for a sample of districts), principals, and TK and kindergarten teachers; classroom observations; case study interviews; and parent focus groups. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


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Study of California's transitional kindergarten program: Report on the first year of implementation [Executive summary]
Quick, Heather, April, 2014
Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research.

In 2010, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed the Kindergarten Readiness Act (Senate Bill [S.B.] 1381) into law. The law changed the date by which children must turn 5 to enter kindergarten from December 2 to September 1, phasing in the new age requirement by moving the cutoff date back one month per year for three years, beginning in fall 2012. S.B. 1381 also established a new grade level--transitional kindergarten (TK)--which is the first year of a two-year kindergarten experience for students born between September 2 and December 2. When fully implemented, TK is intended to provide an additional year of early education to this group of children, with the goal of promoting their school readiness. With the support of the Heising-Simons Foundation and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, American Institutes for Research (AIR) conducted an investigation of the planning and implementation of TK in the 2012-13 school year. The study addressed the following broad research questions: 1. What was the landscape of TK programs in California in the program's first year? 2. How did districts and schools plan for, structure, and support their TK programs? 3. How was TK implemented at the classroom level, and how did TK differ from kindergarten? 4. Are districts using TK as an opportunity to build greater articulation between preschool and grades K-3? If so, how? 5. What were the challenges and lessons learned in planning for and implementing TK? To address these questions and the complexities of the implementation of a statewide policy initiative, AIR conducted a mixed-methods study examining these issues at multiple levels of the system. Data collection strategies included surveys of district administrators (both a short-form census survey and a longer survey for a sample of districts), principals, and TK and kindergarten teachers; classroom observations; case study interviews; and parent focus groups. (author abstract)

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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