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Current Filters: Pub Year:2005 [remove]; Full Text:no [remove];

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2004 census of child care services
Australia. Department of Family and Community Services, 2005
Canberra, Australian Capital Territory: Australia, Department of Family and Community Services.

A report of findings from the 2004 Australian Government Census of Child Care Services, which are compared to findings from the 2002 census

Reports & Papers


2004 census of child care services: Summary booklet
Australia. Department of Family and Community Services, 2005
Canberra, Australian Capital Territory: Australia, Department of Family and Community Services.

A compilation of data from the Australian government’s 2004 national census of child care services, recording child care participation trends, rates, and costs

Executive Summary


2004 community needs assessment: ''Child care in New York City--a neighborhood analysis of supply and demand''
Kelly, Jennell, 2005
New York: Child Care, Inc.

A report identifying New York City neighborhoods that have the greatest need for the development of child care programs

Other


2005 California child care portfolio
California Child Care Resource and Referral Network, 2005
San Francisco: California Child Care Resource and Referral Network.

Research on the demographics of child care supply and demand and profiles of family child care options, issues and concerns in counties of California in 2005

Other


2005 child development center survey
Kern County Child Care Council, 2005
Bakersfield, CA: Kern County Child Care Council. (No longer accessible as of August 29, 2013).

A survey of the characteristics of child care workers in child development centers in Kern County, California

Reports & Papers


21st Century Community Learning Center program: A study to evaluate the success of a program in a rural county in east Tennessee
Collingsworth, Joy, 2005
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City

An investigation of the impact of a 21st Century Community Learning Center program on students and their families in three schools in rural Tennessee and an examination of the extent to which the program successfully implemented criteria deemed necessary by the United States Department of Education

Reports & Papers


21st Century Community Learning Centers: Evaluation of projects funded for the 2003-04 school year
Texas Education Agency, January, 2005
Austin, TX: Texas Education Agency.

An examination of the impact of children’s participation in after school learning programs, created or expanded pursuant to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act as amended by the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001, on their academic performance in various categories

Reports & Papers


21st Century Community Learning Centers: Evaluation of projects funded for the 2003-04 school year [Executive summary]
Texas Education Agency, January, 2005
Austin, TX: Texas Education Agency.

A summary of an examination of the impact of children’s participation in after school learning programs, created or expanded pursuant to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act as amended by the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001, on their academic performance in various categories

Executive Summary


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ABCs of early mathematics experiences
Hansen, Laurie E., 2005
Teaching Children Mathematics, 12(4), 208-212

A discussion of how concepts in mathematics can be introduced through life experiences in preschool classrooms and at home, such as in activities involving nature, money, playing, bathing, and cooking

Other


Addressing social-emotional development and infant mental health in early childhood systems
Zeanah, Paula D., 2005
(Building State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Series No. 12). University of California, Los Angeles, National Center for Infant and Early Childhood Health Policy.

A policy report addressing several issues associated with infant mental health (IMH), including organization; delivery of services; and funding and training opportunities

Reports & Papers


Addressing socio-emotional development and infant mental health in early childhood systems: Executive summary
Zeanah, Paula D., 2005
(Building State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Series No. 12). University of California, Los Angeles, National Center for Infant and Early Childhood Health Policy.

A study of the necessity to focus child care and early education efforts on infant mental health and development, with policy recommendations and strategies for implementation, the meaning of infant mental health, and the development of systems for delivering infant mental health services

Executive Summary


Administration's TANF proposal would not free up $2 billion for child care
Greenberg, Mark H., 2005
Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy.

A discussion of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) reauthorization proposal, and how such changes would not actually free up $2 billion for states to use for child care

Fact Sheets & Briefs


An African American youth mentoring program: A pilot study
Johnson, Martin K., 2005
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA

An investigation of the effectiveness of a youth mentoring program in terms of character, skills, and attitude development in order to help prepare African American young people for school and life success

Reports & Papers


Afterschool learning: A study of academically focused afterschool programs in New Hampshire
New Hampshire. Department of Education, January, 2005
Concord: New Hampshire, Dept. of Education.

A presentation of findings from a study of the impact of academically-focused afterschool programs on students’ school success, based on data from 29 afterschool programs

Reports & Papers


Afterschool learning: A study of academically focused afterschool programs in New Hampshire [Executive summary]
New Hampshire. Department of Education, January 2005
Concord: New Hampshire, Dept. of Education.

A summary of a presentation of findings from a study of the impact of academically-focused after school programs on students’ school success, based on data from 29 after school programs

Executive Summary


An after-school program for elementary school aged children: Academic and socio-emotional outcomes
Vanderploeg, Jeffrey J., 2005
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH

An investigation of the effects of an after-school program on elementary school students' academic and socioemotional outcomes, examining the relationship between students' outcomes and duration of program participation

Reports & Papers


After-school programs, antisocial behavior, and positive youth development: An exploration of the relationship between program implementation and changes in youth behavior
Weisman, Stephanie A., February 2005
In J.L. Mahoney, R.W. Larson, & J.S. Eccles (Eds.), Organized activities as contexts of development: Extracurricular activities, after-school and community programs. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum

A National Survey of the activity patterns of American parents and on how they divide their time among work, household tasks, child care, and leisure activities and information on feelings about various parenting activities was also ascertained

Reports & Papers


Alabama early childhood development facts
Children's Defense Fund (U.S.), 2005
Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund.

A statistical fact sheet on Alabama's low income families, preschool children, and its early childhood education system, including the state preschool program, the Alabama Pre-kindergarten Initiative

Fact Sheets & Briefs


Alabama PK expulsion fact sheet
Gilliam, Walter S., 2005
New York: Foundation for Child Development.

A fact sheet detailing statistics on Alabama's preschool children, including comparing the state's expulsion rate with the nation's expulsion rate

Fact Sheets & Briefs


Alaska early childhood development facts
Children's Defense Fund (U.S.), 2005
Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund.

A brief review of statistics regarding the dearth of early childhood services available to working families in the state of Alaska

Fact Sheets & Briefs


Alaska PK expulsion fact sheet
Gilliam, Walter S., 2005
New York: Foundation for Child Development.

A statistical fact sheet on the expulsion rate of the Alaska State Funded Head Start program as compared with the national expulsion rate for state funded preschools

Fact Sheets & Briefs


All together now: State experiences in using community-based child care to provide pre-kindergarten
Schumacher, Rachel, 2005
(Child Care and Early Education Series Brief No. 5). Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy.

A review of findings from a Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) state survey regarding implementation of the mixed delivery model, in which prekindergarten is provided by community-based settings and schools

Fact Sheets & Briefs


All together now: State experiences in using community-based child care to provide pre-kindergarten
Schumacher, Rachel, 2005
Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy.

A discussion of the findings from a survey of 29 states conducted by the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP), which examined the policies, opportunities, and challenges associated with including community based child care providers as part of the states' prekindergarten programs

Reports & Papers


American Community Survey (ACS): Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) 1996
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2005
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY (ACS): PUBLIC USE MICRODATA SAMPLE, 1996 [Computer file]. ICPSR03885-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census [producer], 1998. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-07-06.

The American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities with a fresh look at how they are changing. It will replace the decennial long form in future censuses and is a critical element in the Bureau of the Census' re-engineered 2010 census. The decennial census has two parts, the short form, which counts the population, and the long form, which obtains demographic, housing, social and economic information from a 1-in-6 sample of households. Conducted under the authority of Title 13, United States Code, Sections 141 and 193, full implementation of the American Community Survey is planned in every county in the United States. The survey would include approximately three million households. Response is mandatory and data are collected by mail with Bureau of the Census staff conducting a follow-up with those who do not respond. The goals of the American Community Survey are to provide an information base to federal, state, and local governments for the administration and evaluation of their programs, to improve the 2010 Census, and to provide users with timely demographic, housing, social, and economic data every year for all states, as well as for all cities, counties, metropolitan areas, and population groups.The scope of the 1996 ACS was limited to housing units, occupied and vacant, in four sites. The four sites represented a broad mix of geographic areas ranging from a large, central city in a metropolitan area to a small nonmetropolitan county. These sites (1) Rockland County, New York; (2) Brevard County, Florida; (3) Fulton County, Pennsylvania; and (4) Multnomah County, Oregon and the city of Portland, Oregon.

Data Sets


American Community Survey (ACS): Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) 1997
United States. Bureau of the Census, 2005
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY (ACS): PUBLIC USE MICRODATA SAMPLE, 1997 [Computer file]. ICPSR03885-v1. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census [producer], 1998. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-07-06.

The American Community Survey(ACS) is a nationwide survey designed to provide communities with a fresh look at how they are changing. It will replace the decennial long form in future censuses and is a critical element in the Bureau of the Census' re-engineered 2010 census. The decennial census has two parts, the short form, which counts the population, and the long form, which obtains demographic, housing, social and economic information from a 1-in-6 sample of households. Conducted under the authority of Title 13, United States Code, Sections 141 and 193, full implementation of the American Community Survey is planned in every county in the United States. The survey would include approximately three million households. Response is mandatory and data are collected by mail with Bureau of the Census staff conducting a follow-up with those who do not respond. The goals of the American Community Survey are to provide an information base to federal, state, and local governments for the administration and evaluation of their programs, to improve the 2010 Census, and to provide data users with timely demographic, housing, social, and economic data that can be compared across states, communities, and population groups. The American Community Survey will provide estimates of demographic, housing, social, and economic characteristics every year for all states, as well as for all cities, counties, metropolitan areas, and population groups. The scope of the 1997 ACS was limited to housing units, occupied and vacant, in eight sites: (1) Rockland County, New York, (2) Brevard County, Florida, (3) Fulton County, Pennsylvania, (4) Multnomah County and the city of Portland, Oregon, (5) Douglas County, Nebraska, (6) Franklin County, Ohio, (7) Harris and Fort Bend Counties (Houston), Texas, and (8) Otero County, New Mexico. Data from Pennsylvania and New Mexico were not released.

Data Sets


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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