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Current Filters: State:ILLINOIS [remove]; Classification:Early Head Start/Head Start [remove];

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Better outcomes for all: Promoting partnerships between Head Start and state pre-k
Stebbins, Helene, January, 2007
Washington, DC: Pre-K Now.

A study examining how Head Start and state-funded prekindergarten programs can coordinate service delivery, based on in-depth interviews with program providers, state prekindergarten program directors, and state Head Start collaboration coordinators

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Building on the promise: State initiatives to expand access to Early Head Start for young children and their families
Schumacher, Rachel, April, 2008
Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy.

Congress' reauthorization of Head Start and Early Head Start in 2007, when fully funded, will present new opportunities for building on and expanding EHS that states should capture. Some states have taken action to expand and enhance Early Head Start services for infants, toddlers, and their families. This brief is an in-depth study of these state efforts, and includes an analysis of the lessons learned from state experiences and recommendations to help other states expand the reach of Early Head Start. (author abstract)

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Classroom-based interventions and teachers' perceived job stressors and confidence: Evidence from a randomized trial in Head Start settings
Zhai, Fuhua, Q4 2011
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 26(4), 442-452

A study of the impacts of the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP) classroom-based intervention on teachers' perceived job stressors and confidence, as indexed by their perceptions of job control, job resources, job demands, and confidence in behavior management, based on data from 90 teachers in 35 classrooms at 18 CSRP Head Start sites

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CSRP's impact on low-income preschoolers' preacademic skills: Self-regulation as a mediating mechanism
Raver, C. Cybele, January/February 2011
Child Development, 82(1), 362-378

A study of the effects of a targeted intervention on low-income preschoolers' letter-naming, early math, and vocabulary gains, and an investigation of self-regulation as a mediator, based on data frm 602 Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP) participants in 35 Head Start-funded classrooms

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Cultural lessons: Comparing an African-centered with a more traditional Head Start program
Mayberry-Dunn, Theresa, 2003
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Illinois at Chicago

A study of the effects of an African-centered early education classroom on young children's cognitive and self-esteem development as well as its impact on parental involvement and satisfaction as compared with the effects of a Head Start preschool classroom

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Cultural relay in early childhood education: Methods of teaching school behavior to low-income children
Smith, Stephanie C., December, 2012
Urban Review, 44(5), 571-588

There is a distinct class difference in the way that children are taught school behavior. Teachers in affluent schools use more implicit teaching techniques while teachers of low-income children are more explicit in their teaching of behavior. This stems largely from the alignment of the home culture of middle class children to school behavior and the difference between the home culture of low-income children to school codes. However, middle class children learn behavior at home implicitly. This study examines the possibility of low-income children learning school behavior implicitly while at school. The researcher observed two Chicago Head Start centers-one using implicit instruction and one teaching behavior explicitly-over a period of 5 months. Observational data showed that the children that learned school behavior through implicit teaching techniques better internalized school behavior and, by extension, middle class codes. (author abstract)

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A descriptive study of the Head Start Health Component: Vol. II. Technical report
United States. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, 1996
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families.

Descriptive findings from a study of the Head Start Health Component, using child health records and standard data from the Head Start Program Information Report (PIR), plus observations and interviews with parents and staff, collected during the Spring of 1994 from a sample of 80 Head Start centers

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A descriptive study of the Head Start Health Component: Vol. I. Summary report
United States. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, 1996
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families.

A description of the ways in which the Health Component of the Head Start program address the medical, nutritional, and mental health needs of program participants

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Dosage effects on school readiness: Evidence from a randomized classroom-based intervention
Zhai, Fuhua, December 2010
Social Service Review, 84(4), 615-655

A study of dosage effects of a targeted intervention on low-income child behavior problems, emotional and behavioral self-regulation skills, and cognitive development, as well as a study of variation of dosage effects across school readiness measures and the individual components of the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP), based on data from 602 children and 90 teachers in 35 Head Start-funded classrooms

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Early Head Start and early intervention: A collaborative approach to serving infants and toddlers with disabilities in natural environments
Corso, Robert M., 2000
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

An examination of the collaborations between Early Head Start programs and early intervention service providers for children with disabilities outlined by Part C of the 1997 Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

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Early Start: A literacy-rich prekindergarten program for children academically at risk
McCormick, Christine E., 1992
Journal of Early Intervention, 16(1), 79-86

A description Early Start, a center-based prekindergarten literacy program for at-risk children in Illinois, and an assessment of the impact on its participants

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An evaluation of the effectiveness of the national Head Start Bureau early literacy mentor-coach initiative on teacher literacy practices and children's literacy learning outcomes
Onchwari, Grace, 2005
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Indiana State University, Terre Haute

An analysis of the effects of the Head Start Bureau's early literacy mentor-coach initiative on Head Start teachers' literacy strategies and practices and children's emergent literacy skills

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Expanding access to Early Head Start: State initiatives for infants & toddlers at risk
Colvard, Jamie, September, 2012
Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy.

In 2008, ZERO TO THREE and CLASP released Building on the Promise: State Initiatives to Expand Access to Early Head Start for Young Children and their Families, which outlined the diverse ways states expanded upon or enhanced EHS services for infants, toddlers, and their families. At that time, the researchers found 20 states with some efforts to expand or enhance EHS services at the state level. This report provides updated information on how states are supplementing EHS four years later. (author abstract)

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Family service delivery in Early Head Start: Perspectives of professionals in six states
Zhang, Chun, 2000
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

A discussion of the obstacles in delivering family service programs to families in Early Head Start programs, based on interviews with 43 Early Head Start directors and surveys of 206 staff members in six Midwestern states

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A first look at the Head Start CARES demonstration: Large-scale implementation of programs to improve children's social-emotional competence
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, December, 2013
(OPRE Report 2013-47). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

Head Start, which is the largest federally funded early childhood education program in the United States, aims to increase school readiness among low-income children from birth to age five years by boosting their cognitive, social, and emotional development. The Head Start CARES ("Classroom-based Approaches and Resources for Emotion and Social skill promotion") demonstration was designed to expand the current evidence base by evaluating enhancements to the standard curricula that have been used in Head Start classrooms. The demonstration included (1) selection of three different strategies, or program "enhancements," that in smaller-scale tests showed positive effects on children's social-emotional outcomes, such as reducing problem behaviors and promoting positive peer relationships; (2) implementation of these three enhancements in many different kinds of classrooms that operate within the regular Head Start system; and (3) the same professional development model, technical assistance, and program monitoring to support each of the three enhancements, in order to help ensure that they were implemented as designed while efforts were made to rapidly increase their scale, as Head Start CARES envisioned. This report, which focuses on how well the three enhancements and the related supports were implemented, is part of a larger Head Start CARES randomized control trial that is also examining the impact of the approaches on classrooms and the children in them. The Head Start CARES demonstration was conceived and sponsored by the Office of Head Start and the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation in the Administration for Children and Families in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The demonstration was conducted by MDRC, a nonprofit, nonpartisan education and social policy research organization, in collaboration with MEF Associates and several academic partners. (author abstract)

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Head Start: Better data and processes needed to monitor underenrollment
United States. General Accounting Office, 2003
(GAO-04-17). Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office.

A report addressing the extent to which Head Start grantees were underenrolled and identifying potential causes of underenrollment

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Head Start children's entry into public school: A report on the National Head Start/Public School Early Childhood Transition Demonstration Study
United States. Head Start Bureau, 2000
Washington, DC: U.S. Head Start Bureau.

An overview of the impact, on children, families, schools, and communities, of 31 local demonstration programs, conducted as part of the National Head Start/Public School Early Childhood Transition Demonstration Study, in 30 states and the Navajo Nation from the 1991-92 school year through the 1997-98 school year, and implementing major initiatives related to: parent involvement; educational enhancement; family social support services; and health and nutrition

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Head Start, prekindergarten, and academic school readiness: A comparison among regions in the United States
Zhai, Fuhua, May, 2013
Journal of Social Service Research, 39(3), 345-364

Child care programs (including Head Start, prekindergarten [pre-K], and other center-based care) can differ, with patterns of use based on their location. Yet little research has examined how Head Start and pre-K programs affect children's academic school readiness, including vocabulary and reading skills at school entry, in the South as compared to other regions. To examine this further, secondary data (n=2,803) collected in the Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study were examined. Overall findings suggest, regardless of region, that Head Start and pre-K participants had higher academic skills at school entry than did their counterparts. In addition, when Head Start was compared to other center-based care and pre-K was compared to other care arrangements, both had larger effects on improving academic skills in the South compared with in other regions. These findings imply that Head Start and pre-K programs should target children who otherwise would receive nonparental non-center-based care. Future research should focus on why the effects of Head Start and pre-K vary between the South and other regions. (author abstract)

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Head Start programs: Participant characteristics, services, and funding
United States. General Accounting Office. Health, Education, and Human Services Division, 1998
(GAO/HEHS-98-65). Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office.

A study of several factors of the Head Start program, including the number of participants, participants' characteristics, services provided, service delivery methods, federal and non-federal dollars received and spent, and other programs providing similar early childhood services

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Illinois: Child Care Collaboration Program
Center for Law and Social Policy, December, 2012
Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy.

An examination of an effort in Illinois to expand and enhance Early Head Start services, based on interviews with state program administrators

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Illinois: Prevention Initiative
Center for Law and Social Policy, December, 2012
Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy.

An examination of an effort in Illinois to expand and enhance Early Head Start services, based on interviews with state program administrators

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Impact findings from the Head Start CARES demonstration: National evaluation of three approaches to improving preschoolers' social and emotional competence
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, August, 2014
(OPRE Report 2014-44). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

The Head Start CARES (Classroom-based Approaches and Resources for Emotion and Social skill promotion) demonstration tests three distinct approaches to enhancing children's social-emotional development on a large scale within the Head Start system -- the largest federally funded early-childhood education program in the United States. Conceived and sponsored by the Office of Head Start and the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation in the Administration for Children and Families within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Head Start CARES demonstration was conducted by MDRC, a nonprofit, nonpartisan education and social policy research organization, in collaboration with MEF Associates and several academic partners. The three social-emotional approaches tested in Head Start CARES were called "enhancements" because they complemented and enriched classroom practices that already existed. The effects, or "impacts," of the enhancements were rigorously evaluated by randomly assigning approximately 100 Head Start centers to one of the three enhancements (the program group) or to a control group that continued with "business as usual." Therefore, estimated impacts should be interpreted as the effects of the enhancements over and above any effects of the existing Head Start program in these sites. As described in an earlier report on the Head Start CARES demonstration, a comprehensive professional development system for teachers -- including four to six training sessions, weekly coaching sessions in the classroom, a "real-time" management information system (MIS) to support monitoring, and technical assistance -- supported the scale-up of the enhancements around the country. The teacher training and coaching were generally implemented as intended, supporting satisfactory implementation (a rating of 3 on a scale of 1 to 5) of the social-emotional enhancements in Head Start classrooms and leading to the expected influences on teachers' practices, which are described below. Thus, it appears that the demonstration ensured a fair test of large-scale implementation of the three enhancements, providing a sound basis for evaluating their impact on children and classrooms in the Head Start system. This report presents the impacts of the three enhancements tested in the Head Start CARES demonstration. It focuses on outcomes in the spring of the preschool year for (1) teachers' practices; (2) the climate of the classroom; (3) children's behavior regulation, executive function skills, knowledge and understanding of emotions ("emotion knowledge"), and social problem-solving skills; and (4) children's learning behaviors and social behaviors. In addition to changing teachers' practices, two of the three enhancements had consistent positive impacts on a range of children's social-emotional outcomes, although not necessarily in ways that would be expected according to the theories of change that the CARES team developed. The Head Start CARES study thus demonstrates that preschool children's social-emotional outcomes can be improved when evidence-based approaches -- that is, approaches that have been shown to result in differences in children's social and emotional outcomes -- are implemented at scale with appropriate supports. The report also includes an exploratory set of findings, which have not been previously tested for these enhancements, about whether the enhancements might improve children's early academic skills in preschool and whether they have any sustained effects as preschool children make the transition to elementary school. (author abstract)

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Improving preschool classroom processes: Preliminary findings from a randomized trial implemented in Head Start settings
Raver, C. Cybele, Q1 2008
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 23(1), 10-26

A test of the impact of the mental health consultants provided to enhance Head Start teachers’ classroom management skills as part of and Chicago School Readiness Project (CRSP)

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More than teacher directed or child initiated: Preschool curriculum type, parent involvement, and children’s outcomes in the child-parent centers
Graue, M. Elizabeth, December, 2004
Education Policy Analysis Archives, 12(72), 1-38

An investigation of the links between early childhood curriculum designs and parent involvement and school readiness, early achievement, and future experiences, based on a study of preschool children attending Chicago Child-Parent Centers--early educational intervention services for children and families living in poverty

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Quasi-experimental estimates of the effects of a preschool intervention
Reynolds, Arthur J., August 1995
Evaluation Review, 19(4), 347-373

An analysis of program impact of student achievement test scores in 806 black Head Start children from kindergarten to grade six in Chicago

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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