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Current Filters: Author:Barnett, W. Steven [remove]; Full Text:no [remove]; Classification:Programs, Interventions & Curricula [remove];

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The case for public preschool
Gilliam, Walter S., 2011
In E.F. Zigler, W.S. Gilliam, & W.S. Barnett (Eds.), The pre-k debates: Current controversies and issues (pp. 116-120). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

A compilation of select arguments for the placement of public prekindergarten programs in public schools throughout the United States

Other


Classroom-based intervention as a way to support low-income preschoolers' emotional and behavioral development: Pressing challenges and potential opportunities
Raver, C. Cybele, 2011
In E.F. Zigler, W.S. Gilliam, & W.S. Barnett (Eds.), The pre-k debates: Current controversies and issues (pp. 104-110). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

An overview and summary of a Chicago School Readiness Project experiment on the effects of a teacher training program on both classroom quality and child behavior in Head Start classrooms

Other


The cognitive/academic emphasis versus the whole child approach: The 50-year debate
Bishop-Josef, Sandra J., 2011
In E.F. Zigler, W.S. Gilliam, & W.S. Barnett (Eds.), The pre-k debates: Current controversies and issues (pp. 83-88). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

An account of the alternating external pressures for a focus on either academic skills or broader child development goals throughout the history of Head Start

Other


Early childhood programs and success in school: The Abecedarian Study
Campbell, Frances A., 1998
In W. S. Barnett & S. Boocock (Eds.), Early care and education for children in poverty: Promises, programs, and long-term results (pp. 145-166). Albany, NY: State University of New York Press

An analysis of the academic outcomes of low income children participating in the Carolina Abecedarian Project, an intensive early intervention

Reports & Papers


The economic case for targeted preschool programs
Rolnick, Arthur, 2011
In E.F. Zigler, W.S. Gilliam, & W.S. Barnett (Eds.), The pre-k debates: Current controversies and issues (pp. 22-26). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

A compilation of economic arguments supporting a targeted approach to public early childhood education focusing on children in need instead of a universal availability approach

Other


The great balancing act: Optimizing core curricula through playful pedagogy
Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy, 2011
In E.F. Zigler, W.S. Gilliam, & W.S. Barnett (Eds.), The pre-k debates: Current controversies and issues (pp. 110-116). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

An argument for play-based learning in preschool environments

Other


The importance of kindergarten-entry academic skills
Duncan, Greg, 2011
In E.F. Zigler, W.S. Gilliam, & W.S. Barnett (Eds.), The pre-k debates: Current controversies and issues (pp. 89-93). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

A discussion of the differences in later school success of children who attend preschools that focus primarily on academics or on that include significant behavioral, emotional, and social skills components

Other


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Meta-analysis of the effects of early education interventions on cognitive and social development
Camilli, Gregory, March 2010
Teachers College Record, 112(3), 579-620

A study of the effects of early childhood interventions on children's cognitive development, social development, and school progress, based on a meta-analysis of 123 comparative quasi-experimental and randomized studies published between 1960 and 2000

Literature Review


New Jersey's Abbott prekindergarten program: A model for the nation
Frede, Ellen, 2011
In E.F. Zigler, W.S. Gilliam, & W.S. Barnett (Eds.), The pre-k debates: Current controversies and issues (pp. 191-196). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

An overview of trends in participation, measurements of academic outcomes, and efforts to improve quality in the public preschool programs of New Jersey's Abbott-designated school districts

Other


An overview of prekindergarten policy in the United States: Program governance, eligibility, standards and finance
Barnett, W. Steven, 2009
In R.C. Pianta & C. Howes (Eds.), The promise of pre-k (pp. 3-30). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

An overview state-funded Pre-K programs with particular attention to enrollment, funding, and program standards and policies

Reports & Papers


The pre-k debates: Current controversies and issues
Zigler, Edward F., 2011
Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

Commentaries on the choices faced by the United States in relation to the country's government-funded public prekindergarten systems, with sections on the issues of intended coverage, academics, quality, and teacher preparation

Other


Pre-Kindergarten in Eleven States: NCEDL's Multi-State Study of Pre-Kindergarten & Study of State-Wide Early Education Programs (SWEEP)
Early, Diane Marie, Fall 2013
Early, Diane , Margaret Burchinal, Oscar Barbarin , Donna Bryant, Florence Chang, Richard Clifford, Gisele Crawford, Wanda Weaver, Carollee Howes, Sharon Ritchie, Marcia Kraft-Sayre, Robert Pianta, and W. Steven Barnett. NCEDL's Multi-State Study of Pre-Kindergarten and study of State-Wide Early Education Programs (SWEEP). ICPSR34877-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2013-10-02. doi:10.3886/ICPSR34877.v1

The National Center for Early Development and Learning (NCEDL) combined the data of two major studies in order to understand variations among state-funded pre-kindergarten (pre-k) programs and in turn, how these variations relate to child outcomes at the end of pre-k and in kindergarten. The Multi-State Study of Pre-Kindergarten and the State-Wide Early Education Programs (SWEEP) Study provide detailed information on pre-kindergarten teachers, children, and classrooms in 11 states. By combining data from both studies, information is available from 721 classrooms and 2,982 pre-kindergarten children in these 11 states. Pre-kindergarten data collection for the Multi-State Study of Pre-Kindergarten took place during the 2001-2002 school year in six states: California, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, New York, and Ohio. These states were selected from among states that had committed significant resources to pre-k initiatives. States were selected to maximize diversity with regard to geography, program settings (public school or community setting), program intensity (full-day vs. part-day), and educational requirements for teachers. In each state, a stratified random sample of 40 centers/schools was selected from the list of all the school/centers or programs (both contractors and subcontractors) provided to the researchers by each state?s department of education. In total, 238 sites participated in the fall and two additional sites joined the study in the spring. Participating teachers helped the data collectors recruit children into the study by sending recruitment packets home with all children enrolled in the classroom. On the first day of data collection, the data collectors determined which of the children were eligible to participate. Eligible children were those who (1) would be old enough for kindergarten in the fall of 2002, (2) did not have an Individualized Education Plan, according to the teacher, and (3) spoke English or Spanish well enough to understand simple instructions, according to the teacher. Pre-kindergarten data collection for the SWEEP Study took place during the 2003-2004 school year in five states: Massachusetts, New Jersey, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. These states were selected to complement the states already in the Multi-State Study of Pre-K by including programs with significantly different funding models or modes of service delivery. In each of the five states, 100 randomly selected state-funded pre-kindergarten sites were recruited for participation in the study from a list of all sites provided by the state. In total, 465 sites participated in the fall. Two sites declined to continue participation in the spring, resulting in 463 sites participating in the spring. Participating teachers helped the data collectors recruit children into the study by sending recruitment packets home with all children enrolled in the classroom. On the first day of data collection, the data collectors determined which of the children were eligible to participate. Eligible children were those who (1) would be old enough for kindergarten in the fall of 2004, (2) did not have an Individualized Education Plan, according to the teacher, and (3) spoke English or Spanish well enough to understand simple instructions, according to the teacher. Demographic information collected across both studies includes race, teacher gender, child gender, family income, mother's education level, and teacher education level. The researchers also created a variable for both the child-level data and the class-level data which allows secondary users to subset cases according to either the Multi-State or SWEEP study.

Data Sets


Prekindergarten in Oklahoma
Takanishi, Ruby, 2011
In E.F. Zigler, W.S. Gilliam, & W.S. Barnett (Eds.), The pre-k debates: Current controversies and issues (pp. 188-191). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

An account of the development of the public prekindergarten system in the state of Oklahoma, and an overview of the research on public preschool's influence on children's academic outcomes in the city of Tulsa

Other


Preschool education for economically disadvantaged children: Effects on reading achievement and related outcomes
Barnett, W. Steven, 2001
In S. B. Neuman & D. K. Dickinson (Eds.), Handbook of early literacy research (Vol. 1, pp. 421-443). New York: Guilford Press

A review of research on preschool educationís influence on disadvantaged childrenís short and long-term reading achievement, cognitive abilities, grade repetition, and special education placement

Other


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Preschool: The most important grade
Barnett, W. Steven, 2003
Educational Leadership, 60(7), 54-57

An examination of the long-term benefits of early education and the options for integrating the existing patchwork of United States public and private pre-kindergarten programs into a uniform system

Other


Preschool programs should be coordinated in the public schools with supports from Head Start and child care
Gilliam, Walter S., 2011
In E.F. Zigler, W.S. Gilliam, & W.S. Barnett (Eds.), The pre-k debates: Current controversies and issues (pp. 120-126). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

A discussion of potential benefits of increased support for prekindergarten programs in public schools, as well as an acknowledgement of several practical obstacles to increased support for public prekindergarten

Other


The right policy at the right time: The Pew prekindergarten campaign
Watson, Sara D., 2011
In E.F. Zigler, W.S. Gilliam, & W.S. Barnett (Eds.), The pre-k debates: Current controversies and issues (pp. 9-20). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

An overview of the strategy of Pew Charititable Trust's state-level advocacy campaign to promote universal public prekindergarten

Other


The State of Preschool Yearbook: State-Funded Pre-K Program Data, 2011-2012 School Year
Barnett, W. Steven, Winter 2014
Barnett, W. Steven, and Megan E. Carolan. State of Preschool Yearbook: State-Funded Pre-K Program Data, 2011-2012 School Year. ICPSR34942-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research[distributor], 2014-01-30. doi:10.3886/ICPSR34942.v1

The State of Preschool Yearbook is annual review of access to, quality standards in, and resources devoted to state-funded preschool programs for 3- and 4-year-old children in the 54 programs in 40 states and the District of Columbia providing such programs, based on a survey of administrators of state-funded preschool programs. This edition of data covers the 2011-2012 school year, and accompanies the 2012 State of Preschool Yearbook.

Data Sets


What should come before preschool: Lessons from Early Head Start
Raikes, Helen, 2011
In E.F. Zigler, W.S. Gilliam, & W.S. Barnett (Eds.), The pre-k debates: Current controversies and issues (pp. 163-169). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

An overview and discussion of the effects of Early Head Start (EHS) on both the socioemotional and cognitive outcomes of children and the choices of their parents, based on the results of both the Educare and the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project studies

Other


Why the Child-Parent Center Education Program promotes life-course development
Reynolds, Arthur J., 2011
In E.F. Zigler, W.S. Gilliam, & W.S. Barnett (Eds.), The pre-k debates: Current controversies and issues (pp. 144-152). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes

An overview of the indicators used to evaluate the effectiveness of the Child-Parent Center Education Program and a discussion of the program's features

Other


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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