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Current Filters: Resource Type:Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects [remove]; Classification:Family, Friend, & Neighbor (Informal) [remove];

5 results found.
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Barriers to Child Care Subsidies
Shlay, Anne B., 2000
Temple University

A project consisting of three related studies. The first utilizes focus groups and a standardized survey with subsidy eligible families to examine subsidy use among low-income families. The second surveys low-income families to explore how child care preferences may be related to race and culture. The third uses observational measures to examine the quality of kith and kin care for families who do not use subsidies. This research provides policy-relevant information about developing subsidy policies that are sensitive to the contextual and cultural differences among low-income families.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Comparative Analysis of Subsidized and Non-Subsidized Relative Child Care in Kansas
Curry, Susan Willard, 2005
Kansas State University

An assessment of the quality of care in subsidized relative care settings, conducted for the purpose of informing policymakers regarding the efficacy of this investment. The objectives are two-fold: (1) to assess and compare quality of care observed in both subsidized and non-subsidized relative child care settings; and (2) to conduct a needs assessment of subsidized relative child care providers from which governmental agencies can facilitate support mechanisms or quality initiatives meeting the specific and unique needs of these providers. The study gathers quantitative data from sample pools of 30 subsidized and 30 non-subsidized relative child care providers from select Kansas counties, using the Child Care Assessment Tool for Relatives (CCAT-R) to measure the quality in relative care environments. Complementary qualitative data is gathered from focus group interviews of subsidized and non-subsidized child care providers.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Informal Caregiving Among the White Mountain Apache and its Impact on Child Health and Well Being
Sparks, Shannon Michelle Anjeanette, 2000
University of Arizona

An ethnographic study of informal kith and kin care among the White Mountain Apaches, and the effects of child care practices on child health, with an exploration of the implications of welfare reform for parent employment and child care. The project has three basic components: (1) patterns of caregiving; (2) the practice of alternative caregiving and health related behaviors; and (3) community attitudes.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


A Study of Informal Child Care
Brumleve, Linda, 2001
Illinois, Department of Human Services

A multi-method, descriptive study of informal care, analyzing data (including State subsidy data) to assess utilization of subsidized informal care statewide. Data are gathered from focus groups and interviews conducted in three diverse Illinois communities to gain the perspectives of parents, providers, and staff of Child Care Resource and Referral agencies, including comprehensive interviews with 300 parents and 300 informal providers. The study develops strategies for providing services and supports to informal caregivers.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Supporting Quality in Home-Based Care
Paulsell, Diane, 2007
Mathematica Policy Research

The purpose of this project is to provide useful information for policymakers and administrators who aim to develop or fund initiatives for home-based caregivers and researchers seeking to build the knowledge base about home-based care. The project had three primary objectives: (1) to systematically gather information from existing research on home-based child care and on initiatives that aim to support these caregivers; (2) to synthesize the available evidence on home-based care; and (3) to propose next steps for designing and evaluating initiatives that aim to improve the quality of care in these settings

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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