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Current Filters: State:ARIZONA [remove]; Classification:Family, Friend, & Neighbor (Informal) [remove];

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Arizona Kith and Kin Project: The invisible child care provider: Findings from Arizona's Kith and Kin Project 2010
Shivers, Eva Marie,
Phoenix, AZ: Indigo Cultural Center, Institute for Child Development Research and Social Change.

An evaluation of the Arizona Kith and Kin Project, a 14-week support group training series for family, friend, and neighbor child care providers in Arizona, that examines provider characteristics and changes in provider child care quality and knowledge, based on provider surveys and on pre- and post-program observations and assessments

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Assessing quality in family, friend and neighbor care: The Child Care Assessment Tool for Relatives
Porter, Toni, 2006
New York: Bank Street College of Education, Institute for a Child Care Continuum. (No longer accessible as of October 10, 2012).

A paper describing the Child Care Assessment Tool for Relatives, an instrument designed to measure quality of child care provided by relatives, in terms of its development and the results of a field test where it was used with low income relative caregivers

Reports & Papers


Children, caregiving, culture, and community: Understanding the place and importance of kith and kin care in the White Mountain Apache community
Sparks, Shannon Michelle Anjeanette, 2007
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Arizona, Tucson

An ethnographic study of the values and circumstances influencing the child care decisions of members of the White Mountain Apache community, with particular attention to both cultural differences in perceptions of quality care and the trends related to the use of family, friend, and neighbor care, based on interviews, observations, and discussions with several dozen parents and care providers

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A compilation of initiatives to support home-based child care
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, March 31, 2010
Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

A compilation of profiles of 96 initiatives that target and support home-based child care

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The Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot Project: How Early Head Start programs are reaching out to kith and kin caregivers: Final interim report
Paulsell, Diane, 2006
Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research.

A preliminary descriptive evaluation of the Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot Project, analyzing participant characteristics and program design as they affect the extension of home visitation services to relatives and non-relatives caring for infants and toddlers enrolled in home-based Early Head Start programs

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Exploring the training needs of family, friend and neighbor child care providers
Shivers, Eva Marie, 2008
Phoenix, AZ: Indigo Cultural Center, Institute for Child Development Research and Social Change. (No longer accessible as of January 18, 2013).

A study of the training concerns and needs of family, friend, and neighbor child care providers, based on focus groups with 30 providers in Phoenix, Arizona; Los Angeles; and the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma

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Supporting family, friend and neighbor caregivers: Findings from a survey of state policies
Porter, Toni, 2005
New York: Bank Street College of Education, Institute for a Child Care Continuum. (No longer accessible as of August 16, 2012)

An examination of state regulatory policies for kith and kin child care providers receiving government subsidies

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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