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Current Filters: New in last 90 days [remove]; Classification:Family, Friend, & Neighbor (Informal) [remove];

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Developing initiatives for home-based child care: Current research and future directions
Porter, Toni, May, 2011
Zero to Three, 31(5), 4-13

Home-based child care accounts for a significant share of the child care supply in the United States, especially for infants and toddlers. A synthesis of the home-based care research literature and information about recent home-based care quality initiatives points to a critical need for more systematic efforts to develop and test quality initiatives for this type of child care. This article summarizes key findings on the prevalence and quality of home-based child care, caregiver characteristics, and quality initiatives and then makes recommendations for future directions. (author abstract)

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Family proximity, childcare, and women's labor force attachment
Compton, Janice, January, 2014
Journal of Urban Economics, 79(), 72-90

We show that close geographical proximity to mothers or mothers-in-law has a substantial positive effect on the labor supply of married women with young children. We argue that the mechanism through which proximity increases labor supply is the availability of childcare. We interpret availability broadly enough to include not only regular scheduled childcare during work hours but also an insurance aspect of proximity (e.g., a mother or mother-in-law who can to provide irregular or unanticipated childcare). Using two large datasets, the National Survey of Families and Households and the public use files of the U.S. Census, we find that the predicted probability of employment and labor force participation is 4-10 percentage points higher for married women with young children living in close proximity to their mothers or their mothers-in-law compared with those living further away. (author abstract)

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The Minnesota family, friend and neighbor grant program
Susman-Stillman, Amy R., May, 2011
Zero to Three, 31(5), 42-50

In 1997, Minnesota became the first state in the nation to pass legislation establishing an education and support program for family, friend, and neighbor (FFN) care providers. This article describes the Minnesota Family, Friend and Neighbor Grant Program and findings from an evaluation of the programs and a curriculum scan of materials used in the programs. The authors discuss lessons about program implementation and offer recommendations for continued program development. The authors also describe caregiver-reported activities as a result of program participation and share experiences of a unique and prominent group of FFN caregivers-grandmothers. (author abstract)

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Working with family, friend, and neighbor caregivers: Lessons from four diverse communities
Powell, Douglas R., May, 2011
Zero to Three, 31(5), 51-56

This project sought to identify and connect with, then survey the professional development needs of a sample of family, friend, and neighbor caregivers (FFN) serving four selected minority/disadvantaged communities in Minnesota. A focus group of caregivers was drawn from each of 1) an inner city neighborhood, 2) an urban Somali neighborhood, 3) a suburban Somali community, and 4) a Native American reservation. Recruitment efforts revealed that most FFN providers willing to participate had an existing connection to a formal support system for their caregiver role. Agency lists of unlicensed providers and the use of print-based community outreach materials did not always provide a path to caregivers, while word-of-mouth was relatively successful. Data were collected in the form of questionnaires, focus groups, home visits, and personal interactions with the caregivers. Issues regarding food, culture, and language were discovered to be of concern to the caregivers. The project's focus on infant and toddler care and management of infant temperaments was of particular interest to caregivers with experience caring for older children, but this finding was not universal. The authors found no single support need common to each group of caregivers (e.g. some providers were open to licensure training, while others had no interest in formalizing their role).

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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