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Current Filters: Pub Year:2011 [remove]; Classification:Family, Friend, & Neighbor (Informal) [remove];

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A comparative analysis of subsidized and non-subsidized relative child care homes in Kansas
Curry, Susan Willard, 2011
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Kansas State University, Manhattan

A comparison of the quality of care provided by family, friend, and neighbor caregivers in Kansas who do or do not receive child care subsidies, based on observations of and interviews with 22 caregivers and on focus groups with 5 caregivers

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Developing initiatives for home-based child care: Current research and future directions
Porter, Toni, May, 2011
Zero to Three, 31(5), 4-13

Home-based child care accounts for a significant share of the child care supply in the United States, especially for infants and toddlers. A synthesis of the home-based care research literature and information about recent home-based care quality initiatives points to a critical need for more systematic efforts to develop and test quality initiatives for this type of child care. This article summarizes key findings on the prevalence and quality of home-based child care, caregiver characteristics, and quality initiatives and then makes recommendations for future directions. (author abstract)

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Do downward private transfers enhance maternal labor supply?: Evidence from around Europe
Dimova, Ralitza, July, 2011
Journal of Population Economics, 24(3), 911-933

A study of the relationships between maternal labor force participation and both family child care and monetary transfers provided by grandparents, based on data from 2,317 mother-grandparent pairs from 10 European countries

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Family labor participation and child care decisions: The role of grannies
Zamarro, Gema, January, 2011
(WR-833). Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation.

A study of child care provided by grandmothers in 10 European countries and its relationship to labor force participation of grandmothers and their children, based on an analysis of data from 1,689 grandmothers between 50 and 65 years old with grandchildren under age 13 from the longitudinal, cross-national Survey of Health, Aging, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE)

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Family proximity, childcare, and women's labor force attachment
Compton, Janice, December, 2011
(NBER Working Paper No. 17678). Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research.

We show that close geographical proximity to mothers or mothers-in-law has a substantial positive effect on the labor supply of married women with young children. We argue that the mechanism through which proximity increases labor supply is the availability of childcare. We interpret availability broadly enough to include not only regular scheduled childcare during work hours but also an insurance aspect of proximity (e.g., a mother or mother-in-law who can provide irregular or unanticipated childcare). Using two large datasets, the National Survey of Families and Households and the public use files of the U.S. Census, we find that the predicted probability of employment and labor force participation is 4-10 percentage points higher for married women with young children living in close proximity to their mothers or their mothers-in-law compared with those living further away. (author abstract)

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Grandparent involvement and parenting stress among nonmarried mothers of young children
Greenfield, Emily A., March, 2011
Social Service Review, 85(1), 135-157

An investigation of the relationships between changes in parental stress and both grandparent residence and involvement in care, and an examination of differences by maternal race, based on longitudinal data, collected at birth, age 1, and age 3, from over 1,000 non-married urban parents between 1998 and 2000

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Grandparents providing child care: Briefing paper
Statham, June, November, 2011
London: Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre.

A review of research on grandparent child care, with a focus on the United Kingdom, including type and hours of grandparent child care provided and its relationship to child and adult outcomes

Literature Review


Informal child care: Choice or chance?: A literature review
Rutter, Jill, 2011
London: Daycare Trust.

A review of research on informal child care in the United Kingdom, including patterns of and factors that influence use, parent and child views of informal child care, parental informal child care decisionmaking, characteristics of providers, and outcomes of informal child care

Literature Review


Listening to grandparents
Rutter, Jill, 2011
(Informal Child Care Research Paper One). London: Daycare Trust.

A study of child care provided by grandparents in the United Kingdom, including patterns of grandparent care, grandparent views of caregiving, and families' child care decisionmaking, based on a research review, an analysis of secondary data, a survey of parents, and surveys and interviews with grandparent child care providers

Reports & Papers


Listening to grandparents [Executive summary]
Rutter, Jill, 2011
(Informal Child Care Research Paper One). London: Daycare Trust.

A summary of a study of child care provided by grandparents in the United Kingdom, including patterns of grandparent care, grandparent views of caregiving, and families' child care decisionmaking, based on a research review, an analysis of secondary data, a survey of parents, and surveys and interviews with grandparent child care providers

Executive Summary


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The Minnesota family, friend and neighbor grant program
Susman-Stillman, Amy R., May, 2011
Zero to Three, 31(5), 42-50

In 1997, Minnesota became the first state in the nation to pass legislation establishing an education and support program for family, friend, and neighbor (FFN) care providers. This article describes the Minnesota Family, Friend and Neighbor Grant Program and findings from an evaluation of the programs and a curriculum scan of materials used in the programs. The authors discuss lessons about program implementation and offer recommendations for continued program development. The authors also describe caregiver-reported activities as a result of program participation and share experiences of a unique and prominent group of FFN caregivers-grandmothers. (author abstract)

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National Childminding Association annual membership survey report
Lake Market Research, 2011
Bromley, United Kingdom: National Childminding Association.

A study of English and Welsh nannies and family child care providers, including their business practices, pay and working conditions, caring for children with special needs, and qualifications and training, based on interviews with 164 nannies and 1,000 randomly selected members of a national association of nannies and family child care providers

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National Childminding Association annual membership survey report [Executive summary]
Lake Market Research, 2011
Bromley, United Kingdom: National Childminding Association.

A summary of a study of English and Welsh nannies and family child care providers, including their business practices, pay and working conditions, caring for children with special needs, and qualifications and training, based on interviews with 164 nannies and 1,000 randomly selected members of a national association of nannies and family child care providers

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The provision of informal childcare by European grandparents: Constraints versus selective preferences
Ghysels, Joris, July, 2011
(CSB Working Paper No. 11/08). Antwerp, Belgium: Centrum voor Sociaal Beleid Herman Deleeck (Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy).

This paper extends existing theories on parental time investment in children to a three generational setting and discusses identifiable restrictions of alternative explanations for grandparental help with childcare. It shows on data of 10 European countries (taken from the 2004 SHAREsurvey) that earlier empirical work may have mistakenly identified gender variation as an indication of non-altruistic behavior. In fact, grandparental choices can be explained as a response to varying constraints, for instance with regards to the disproportional care needs of lone parents or employed children experiencing rationing in the market for formal care services. (author abstract)

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Quality in family, friend, and neighbor child care settings
Susman-Stillman, Amy R., May 2011
New York: Child Care & Early Education Research Connections

A review of research on issues related to the quality of family, friend, and neighbor (FFN) child care, including structural and process quality in FFN child care settings, parental perceptions of FFN care, and the relationship between FFN care and child outcomes

Literature Review


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Welfare policies and adolescents: Exploring the roles of sibling care, maternal work schedules, and economic resources
Hsueh, JoAnn, December, 2011
American Journal of Community Psychology, 48(3-4), 322-340

A study of the relationship between adolescent school performance and participation and maternal employment and changes in families' reliance on sibling care due to welfare reform, based on data from three longitudinal experimental evaluations of: (1) the Jobs First Evaluation conducted in New Haven and Manchester, Connecticut; (2) the Family Transition Program conducted in Escambia County, Florida; and (3) the statewide Indiana Welfare Reform Program

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Working with family, friend, and neighbor caregivers: Lessons from four diverse communities
Powell, Douglas R., May, 2011
Zero to Three, 31(5), 51-56

This project sought to identify and connect with, then survey the professional development needs of a sample of family, friend, and neighbor caregivers (FFN) serving four selected minority/disadvantaged communities in Minnesota. A focus group of caregivers was drawn from each of 1) an inner city neighborhood, 2) an urban Somali neighborhood, 3) a suburban Somali community, and 4) a Native American reservation. Recruitment efforts revealed that most FFN providers willing to participate had an existing connection to a formal support system for their caregiver role. Agency lists of unlicensed providers and the use of print-based community outreach materials did not always provide a path to caregivers, while word-of-mouth was relatively successful. Data were collected in the form of questionnaires, focus groups, home visits, and personal interactions with the caregivers. Issues regarding food, culture, and language were discovered to be of concern to the caregivers. The project's focus on infant and toddler care and management of infant temperaments was of particular interest to caregivers with experience caring for older children, but this finding was not universal. The authors found no single support need common to each group of caregivers (e.g. some providers were open to licensure training, while others had no interest in formalizing their role).

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