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Current Filters: Pub Year:1999 [remove]; Classification:Family, Friend, & Neighbor (Informal) [remove];

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Caring for Connecticut's children: Perspectives on informal, subsidized child care
Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 1999
Farmington: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut.

A report presenting findings from a study on informal child care with a focus on the use of this care by low income families in Connecticut

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Caring for Connecticut's children: Perspectives on informal, subsidized child care [Executive summary]
Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 1999
Farmington: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut.

A summary of findings from a study regarding low income families' use of informal child care

Executive Summary


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The ecological context of in-home nonrelative child care
Monroe, Lisa, 1999
Early Child Development and Care, 157(1), 7-26

An examination of in-home nonrelative child caregivers, their work environment, quality of services provided and their employers,

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Grandmothers' involvement in grandchildren's care: Attitudes, feelings, and emotions
Gattai, Flavia B., 1999
Family Relations, 48(1), 35-42

A study conducted in Italy of the variety of psychological and relational aspects of mothers, grandmothers, and young children from the point of view of the grandmother, including their analysis of the meaning they assigned to grandmothering and the individual definitions they assigned to their role as grandmothers

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Grandmothers providing care for grandchildren: Consequences of various levels of caregiving
Bowers, Bonita, 1999
Family Relations, 48(3), 303-311

An examination of the differences between grandmothers who provide various levels of caregiving responsibilities for their grandchildren

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Nonparental child care
Lamb, Michael E., 1999
In Parenting and child development in ''nontraditional'' families (pp. 39-55). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

A summary of the association of non-parental child care on childrenís development

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Some economic complexities of child care provided by grandmothers
Presser, Harriet B., 1999
Journal of Marriage and the Family, 51(3), 581-591

A study of the economic complexities of grandmothers as child care providers

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Support for informal child care providers
Emanoil, Pamela, Fall 1999
Human Ecology, 27(4), 14-16

A discussion of the need for resources and support mechanisms for informal child care providers

Other


The use of grandparents as child care providers
Guzman, Lina, 1999
(NSFH Working Paper No. 84). Madison: University of Wisconsin--Madison, Center for Demography and Ecology.

An examination of the role of maternal preferences and inter-generational ties in a parentís decision to use grandparents for child care, based on data from the first and second waves of The National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH)

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Using kin for child care: Embedment in the socioeconomic networks of extended families
Uttal, Lynet, 1999
Journal of Marriage and the Family, 61(4), 845-857

A study of the factors promoting the greater propensity for African American and Mexican American mothersí to use child care arrangements with relatives than their Anglo American counterparts, with analysis pointing to a greater sensitivity by minority extended families to the economic needs of their relatives with young children

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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