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Current Filters: State:NORTH CAROLINA [remove]; Classification:Economic & Societal Impact [remove];

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Adult outcomes as a function of an early childhood educational program: An Abecedarian Project follow-up
Campbell, Frances A., July, 2012
Developmental Psychology, 48(4), 1033-1043

A longitudinal study of the effect of an early educational intervention on economic, socioemotional, and educational outcomes at age 30, based on data collected from 101 of the original low-income participants in the Abecedarian Project experiment in North Carolina

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Child care in the southern states: Expanding access to affordable care for low-income families and fostering economic development
Stoney, Louise, 2000
Columbia, SC: Southern Institute on Children and Families.

An overview of the financial status of child care in southern United States, which argues that, by allowing both parents to work, child care has contributed to the economic expansion of the nation

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Early childhood education: Young adult outcomes from the Abecedarian Project
Campbell, Frances A., 2002
Applied Developmental Science, 6(1), 42-57

An article presenting the effects at age 21 of the Abecedarian Project, an early intervention for at-risk children, on cognitive, educational, and social outcomes

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Early childhood investments substantially boost adult health
Campbell, Frances A., 28 March, 2014
Science, 343(6178), 1478-1485

High-quality early childhood programs have been shown to have substantial benefits in reducing crime, raising earnings, and promoting education. Much less is known about their benefits for adult health. We report on the long-term health effects of one of the oldest and most heavily cited early childhood interventions with long-term follow-up evaluated by the method of randomization: the Carolina Abecedarian Project (ABC). Using recently collected biomedical data, we find that disadvantaged children randomly assigned to treatment have significantly lower prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in their mid-30s. The evidence is especially strong for males. The mean systolic blood pressure among the control males is 143 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg), whereas it is only 126 mm Hg among the treated. One in four males in the control group is affected by metabolic syndrome, whereas none in the treatment group are affected. To reach these conclusions, we address several statistical challenges. We use exact permutation tests to account for small sample sizes and conduct a parallel bootstrap confidence interval analysis to confirm the permutation analysis. We adjust inference to account for the multiple hypotheses tested and for nonrandom attrition. Our evidence shows the potential of early life interventions for preventing disease and promoting health. (author abstract)

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The economic impact of the child care industry in North Carolina
Traill, Saskia, 2004
Oakland, CA: National Economic Development and Law Center.

An analysis of the impact of the child care industry on North Carolina's economy to improve efficiency of long term investments in child care industry and increase state's economic competitiveness

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The importance of child care in economic development: A comparative analysis of regional economic linkage
Warner, Mildred, 2006
Economic Development Quarterly, 20(1), 97-103

An analysis of the regional economic impact of the child care sector, as compared to the agriculture, manufacturing, and services sectors, using state-level input-output models

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A three-sector model of day care center services
Kushman, John E., 1979
Journal of Human Resources, 14(4), 543-562

An analysis of the political pressures of increased subsidization of child care and tax and welfare reform with market trends in three types of child care centers in North Carolina

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Universal child care, maternal employment, and children's long-run outcomes: Evidence from the U.S. Lanham Act of 1940
Herbst, Chris M., December, 2013
(Discussion Paper No. 7846). Bonn, Germany: Institute for the Study of Labor.

This paper provides a comprehensive analysis of the Lanham Act of 1940, a heavily subsidized and universal child care program that was administered throughout the U.S. during World War II. I begin by estimating the impact of the Lanham Act on maternal employment using 1940 and 1950 Census data in a difference-in-difference-in-differences framework. The evidence suggests that mothers' paid work increased substantially following the introduction of the child care program. I then study the implications of the Lanham Act for children's long-run outcomes related to educational attainment, family formation, and labor market participation. Using Census data from 1970 to 1990, I assess well-being in a lifecycle framework by tracking cohorts of treated individuals throughout their prime working years. Results from difference-in-differences models suggest that the Lanham Act had strong and persistent positive effects on well-being, equivalent to a 0.36 standard deviation increase in a summary index of adult outcomes. In addition, a supplementary analysis of distributional effects shows that the benefits of the Lanham Act accrued largely to the most economically disadvantaged adults. Together, these findings shed light on the design of contemporary child care systems that balance the twin goals of increasing parental employment and enhancing child well-being. (author abstract)

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