Browse the Collection

RC Produced by Research Connections

* Peer Reviewed Journal

Current Filters: State:MICHIGAN [remove]; Classification:Economic & Societal Impact [remove];

23 results found.
[1]  
Select Citation
Result Resource Type

Analyzing social experiments as implemented: A reexamination of the evidence from the HighScope Perry Preschool Program
Heckman, James J., July, 2010
(Discussion Paper No. 5065). Bonn, Germany: Institute for the Study of Labor.

A reconceptualized cost-benefit and return-on-investment analysis of the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program, based on data from the original program participants and matched data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Analyzing social experiments as implemented: A reexamination of the evidence from the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program
Heckman, James J., July, 2010
(Working Paper No. 16238). Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research.

A reconceptualized cost-benefit and return-on-investment analysis of the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program, based on data from the original program participants and matched data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Analyzing social experiments as implemented: A reexamination of evidence from the HighScope Perry Preschool Program
Heckman, James J., 22 July, 2010
Dublin, Republic of Ireland: University College, Dublin, Geary Institute.

A reconceptualized cost-benefit and return-on-investment analysis of the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program, based on data from the original program participants and matched data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Analyzing social experiments as implemented: A reexamination of the evidence from the High Scope Perry Preschool Program
Heckman, James J., July, 2010
Quantitative Economics, 1(1), 1-46

A reanalysis of data from the Perry Preschool Project, a longitudinal experimental study of the impact of a preschool education and home visitation intervention on over 715 measured outcome variables of disadvantaged children in preschool, based on data from participants from age 3 through age 40

Reports & Papers


*

Benefit-cost analysis of the Perry Preschool Program and its policy implications
Barnett, W. Steven, 1985
Educational Evaluation & Policy Analysis, 7(4), 333-342

A benefit-cost analysis of the Perry Preschool project, a discussion of its net value, and implications for future policy decisions

Reports & Papers


Benefits, costs, and explanation of the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program
Schweinhart, Lawrence J., 2003
Paper presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Tampa, Florida.

A paper on the long-term effects and cost benefits of the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program

Reports & Papers


Cost savings analysis of school readiness in Michigan
Chase, Richard A., November, 2009
Lansing, MI: Early Childhood Investment Corporation.

An analysis of the costs to Michigan for the provision of school readiness and early education programs, and an estimation of the future benefits generated from the state's early childhood investments

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Cost savings of school readiness per additional at-risk child in Detroit and Michigan
Chase, Richard A., December, 2011
Southfield, MI: Max M. & Marjorie S. Fisher Foundation.

An examination of cost savings to Detroit and Michigan of preparing an at risk child for school through early childhood education, based on school graduation and expenditure data, poverty and crime rates, and other data for Detroit and Michigan, and on estimates of the measured influence of early childhood education programs from research literature

Reports & Papers


Economic development benefits of preschool expansion in Kalamazoo County
Bartik, Timothy J., July 24, 2008
(Upjohn Institute Staff Working Paper No. 09-147). Kalamazoo, MI: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

An analysis modeling the county job and earnings creation effects relative to costs of a hypothetical large-scale high-quality preschool expansion in Kalamazoo County, Michigan

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

The High/Scope Perry Preschool Program: Cost-benefit analysis using data from the age-40 followup
Belfield, Clive R., 2006
Journal of Human Resources, 41(1), 162-190

A cost-benefit analysis of long-term effects of preschool attendance, comparing program cost with treatment impact on the educational attainment, income, criminal activity, and welfare receipt of participants in the age 40 follow-up study of the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program

Reports & Papers


*

The importance of child care in economic development: A comparative analysis of regional economic linkage
Warner, Mildred, 2006
Economic Development Quarterly, 20(1), 97-103

An analysis of the regional economic impact of the child care sector, as compared to the agriculture, manufacturing, and services sectors, using state-level input-output models

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Lifetime effects: The High/Scope Perry Preschool Study through age 40
Schweinhart, Lawrence J., 2005
(Monographs of the High/Scope Educational Research Foundation No. 14). Ypsilanti, MI: High/Scope Press

An examination of the lives of 123 African Americans born in poverty and at high risk of failing in school who were at ages 3 and 4, from 19621967, randomly divided into a program group that received a high quality preschool program based on High Scope's participatory learning approach and a comparison group who received no preschool program

Reports & Papers


*

Long-term follow-up of a preschool experiment
Schweinhart, Lawrence J., December, 2013
Journal of Experimental Criminology, 9(4), 389-409

This study was designed to provide experimental evidence of the effects of a preschool program on young children living in poverty. It began as a program evaluation but now, half a century later, serves as a test of the long-term effects and return on investment of high-quality preschool education for young children living in poverty. Methods This study was conducted in the U.S., beginning in the 1960s, and has generated data on study participants from birth through 40, with new data now being collected at age 50. The study used random assignment procedures to assign 123 children to a preschool program and a control group who receive no preschool program. Results Program participants surpassed non-participants in intellectual performance at school entry, school achievement throughout schooling, commitment to schooling, high school graduation rate, adult employment rate and earnings, reduced childhood antisocial behavior, and reduced adult crime and incarceration. The program's return on investment was at least seven times as great as its operating cost. Conclusions While these powerful results have been found not only in this study but in several similar studies, they have not been found in studies of larger preschool programs, such as the Head Start Impact Study. This discrepancy suggests that differences between the two types of programs account for the better results found in studies such as this one. Among these differences are highly qualified teachers, a valid child development curriculum, extensive engagement of parents, and regular assessment of program implementation and children's development (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

A new cost-benefit and rate of return analysis for the Perry Preschool Program: A summary
Heckman, James J., July 2010
(NBER Working Paper Series No. 16180). Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research.

An overview of a reconceptualized cost-benefit and return-on-investment analysis of the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program, based on data from the original program participants and matched data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1929) and the March 2002 Current Population Survey

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

The rate of return to the HighScope Perry Preschool Program
Heckman, James J., February 2010
Journal of Public Economics, 94(1-2), 114-128

An estimation of the cost-benefit ratio and rate of return for the High/Scope Perry Preschool program, with a focus on the economic benefits and impact on crime

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

The rate of return to the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program
Heckman, James J., November 2009
(NBER Working Paper Series No. 15471). Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research.

An estimation of the cost-benefit ratio and rate of return for the High/Scope Perry Preschool program, with a focus on the economic benefits and impact on crime

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

The rate of return to the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program
Heckman, James J., October 2009
(Discussion Paper No. 4533). Bonn, Germany: Institute for the Study of Labor.

An estimation of the cost-benefit ratio and rate of return for the High/Scope Perry Preschool program, with a focus on the economic benefits and impact on crime

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Strengthening Michigan businesses through investments in early care and education: How investments in early learning increase sales from local businesses, create jobs and grow the economy
Schaefer, Stephanie A., 2011
Washington, DC: America's Edge.

An analysis of the economic impacts of Michigan investments in early care and education programs

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Understanding the mechanisms through which an influential early childhood program boosted adult outcomes
Heckman, James J., November, 2012
(NBER Working Paper No. 18581). Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research.

A study of the effects of Perry Preschool, a program for at risk children in Ypsilanti, Michigan, on children's cognitive and personality skills, and an examination of the relationships of these skills, and of the program's contribution to these skills, to later academic, labor market, health, and crime outcomes, based on longitudinal data through age 40 for 123 randomly-assigned participants

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Understanding the mechanisms through which an influential early childhood program boosted adult outcomes
Heckman, James J., November, 2012
(Discussion Paper No. 7040). Bonn, Germany: Institute for the Study of Labor.

A study of the effects of Perry Preschool, a program for at risk children in Ypsilanti, Michigan, on children's cognitive and personality skills, and an examination of the relationships of these skills, and of the program's contribution to these skills, to later academic, labor market, health, and crime outcomes, based on longitudinal data through age 40 for 123 randomly-assigned participants

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Understanding the mechanisms through which an influential early childhood program boosted adult outcomes
Heckman, James J., October, 2013
The American Economic Review, 103(6), 2052-2086

A growing literature establishes that high quality early childhood interventions targeted toward disadvantaged children have substantial impacts on later life outcomes. Little is known about the mechanisms producing these impacts. This paper uses longitudinal data on cognitive and personality skills from an experimental evaluation of the influential Perry Preschool program to analyze the channels through which the program boosted both male and female participant outcomes. Experimentally induced changes in personality skills explain a sizable portion of adult treatment effects. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Universal child care, maternal employment, and children's long-run outcomes: Evidence from the U.S. Lanham Act of 1940
Herbst, Chris M., December, 2013
(Discussion Paper No. 7846). Bonn, Germany: Institute for the Study of Labor.

This paper provides a comprehensive analysis of the Lanham Act of 1940, a heavily subsidized and universal child care program that was administered throughout the U.S. during World War II. I begin by estimating the impact of the Lanham Act on maternal employment using 1940 and 1950 Census data in a difference-in-difference-in-differences framework. The evidence suggests that mothers' paid work increased substantially following the introduction of the child care program. I then study the implications of the Lanham Act for children's long-run outcomes related to educational attainment, family formation, and labor market participation. Using Census data from 1970 to 1990, I assess well-being in a lifecycle framework by tracking cohorts of treated individuals throughout their prime working years. Results from difference-in-differences models suggest that the Lanham Act had strong and persistent positive effects on well-being, equivalent to a 0.36 standard deviation increase in a summary index of adult outcomes. In addition, a supplementary analysis of distributional effects shows that the benefits of the Lanham Act accrued largely to the most economically disadvantaged adults. Together, these findings shed light on the design of contemporary child care systems that balance the twin goals of increasing parental employment and enhancing child well-being. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Updating the economic impacts of the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program
Nores, Milagros, 2005
Educational Evaluation & Policy Analysis, 27(3), 245-261

A determination of the long-term costs and benefits of the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program on participants, based on data from a follow-up survey of 119 participants at age 40

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Select Citation
[1]  

Search Feedback


 



Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Google Translate