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Current Filters: State:FLORIDA [remove]; Classification:Economic & Societal Impact [remove];

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2003: The economic impact of child care in Florida
Florida Children's Forum, 2003
Tallahassee, FL: Florida Children's Forum.

A report describing the effects of the child care industry on Florida's state economy, highlighting the direct and indirect effects on revenue and jobs

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Child care in the southern states: Expanding access to affordable care for low-income families and fostering economic development
Stoney, Louise, 2000
Columbia, SC: Southern Institute on Children and Families.

An overview of the financial status of child care in southern United States, which argues that, by allowing both parents to work, child care has contributed to the economic expansion of the nation

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Economic volatility and expulsion in U.S. child care settings: A multi-state survey
Southward, Linda H., 2006
Mississippi State: Mississippi State University, Social Science Research Center.

Studies of the economic vulnerability of American child care centers and expulsion of children for parental nonpayment or changes in voucher status, based on a random sample of 807 child care centers in five states

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The importance of child care in economic development: A comparative analysis of regional economic linkage
Warner, Mildred, 2006
Economic Development Quarterly, 20(1), 97-103

An analysis of the regional economic impact of the child care sector, as compared to the agriculture, manufacturing, and services sectors, using state-level input-output models

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Power to the people: The effectiveness of ballot measures in advancing early care and education
Chalfie, Deborah, 2005
Washington, DC: National Women's Law Center.

An analysis of the effectiveness of state and local ballot campaigns to improve the quality, availability, and affordability of child care and early education, based on legal research, public records, and interviews

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Universal child care, maternal employment, and children's long-run outcomes: Evidence from the U.S. Lanham Act of 1940
Herbst, Chris M., December, 2013
(Discussion Paper No. 7846). Bonn, Germany: Institute for the Study of Labor.

This paper provides a comprehensive analysis of the Lanham Act of 1940, a heavily subsidized and universal child care program that was administered throughout the U.S. during World War II. I begin by estimating the impact of the Lanham Act on maternal employment using 1940 and 1950 Census data in a difference-in-difference-in-differences framework. The evidence suggests that mothers' paid work increased substantially following the introduction of the child care program. I then study the implications of the Lanham Act for children's long-run outcomes related to educational attainment, family formation, and labor market participation. Using Census data from 1970 to 1990, I assess well-being in a lifecycle framework by tracking cohorts of treated individuals throughout their prime working years. Results from difference-in-differences models suggest that the Lanham Act had strong and persistent positive effects on well-being, equivalent to a 0.36 standard deviation increase in a summary index of adult outcomes. In addition, a supplementary analysis of distributional effects shows that the benefits of the Lanham Act accrued largely to the most economically disadvantaged adults. Together, these findings shed light on the design of contemporary child care systems that balance the twin goals of increasing parental employment and enhancing child well-being. (author abstract)

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