Browse the Collection

RC Produced by Research Connections

* Peer Reviewed Journal

Current Filters: New in last 30 days [remove]; Classification:Economic & Societal Impact [remove];

3 results found.
[1]  
Select Citation
Result Resource Type

Early childhood education for low-income students: A review of the evidence and benefit-cost analysis
Kay, Noa A., January, 2014
(Document No. 14-01-2201). Olympia: Washington State Institute for Public Policy.

The 2013 Washington State Legislature directed the Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP) to review "the research evidence on components of successful early education program strategies" for low-income children. In this report, we present findings from our analysis of early childhood education (ECE) research. We conducted this analysis by reviewing all credible evaluation studies from the United States and elsewhere. We systematically analyzed the studies to estimate whether various approaches to ECE have a cause-and-effect relationship with outcomes for low-income students. We then calculated whether the long-term monetary benefits of ECE investments outweigh the costs. Research on ECE programs serving low-income children can provide insight on the effectiveness of Washington's own program, the Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program (ECEAP). The 2013 Legislature also directed WSIPP to "conduct a comprehensive retrospective outcome evaluation and return on investment analysis" of ECEAP. That evaluation will be completed by December 2014. The full legislative direction to WSIPP is in Exhibit 1 (next page). In this report, we first describe WSIPP's approach to systematic research reviews and benefit-cost analysis. We then highlight our findings on the average effectiveness of ECE for low-income children. (author abstract)

Literature Review


get fulltext

Full-day kindergarten: A review of the evidence and benefit-cost analysis
Kay, Noa A., January, 2014
(Document No. 14-01-2202). Olympia: Washington State Institute for Public Policy.

The Washington State legislature directed the Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP) to develop "a repository of research and evaluations of the cost-benefits of various K-12 educational programs and services." In this report, we analyze a K?12 policy question: do the long-term benefits of full-day kindergarten (in comparison with half-day) outweigh the costs? We researched this question by reviewing all credible evaluation studies from the United States and elsewhere. We systematically analyzed the studies to estimate whether full-day kindergarten has a cause-and-effect relationship with student outcomes. We then calculated whether the long-term monetary benefits of full-day kindergarten exceed the operating and capital costs. In this report, we describe our research approach and highlight our findings on full-day kindergarten. An appendix provides technical details. (author abstract)

Literature Review


get fulltext

*

Valuing developmental crime prevention
Manning, Matthew, May, 2013
Criminology and Public Policy, 12(2), 305-332

Economic evaluation of crime prevention-focused early intervention programs have generally been carried out by using analytic methods such as cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness, and cost-savings. The authors argue that there are significant gaps in these types of analyses and propose an alternate model which uses multicritera analysis to address complex crime prevention policy problems. This adapted analytical hierarchy process (AHP) method enables the ranking of priorities for alternative interventions that are considered to enhance quality of life and allows decision makers to separately identify the value of all the types of outcomes associated with such interventions. Five forms of early prevention programs are analyzed in this study: structured preschool programs (SPP); home visitation programs (HV); center based childcare/developmental day care (CBCC); family/parent support (FSS); and parent programs (PE). Data were collected by using two independent surveys seeking to gain information about selected stakeholders' perceptions regarding the childhood program types and the importance of specific outcome domains. Participants were based in Australia and represented policy development personnel, preschool/school leaders, academics expert in developmental crime prevention and early childhood education, and senior community agency staff. The authors conclude that the adapted model of evaluation they have presented and tested in this study provides for better policy decisions. Ways in which this method might be adopted in other areas, as well as its weaknesses, are discussed.

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Select Citation
[1]  

Search Feedback


 



Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Google Translate