Browse the Collection

RC Produced by Research Connections

* Peer Reviewed Journal

Current Filters: Pub Year:2010 [remove]; Classification:Economic & Societal Impact [remove];

43 results found.
[1]   2     >    >
Select Citation
Result Resource Type

Analyzing social experiments as implemented: A reexamination of the evidence from the HighScope Perry Preschool Program
Heckman, James J., July, 2010
(Discussion Paper No. 5065). Bonn, Germany: Institute for the Study of Labor.

A reconceptualized cost-benefit and return-on-investment analysis of the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program, based on data from the original program participants and matched data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Analyzing social experiments as implemented: A reexamination of the evidence from the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program
Heckman, James J., July, 2010
(Working Paper No. 16238). Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research.

A reconceptualized cost-benefit and return-on-investment analysis of the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program, based on data from the original program participants and matched data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Analyzing social experiments as implemented: A reexamination of evidence from the HighScope Perry Preschool Program
Heckman, James J., 22 July, 2010
Dublin, Republic of Ireland: University College, Dublin, Geary Institute.

A reconceptualized cost-benefit and return-on-investment analysis of the High/Scope Perry Preschool Program, based on data from the original program participants and matched data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Analyzing social experiments as implemented: A reexamination of the evidence from the High Scope Perry Preschool Program
Heckman, James J., July, 2010
Quantitative Economics, 1(1), 1-46

A reanalysis of data from the Perry Preschool Project, a longitudinal experimental study of the impact of a preschool education and home visitation intervention on over 715 measured outcome variables of disadvantaged children in preschool, based on data from participants from age 3 through age 40

Reports & Papers


Child care and early education in the Cook County economy: A report on the economic impact of early care and education: Executive summary
Illinois Action for Children, June 2010
Chicago: Illinois Action for Children.

A summary of an analysis of the economic impact of the child care and early education industry on the economy in Cook County, Illinois

Executive Summary


get fulltext

Child care & early education in the Cook County economy: A report on the economic impact of early care & education
Illinois Action for Children, March 2010
Chicago: Illinois Action for Children.

An analysis of the economic impact of the child care and early education industry on the economy in Cook County, Illinois

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Child care in the commercial corridors
Arlington County (Va.). Arlington Economic Development, January, 2010
Arlington: Arlington County (Va.), Arlington Economic Development.

An examination of the role of child care availability in the economic development of Arlington, Virginia, and policy recommendations for the county to both support the child care needs of local businesses and allow for the opening of child care centers in commercial locations

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Child care in the commercial corridors [Executive summary]
Arlington County (Va.). Arlington Economic Development, January, 2010
Arlington: Arlington County (Va.), Arlington Economic Development.

A summary of an examination of the role of child care availability in the economic development of Arlington, Virginia, and policy recommendations for the county to both support the child care needs of local businesses and allow for the opening of child care centers in commercial locations

Executive Summary


get fulltext

Connecting business to innovative strategies for poverty reduction: Economic benefits of early childhood investments
Child Poverty Prevention Council for Louisiana, 2010
Baton Rouge: Child Poverty Prevention Council for Louisiana.

A summary of a seminar that examines the micro- and macroeconomic benefits of spending on early childhood programs

Other


get fulltext

The cost-benefit analysis of the Preschool Curriculum Comparison Study
Schweinhart, Lawrence J., September 2010
Ypsilanti, MI: High/Scope Educational Research Foundation.

A comparison of the costs and benefits of three preschool curricula, based on longitudinal data collected at age 23 from 68 children who had been randomly assigned to one of the three curricula at age 3

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

The cost-benefit analysis of the Preschool Curriculum Comparison Study [Executive summary]
Schweinhart, Lawrence J., September 2010
Ypsilanti, MI: High/Scope Educational Research Foundation.

A summary of a comparison of the costs and benefits of three preschool curricula, based on longitudinal data collected at age 23 from 68 children who had been randomly assigned to one of the three curricula at age 3

Executive Summary


get fulltext

The costs of disinvestment: Why states canít afford to cut smart early childhood programs
Partnership for America's Economic Success, April 2010
(Issue Brief #13). Washington, DC: Partnership for America's Economic Success.

A discussion of possible negative outcomes to society that could result from statesí disinvestment in early childhood education programs due to budget cuts

Fact Sheets & Briefs


get fulltext

The costs of disinvestment: Why states canít afford to cut smart early childhood programs
Partnership for America's Economic Success, January 2010
(Issue Brief #13). Washington, DC: Partnership for America's Economic Success.

A discussion of possible negative outcomes to society that could result from statesí disinvestment in early childhood education programs due to budget cuts

Fact Sheets & Briefs


get fulltext

Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2008
United States. Bureau of the Census, 22 November, 2010
United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census, and United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2008. ICPSR23440-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2010-11-22. doi:10.3886/ICPSR23440.v1

This data collection is comprised of data from the 2008 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), and is a part of the Current Population Survey (CPS) Series. The Census Bureau conducts the ASEC (known as the Annual Demographic File prior to 2003) over a three-month period, in February, March, and April, with most of the data collected in the month of March. The ASEC uses two sets of survey questions, the basic CPS and a set of supplemental questions. The CPS, administered monthly, is a labor force survey providing current estimates of the economic status and activities of the population of the United States. Specifically, the CPS provides estimates of total employment (both farm and nonfarm), nonfarm self-employed persons, domestics, and unpaid helpers in nonfarm family enterprises, wage and salaried employees, and estimates of total unemployment. In addition to the basic CPS questions, respondents were asked questions from the ASEC, which provides supplemental data on poverty, geographic mobility/migration, and work experience. Comprehensive work experience information was given on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons aged 15 and over. Additional data for persons aged 15 and older were available concerning weeks worked and hours per week worked, reason not working full time, total income and supplemental income components. Additional data are included that cover training and assistance received under welfare reform programs such as job readiness training, child care services, or job skill training. Data covering nine noncash income sources: food stamps, school lunch program, employer-provided group health insurance plan, employer-provided pension plan, personal health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHAMPUS or military health care, and energy assistance are also included. Demographic variables include age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, veteran status, educational attainment, occupation, and income. Data on employment and income refer to the previous calendar year, although demographic data refer to the time of the survey. The original ASEC data provided by the Census Bureau are distributed in a hierarchical file structure, with three record types present: Household, Family, and Person. The ASEC is designed to be a multistage stratified sample of housing units, where the hierarchical file structure can be thought of as a person within a family within a household unit. Here the main unit of analysis is the household unit.

Data Sets


Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2009
United States. Bureau of the Census, 22 November, 2010
United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census, and United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Survey, 2009. ICPSR29642-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2010-11-22. doi:10.3886/ICPSR29642.v1

This data collection is comprised of data from the 2009 Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), and is a part of the Current Population Survey (CPS) Series. The Census Bureau conducts the ASEC (known as the Annual Demographic File prior to 2003) over a three-month period, in February, March, and April, with most of the data collected in the month of March. The ASEC uses two sets of survey questions, the basic CPS and a set of supplemental questions. The CPS, administered monthly, is a labor force survey providing current estimates of the economic status and activities of the population of the United States. Specifically, the CPS provides estimates of total employment (both farm and nonfarm), nonfarm self-employed persons, domestics, and unpaid helpers in nonfarm family enterprises, wage and salaried employees, and estimates of total unemployment. In addition to the basic CPS questions, respondents were asked questions from the ASEC, which provides supplemental data on poverty, geographic mobility/migration, and work experience. Comprehensive work experience information was given on the employment status, occupation, and industry of persons aged 15 and over. Additional data for persons aged 15 and older were available concerning weeks worked and hours per week worked, reason not working full time, total income and supplemental income components. Additional data are included that cover training and assistance received under welfare reform programs such as job readiness training, child care services, or job skill training. Data covering nine noncash income sources: food stamps, school lunch program, employer-provided group health insurance plan, employer-provided pension plan, personal health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, CHAMPUS or military health care, and energy assistance are also included. Demographic variables include age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, veteran status, educational attainment, occupation, and income. Data on employment and income refer to the previous calendar year, although demographic data refer to the time of the survey. The original ASEC data provided by the Census Bureau are distributed in a hierarchical file structure, with three record types present: Household, Family, and Person. The ASEC is designed to be a multistage stratified sample of housing units, where the hierarchical file structure can be thought of as a person within a family within a household unit. Here the main unit of analysis is the household unit.

Data Sets


*

Early childhood to young adulthood [Special issue]
Reynolds, Arthur J., August 2010
Children and Youth Services Review, 32(8)

A special issue of the journal Children and Youth Services Review, focusing on the relationship between early childhood experiences and several domains of wellbeing in adulthood

Other


get fulltext

Early learning and care impact analysis
Centre for Spatial Economics, August, 2010
Milton, Ontario, Canada: Centre for Spatial Economics.

An analysis of the economic costs and benefits of a proposed early learning and care system for Ontario, Canada

Reports & Papers


The economic and social payoffs of full day early learning: An economic analysis of the recommendations of With our best future in mind
Atkinson Centre for Society and Child Development, 2010
Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Atkinson Centre for Society and Child Development.

A summary of an analysis of the economic costs and benefits of a proposed early learning and care system for Ontario, Canada

Fact Sheets & Briefs


The economic impact of early care and education in New Mexico
Mangat, Ravinder, December, 2010
Oakland, CA: Insight Center for Community Economic Development.

An analysis of the economic role of the early care and education industry in New Mexico, in terms of individuals employed and spending on services, as well as its role in supporting other industries, parental labor force participation, and child development

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

The economic impact of Oregon's child care industry: 2010 edition
Oregon. Child Care Division, 2010
Salem: Oregon, Child Care Division.

An analysis of the economic impact of the Oregon child care industry in terms of its employment and gross receipts, as well as its role in supporting parental labor force participation and positive child outcomes

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

The economic value of the U.S. early childhood sector
Weiss, Elaine, July 2010
Washington, DC: Partnership for America's Economic Success.

An analysis of the economic impact of the early childhood sector in terms of total expenditures and its share of gross domestic product

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Education policy and crime
Lochner, Lance, April 2010
(NBER Working Paper Series No. 15894). Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research.

A model of the relationship between early childhood programs and policies and juvenile and adult crime, with an examination of evidence from studies of the long-term impact of early education on crime

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Education policy and crime
Lochner, Lance, April 2010
(CIBC Working Paper Series No. 2010-2). London, Ontario, Canada: University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre in Human Capital and Productivity.

A model of the relationship between early childhood programs and policies and juvenile and adult crime, with an examination of evidence from studies of the long-term impact of early education on crime

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Estimating the costs of bad outcomes for at-risk youth and the benefits of early childhood interventions to reduce them
Cohen, Mark A., December 2010
Criminal Justice Policy Review, 21(4), 391-434

A review of the literature of early childhood interventions that can increase educational attainment or reduce crime and delinquency, drug and alcohol abuse, smoking, child abuse and neglect, poor health outcomes, and teen pregnancy, based on the author's estimates of the costs imposed on society for each social ill

Literature Review


get fulltext

Generations unite for quality preschool: New Jersey
Generations United, May 2010
Washington, DC: Generations United.

An overview of the benefits of prekindergarten in New Jersey and of efforts to expand access and increase quality

Other


get fulltext

Select Citation
[1]   2     >    >

Search Feedback


 



Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Google Translate