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Current Filters: Resource Type:Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects [remove]; Classification:Child Care & Early Education Market [remove];

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Access to Quality Child Care in Montana: Exploring Parent and Provider Perspectives
McGregor, Gail, 2000
Montana University Affiliated Rural Institute on Disabilities, Child Care plus+

An examination of the capacity of Montana's child care system to serve Native American families and rural families of children with disabilities. The study focuses on issues of access, supply, and demand, and seeks to determine whether the availability of child care services is substantially different for Native American children and children with disabilities than for other families. Methodology includes parent and provider surveys as well as on-site assessment of child care programs.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


America Cares for Children and Youth: School-Age Care Needs Assessment and Training Project
Todd, Christine M., 2001
University of Georgia

A project documenting the demand and supply of formal and informal school-age care, particularly for ethnic minority or low-income youth, in inner city and remote rural areas of Georgia. The project also develops and evaluates community needs assessment tools and training protocols for informal caregivers.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Asymmetric Information and the Child Care Market
Lim, Youngok, 2004
Cornell University

An assessment of whether publicly available information about quality influences parents' child care choices, with an investigation of what types of providers are likely to participate in evaluations to assess child care quality, and how the results of these evaluations can influence the market. The study expands the work of the Child Care Programs of Excellence (CCPOE) project, which was designed to: (1) recruit providers and assess their quality via on-site observations; (2) develop a quality rating report and disseminate it to parents; and (3) evaluate the impact of this information on parents' and providers' choices. Quantitative data analyses are used to answer the research questions. The policy implication for this work is the feasibility and benefit of educating parents about the importance of high quality child care.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Child Care Arrangements Among Low-Income Families: A Qualitative Approach
Chaudry, Ajay, 2000
Harvard University

An analysis of child care arrangements among urban low-income families, using qualitative research methods--including interviews with mothers over a twelve month period, and observations in child care settings--to explore the following questions: (1) What are the strategies working families in low income urban communities adopt for their young children's care and development?; (2) How do different strategies affect the way children spend their time during early childhood?; and (3) What comparisons, if any, can be made in the care offered families with young children in American inner-city communities that differ by racial and ethnic composition, and/or the types of services available in those neighborhoods? The goal is to better understand individual family decisions within the context of the choices available at the community level.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


The Child Care Estimator
Besharov, Douglas J., 2004
University of Maryland

A task order awarded to the University of Maryland to provide user guides and materials to assist policymakers and their staff in navigating the Child Care Estimator statistical model. The Child Care Estimator model produces an estimated cost of meeting the total potential need for child care assistance, and a determination of the penetration rates at which the Child Care Development Fund (CCDF), Social Services Block Grant (SSBG), and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) meet the total potential service population's identified needs.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Child Care Price Dynamics in California
O'Brien-Strain, Margaret, 2001
Sphere Institute

A California child care market study with the following objectives: (1) tracing trends in price; (2) relating price changes to characteristics of supply and demand in county and sub-county markets; (3) understanding how providers set prices; and (4) assessing the effect of vouchers, reimbursement rate ceilings, or other policies on the overall price of care in the private market. Sub-study 1 is a trend analysis of provider prices from Regional Market Rate Surveys over the past decade. Sub-study 2 is a longitudinal study of 25 providers in urban San Mateo County and rural Kern County.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Child Care Quality and Consumer Education
Peters, H. Elizabeth, 2000
Cornell University

An assessment and rating of the quality of child care providers in four counties, using structural and process measures, and evaluating the impact of ratings on parent choice and the child care market structure, including supply, prices, and turnover. Ratings are made available to parents, in partnership with resource and referral agencies, and parents are surveyed to explore the types of information used to make child care decisions.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Child Care Today: Cost and Quality of Family Child Care and Infant/Toddler Care
Marshall, Nancy L., 2000
Wellesley College

A comparative study of variations in child care quality and cost across types of care, child ages, workforce characteristics, and community/neighborhood factors, using a random sample of 200 family child care homes and 100 centers serving infants and toddlers. This project is part of a larger study funded by the Massachusetts Department of Education.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


The Constraints of Choice: The Role of Race/Ethnicity, Class, and Community Context in Child Care Decisions
Laughlin, Lynda L., 2004
Temple University

An examination of the role of contextual variables in mothers' child care choices, through an identification of how child care decisions are shaped by race/ethnicity, class, and community contexts, using quantitative data from the Philadelphia Survey of Child Care and Work, and from the City of Philadelphia. The study investigates the following questions: (1) How does the neighborhood supply of licensed child care affect the use of formal or informal child care?; (2) How do child care decisions vary by racial/ethnic and socioeconomic class characteristics?; (3) How do household demographics and work characteristics influence mothers' use of formal or informal child care?; (4) How does a mother's social networks and other resources affect her use of formal or informal care?; (5) What are the consequences of using formal or informal care?; and (6) How do the previous issues vary by neighborhood/community context? The policy implication of this study is the importance of how communities act as a medium through which the supply of, and access to, child care can be measured

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Devolution of Subsidized Child Care in Texas
Schexnayder, Deanna, 2001
University of Texas at Austin

A study of the relationship between child care subsidy management policies and the supply, usage, and quality of subsidized care for low-income families in 28 local workforce regions. The study employs a detailed statistical analysis plan to guide increasingly sophisticated analyses throughout the project, and uses administrative data from several state agencies, in combination with other public data, to develop a summary profile for each region, including key policies, demographics, economic characteristics, and child care measures.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Employment and Child Care: What Can We Learn from Experimental Studies that Encourage Low-Income Parents to Work?
Michalopoulos, Charles, 2000
MDRC

An analysis of data from 22,000 recipients in 26 cities and 11 states, using existing welfare data sets from seven of the experimental evaluations conducted by the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC). The project examines how employment and income affect child care choices, how child care affects employment and income, and how these factors vary for families reporting child care barriers.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Family Income, Infant Child Care, and Child Development
Robeson, Wendy W., 2001
Wellesley College

An exploration of links among poverty, quality and cost of child care, family outcomes, other key family characteristics, and infant development at 12 and 24 months, using a random sample of 200 infants (100 girls, 100 boys) and their families from 100 centers that care for infants. This project is a collaboration among the Wellesley College Center for Research on Women, the Wellesley College Psychology Department, and Abt Associates, and is part of a larger research program addressing important issues of quality and cost in early care and education.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Guidance for Validating Child Care Market Rate Surveys
Grobe, Deana, 2004
Oregon Child Care Research Partnership

An examination of how well market rate surveys assess the price of care in various types of communities, what methods validate market rate survey findings, and the effects of child care subsidies on the larger child care market. Multiple data sources and data collection methods are used to assess validity, market representation, and cost effectiveness of market prices, including surveys of States, territories, and tribes to assess current market rate survey practices and issues, and child care administrative data, census data, and employment data to explore the relationship between child care subsidies and the price of care. The project provides knowledge needed to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of surveys whose findings guide a major investment in America's children and families.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


How is Welfare Reform Influencing Child Care Supply and Parental Choices?: Monitoring Change in California, Connecticut and Florida
Boots, Shelley Waters, 1995
California Child Care Resource and Referral Network

A project carried out as a three-state consortium consisting of the California Child Care Resource and Referral (CCR&R) Network, the University of California, Yale University, and the Florida Children's Forum, along with state- and community-level agencies and organizations. The project addresses five basic questions: (1) How is the availability of licensed child care changing as state governments in California and Florida seek to expand supply?; (2) What is the impact of these changes on the overall quality of licensed child care?; (3) How are welfare families in Connecticut selecting different types of care?; (4) How are these decisions related to children's early learning and development?; and (5) How do the contextual dynamics of child care supply within the community affect family decisions?

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


How Many is Enough? Estimating the Size of the U.S. Child Care Workforce
Young, Marci, 2000
Center for the Child Care Workforce

A project to develop a methodology for accurately quantifying the child care workforce and projecting the numbers and types of child care workers needed in the future, with an assessment of the current workforce by education and function, hours of work, and market sector. Projections take into account the needs of special populations, including racial and ethnic minorities, those with limited English proficiency, and those with disabilities.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Impact of Pre-K Expansion on Child Care for Low-Income Families
Schilder, Diane, 2007
Education Development Center

This study is designed to address questions about the association between prekindergarten (preK) expansion and the supply and quality of child care for low-income families. We are conducting a longitudinal investigation to identify changes in the supply of child care and in the quality of care for low-income working families across different types of providers and for different ages of children. Research questions include: (1) How do changes in state preK funding relate to the overall supply of child care and in the supply of child care for the children of low-income families? How does this change over time differ based on whether the county predominantly delivers preK through public schools or through child care and Head Start providers?; (2) How does the configuration of the child care market change over time as preK programs expand?; and (3) How is expansion of preK programs related to the quality of child care? How do expanded preK programs affect the quality of child care available to low-income families?

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Impacts of Child Care Policy and Welfare Reform on Child Care Markets and Low-income Parents and Children
Witte, Ann D., 2001
National Bureau of Economic Research

A study of child care needs in local areas, particularly low-income communities and those with large numbers of ethnic minority families, using 1994-2003 longitudinal data for Florida, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. Three key questions addressed are: (1) What does child care look like today?; (2) How do variations in child care and child care policy affect children?; and (3) How do variations affect parents? The study examines variation in availability, quality, and price of care for different age groups.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Linking Economic Development and Child Care
Warner, Mildred, 2002
Cornell University

A project for the development and dissemination of regional economic models to examine how the child care industry affects economic development in States and local communities, and a set of analytic tools to assist States and localities in measuring the impact of child care in their region. The project also examines how the economic development framework is used to craft new strategic partnerships and innovative approaches to child care finance and administration.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


The Massachusetts Child Care Study: Child Care Subsidies, Child Care needs and Utilization, and Choice of Care Among Low-Income Working Families
Marshall, Nancy L., 2007
Wellesley College

This study examined the child care needs of low-income working families and the impact of child care subsidies. The research questions include: (1) What types of care do families receiving subsidies choose?; (2) What is the quality of the care in programs serving low-income families?; and (3) How well does the child care accessed by low income families meet their needs and impact families' well-being?

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Minnesota Child Care Research Partnership
Swenson-Klatt, Deborah L., 2000
Minnesota, Department of Children, Families & Learning

A partnership exploring how child care affordability, quality, and accessibility affect outcomes for families and children, with a key objective of understanding the effect of State policies such as level of subsidies, tiered reimbursement, and quality regulations. Questions addressed include: (1) How does quality vary for different subgroups, including families who receive subsidies and families from different cultural groups?; (2) How do subsidies affect parents' choice of care, the quality of that care, family earnings, and employment stability?; (3) How does tiered reimbursement affect quality?; and (4) How do subsidies affect the child care market in terms of supply, cost, and quality? Both quantitative and qualitative methods are used. Data from a statewide survey of representative households provides a unique picture of families' child care arrangements, including informal care. Longitudinal analyses of administrative data examine the effect of child care subsidies on employment and earnings.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


National Center for Children in Poverty Child Care Research Partnership Wave I
Collins, Ann, 1995
Columbia University, National Center for Children in Poverty

A child care research partnership led by the National Center for Children in Poverty and consisting of 11 partners, including state-level partners in Illinois, Maryland and New Jersey, city-level partners from New York City, the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC), and Rutgers University. The partnership builds on the knowledge, research base, and practical experience of its many partners to answer questions in four general areas: (1) the nature of low-income child care markets; (2) the effects of welfare and child care policies on child care and children's development; (3) the dynamics and qualities of license-exempt child care; and (4) the relationships between communities' effective demand for and supply of regulated child care.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


National Center for Children in Poverty Child Care Research Partnership: Wave II
Kreader, J. Lee, 1997
Columbia University, National Center for Children in Poverty

A child care research partnership led by the National Center for Children in Poverty and consisting of 11 partners, including state-level partners in Illinois, Maryland and New Jersey, city-level partners from New York City, the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC), and Rutgers University. The partnership builds on the knowledge, research base, and practical experience of its many partners to answer questions in four general areas: (1) the nature of low-income child care markets; (2) the effects of welfare and child care policies on child care and children's development; (3) the dynamics and qualities of license-exempt child care; and (4) the relationships between communities' effective demand for and supply of regulated child care.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


National Study of Child Care for Low-Income Families
Layzer, Jean I., 1997
Abt Associates

A five-year research effort, in 17 states and 25 communities, designed to provide information on the responses of states and communities to the child care needs of low income families, the employment and child care choices made by low income families, and the factors that influence those choices. The study includes an in-depth, longitudinal study of low income families and their family child care providers in five of the 25 study communities.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Oregon Child Care Research and State Capacity Project
Olsen, Thomas L., 2001
Oregon, Employment Department

A collaborative project for the creation of the Oregon Data Analysis Unit, operating within the Child Care Division. Functions of the unit include: (1) developing a comprehensive, systemic performance measurement process for the Oregon child care system; (2) redesigning the child care licensing system; and (3) producing guidebooks of basic methodologies to support ongoing research and data efforts in Oregon and across the nation. The unit is also involved in two major research efforts. The first continues the Five-State Study of Child Care Subsidy Durations, addressing questions about the relationship among use of child care subsidies, employment, and stability of child care. The second uses data on child care supply and usage to capture the dynamics of the child care supply.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


Oregon Child Care Research Partnership: Wave I
Emlen, Arthur, 1995
Portland State University

A partnership formed to conduct research related to child care policy at both the state and national level, focused on three areas: (1) parent child care choices; (2) community and state needs assessment; and (3) welfare reform. The partnership brings together university-based researchers, state agency child care staff, the Head Start Collaboration Project, and the Oregon Child Care Resource and Referral Network, along with other child care practitioners.

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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