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Current Filters: New in two years [remove]; Pub Year:2009 [remove]; Classification:Parent/Family Practices and Structure [remove];

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Accumulated experience, quality of services, family characteristics and development of three-year-old children in various types of child care beginning in the first year of life: Summary
Bigras, Nathalie, November 2009
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Canadian Council on Learning.

A summary of an inquiry into the relationship between child care quality, and family characteristics during a child's first year, and children's development at age 36 months

Executive Summary


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American Time Use Survey (ATUS), 2003-2008, Multi-Year Data
United States. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2009
United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. American Time Use Survey (ATUS), 2003-2008, Multi-Year Data [Computer file]. ICPSR24943-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2010-01-04. doi:10.3886/ICPSR24943.v1

The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) collects information on how people living in the United States spend their time. Estimates show the kinds of activities people engage in and the time they spend involved in these activities by age, sex, educational attainment, labor force status, and other characteristics, as well as by weekday and weekend day. Data about the quality of life in the United States include how much time people spend working, sleeping, caring for children, volunteering, participating in religious activities, commuting, or relaxing, as well as with whom they spend their time. Information is provided about 'secondary childcare' which is defined as care for children under 13 that is done while doing something else as a primary activity.

Data Sets


American Time Use Survey (ATUS), 2008
United States. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2009
United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics. American Time Use Survey (ATUS), 2008 [Computer file]. ICPSR26149-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2009-11-16. doi:10.3886/ICPSR26149.v1

The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) collects information on how people living in the United States spend their time. Estimates show the kinds of activities people engage in and the time they spend involved in these activities by age, sex, educational attainment, labor force status, and other characteristics, as well as by weekday and weekend day. Data about the quality of life in the United States include how much time people spend working, sleeping, caring for children, volunteering, participating in religious activities, commuting, or relaxing, as well as with whom they spend their time. Information is provided about 'secondary childcare' which is defined as care for children under 13 that is done while doing something else as a primary activity.

Data Sets


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Appendix 4: A guide to understanding state child care subsidy programs through analysis of public and non-public use datasets
Zanoni Lopez, Wladimir, August 2009
New York: Child Care & Early Education Research Connections

A guide to using survey data from the Census Bureau and administrative data generated by state child care subsidy and other programs to study child care subsidy take-up rates and the relationship between parental employment and child care subsidy receipt

Other


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Can child care policy encourage employment and fertility?: Evidence from a structural model
Haan, Peter, October, 2009
(Working Paper 2009-025). Rostock, Germany: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research.

An estimation of the influence of child care policies on female employment and pregnancy rates, based on data on over 11,000 households in Germany in 2006

Reports & Papers


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Can family-support policies explain differences in working hours across countries?
Sila, Urban, October 2009
(CEP Discussion Paper No. 955). London, England, United Kingdom: London School of Economics and Political Science, Centre for Economic Performance.

An exploration of the role of public family-support programs in variations in mothers' working hours across countries, based on an analysis of household data from the European Household Panel (ECHP) and the United States Current Population Survey (CPS) from 1998 through 2001

Reports & Papers


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Childcare and family ideology in Sweden
Krapf, Sandra, December 2009
(Working Paper 2009-044). Rostock, Germany: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research.

An investigation of the effect of child care supply, in conjunction with attitudes towards family structure, on individual childbearing decisions, based on national survey data from 2001 to 2003

Reports & Papers


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Childcare and labor force participation in the Netherlands: The importance of attitudes and opinions
van Gameren, Edwin, December 2009
Review of Economics of the Household, 7(4), 395-421

An econometric study of the relationship between attitudes towards both child care and labor force participation and the decision both to participate in the labor force and to use paid child care, based data from a subsample of mothers with preschool children from a survey of 737 mothers in the Netherlands in 2004

Reports & Papers


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Child care and work challenges for Maine's parents of children with special needs
Ward, Helen D., Summer/Fall 2009
Maine Policy Review, 18(1), 82-87

An examination of child care and work issues for parents of children with special needs from focus groups and interviews with parents, child care providers, and other professionals involved with service delivery and a presentation of several strategies Maine has developed to address them

Reports & Papers


Childcare, eldercare, and labor force participation of unmarried women in urban China: 1982-2000
Maurer-Fazio, Margaret, June 2009
(Discussion Paper No. 4204). Bonn, Germany: Institute for the Study of Labor.

An exploration of the influence of location, the availability of child care and the availability care for the elderly or disabled on unmarried women's labor market participation decisions, based on data from three waves of the population census of China from 1982-2000

Reports & Papers


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Child care subsidies and the employment of single mothers
Guzman, Julio, March 2009
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Chicago, Chicago

An examination of the relationship between child care subsidies and the employment of single mothers after 1996, based on data collected in 1999 and 2002 from the National Survey of America's Families, and an examination of the relationship between free public kindergarten for 5-year-old children and employment for different groups of mothers and groups of states, based on data from the 2005, 2006 and 2007 rounds of the American Community Survey

Reports & Papers


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Does mother's employment conflict with child development?: Multilevel analysis of British mothers born in 1958
Verropoulou, Georgia, July 2009
Journal of Population Economics, 22(3), 665-692

A study of the relationship between cognitive and behavioral outcomes of school-aged children and mothers' employment in the child's preschool year, based on data of two generations in the National Child Development Study (NCDS) of over 17,000 people in Britain born in 1958

Reports & Papers


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Dynamic labour supply effects of childcare subsidies: Evidence from a Canadian natural experiment on low-fee universal child care
Lefebvre, Pierre, October 2009
Labour Economics, 16(5), 490-502

An estimate of the relationship between a low-fee universal child care policy initiated by the provincial government of Quebec and labour supply from an analysis of annual data drawn from Statistics Canada's Survey on Labour and Income Dynamics from 1993–1994 through 2007-2008

Reports & Papers


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Early family and child-care antecedents of awakening cortisol levels in adolescence
Roisman, Glenn I., May/June 2009
Child Development, 80(3), 907-920

A study of the association between the awakening cortisol levels of 15-year-old children and both the levels of maternal sensitivity they experienced as young children and the time they spent in non-parental child care as infants and toddlers, based on data collected from 863 children from 10 sites across the United States

Reports & Papers


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Effects of maternal employment and child care on the health of young children
Hubbard, Mai Noguchi, 2009
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

An examination of the relationship between both maternal employment and usage of non-parental after- and/or before-school supervision and elementary school-age children's body mass statuses from restricted use version of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 from waves 4, 5, and 6

Reports & Papers


Employment outcomes for low-income families receiving child care subsidies in Illinois, Maryland, and Texas
Goerge, Robert, August 18, 2009
Chicago: University of Chicago. Chapin Hall Center for Children

A study of the relationship between child care subsidy use and employment outcomes, and an identification of factors associated with child care subsidy use among eligible low income families, based on analysis of administrative and census data collected in Illinois, Maryland, and Texas

Reports & Papers


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Essays on welfare, children, and families
Zhu, Yi, 2009
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Michigan State University

An examination of the relationship between child care subsidies and subsidy receipt and employment of single mothers from an analysis of Current Population Survey data and state policy surveys from 2001 to 2007

Reports & Papers


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Ethnic variation in the association between family structures and practices on child outcomes at 36 months: Results from Early Head Start
Iruka, Iheoma U., January 2009
Early Education and Development, 20(1), 148-173

An examination of the associations between children’s behavioral and cognitive outcomes, family structural characteristics, and parenting practices among three samples (a total of 2,777) low income families with European American, African American, and Hispanic American ethnicities

Reports & Papers


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Exploring Parent Decision-Making: Subsidies, Employment, and Child Care
Carlin, Caroline, 2009
University of Minnesota

Decisions that parents make with regard to nonparental child care for their children are tied to other household decisions. Intuitively, we would expect the choice of maternal employment and the setting of care for young children during the mother's employment hours to be a simultaneous decision. While we refer to these decisions as "choices", it is important to recognize that these occur with the context of (often severe) resource constraints and limited information, and are influenced by social and group norms and expectations. Not all of these constraints and influences are observable by researchers, making the detangling of these choices challenging in quantitative analysis. This project uses recent, nationally-representative, longitudinal data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) and innovative statistical methods to examine parents' child care and employment decisions in the context of subsidy receipt. Research questions include: (1) What factors affect parents' decisions about employment, use of non-parental child care and type of child care used?; and (2) what is the role of child care subsidies in these decisions?

Administration for Children and Families/OPRE Projects


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Fertility, child care outside the home, and pay-as-you-go social security
Hirazawa, Makoto, July 2009
Journal of Population Economics, 22(3), 565-583

The presentation of an economic model of the influence of a pay-as-you-go social security scheme on labor supply, fertility, welfare, and parental child rearing time

Reports & Papers


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The impact of child care subsidies on low-income single parents: An examination of child care expenditures and family finances
Forry, Nicole D., March 2009
Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 30(1), 43-54

A study of the associations between child care subsidy receipt and both family finances and the out-of-pocket costs of care, based on data collected from samples of two low income populations

Reports & Papers


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Intergenerational child care support and the fluctuating fertility: A note
Yasuoka, Masaya, 2009
Economics Bulletin, 29(4), 2478-2491

An economic model of the relationship between fertility and intergenerational child care support provided by grandparents, based on the Easterlin Hypothesis

Reports & Papers


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Long-term effects of cash for childcare on mothers' labour supply
Ronsen, Marit, September 2009
Labour, 23(3), 507-533

An investigation of the long-term influence of a cash benefit for parents of 1 and 2 year old children who do not use full-time, subsidized child care on maternal employment rated

Reports & Papers


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Maintaining work: The influence of child care subsidies on child care-related work disruptions
Forry, Nicole D., July 27, 2009
Princeton, NJ: Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing.

An analysis of the relationship between parental receipt of child care subsidies and the likelihood of child care-related work disruptions, based on data from both the Wait List and the Fragile Families and Child Well-Being studies

Reports & Papers


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Maternal employment and child care decision
Coneus, Katja, April, 2009
Oxford Economic Papers, 61(s1), i172-i188

When estimating the determinants of child care participation, the simultaneity in mothers' decision to work and in the decision to use child care is a major challenge. We provide first evidence on the determinants of institutional child care use addressing the endogeneity of mothers' labor supply by applying an instrumental variables approach. This endogeneity has often been neglected in studies on child care choice, even though the decision to use child care outside the home is strongly connected to mothers' decision to work after childbirth and vice versa. Based on the German Socioeconomic Panel (SOEP) from 1989 to 2006 we show that children living in West Germany have a higher probability to attend institutional care if their mothers increase their actual weekly working time. Estimating the determining factors of child care participation without addressing the simultaneity issue substantially underestimates the influence of maternal working time. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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