Browse the Collection

RC Produced by Research Connections

* Peer Reviewed Journal

Current Filters: New in last year [remove]; Classification:Involvement In Child Care & Early Education [remove];

125 results found.

[1]   2   3   4     >    >
Select Citation
Result Resource Type

Active adult participation in early childhood education: Enhancing child learning and community wellness
Duncan, Judith,
Wellington, New Zealand: New Zealand Teaching and Learning Research Initiative.

In our qualitative research project (2010-2012), the team investigated how "ordinary" early childhood centres enacted "extraordinary" pedagogy by including families, wider whanau and communities in the "everyday" of early childhood programmes; that is, within this project, we explored both theoretical constructs and teaching and organisational strategies to increase parent participation and positive learning outcomes for children and community wellness. Our primary research question was: How does active adult participation in early childhood education enhance positive outcomes for children and their whanau? Our research included all four teaching teams, parent facilitators, and the management of the four early childhood centres, the 303 Parenting Resource Centre (hereafter referred to as 303), and the management and administrators at the Whanganui Central Baptist Kindergarten and Early Learning Centres (hereafter referred to as CBK). Judith Duncan and Sarah Te One worked alongside the CBK teams as researcher leaders over the two years of the project. Adult participation included families, whanau and, where appropriate, communities. Our research has led us to reconceptualise the roles "people, places and things". The most significant change was to embed CBK early childhood education services within the wider community, in contrast to the traditional approach to an early childhood education centre sited within a community but distinct, and sometimes isolated, from the wider community. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Aprendiendo en casa: Media as a resource for learning among Hispanic-Latino families
Lee, June H., Winter 2015
New York: Joan Ganz Cooney Center.

This report examines media use in Hispanic-Latino families with young children in the United States. Drawing from data from a national survey of parents of 2- to 10-year-olds, it extends the findings from an earlier report that sheds light on educational media use among American families (Rideout, 2014). Those findings pointed to the need to more deeply understand how Hispanic-Latino families with young children use media for learning. Hispanic-Latino families hail from a spectrum of language, access, country of origin, generational status, education, and other socio-demographic markers. These analyses aim to add to a fuller understanding of the media experiences and family contexts of children growing up in these families. In this study, we look at media access among Hispanic-Latino families, children's use of content that parents considered educational, parents' perceptions of their child's learning from educational media, parents' own use of technology for their learning, and parent-child joint engagement in media use. We also describe ways in which media can encourage conversations and extend playful activities. Given the importance of language as a proxy for a range of other socio-economic markers (including income, media access, and generational status), this study also closely examines media use by families that speak only English, only Spanish, and those that speak both languages. Case studies from ethnographic research further illustrate these issues. The report concludes with a set of implications for practitioners, designers, and researchers. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Aprendiendo en casa: Media as a resource for learning among Hispanic-Latino families
Lee, June H., Winter 2015
New York: Joan Ganz Cooney Center.

This report examines media use in Hispanic-Latino families with young children in the United States. Drawing from data from a national survey of parents of 2- to 10-year-olds, it extends the findings from an earlier report that sheds light on educational media use among American families (Rideout, 2014). Those findings pointed to the need to more deeply understand how Hispanic-Latino families with young children use media for learning. Hispanic-Latino families hail from a spectrum of language, access, country of origin, generational status, education, and other socio-demographic markers. These analyses aim to add to a fuller understanding of the media experiences and family contexts of children growing up in these families. In this study, we look at media access among Hispanic-Latino families, children's use of content that parents considered educational, parents' perceptions of their child's learning from educational media, parents' own use of technology for their learning, and parent-child joint engagement in media use. We also describe ways in which media can encourage conversations and extend playful activities. Given the importance of language as a proxy for a range of other socio-economic markers (including income, media access, and generational status), this study also closely examines media use by families that speak only English, only Spanish, and those that speak both languages. Case studies from ethnographic research further illustrate these issues. The report concludes with a set of implications for practitioners, designers, and researchers. (author abstract)

Executive Summary


get fulltext

*

Associations among parental education, home environment quality, effortful control, and preacademic knowledge
Merz, Emily C., July-August 2014
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 35(4), 304-315

This study used a longitudinal design to examine whether effortful control mediated the associations of parental education and home environment quality with preacademic knowledge in toddlers and young preschoolers. The sample consisted of 226 children (2 to 4 years of age at T1) from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds. Parents provided data on parent education and home environment quality. Children completed effortful control, early literacy, and early math assessments. T2 effortful control partially mediated the associations of T1 parental education and T1 home environment quality with T3 emergent literacy after accounting for child age, gender, race/ethnicity, T1 effortful control, and T2 early literacy. T2 effortful control partially mediated the association between T1 parental education and T3 emergent math after accounting for child age, gender, race/ethnicity, T1 effortful control, and T2 early math. Prior to entry into preschool, parental education and home environment quality may shape effortful control which in turn influences preacademic knowledge. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Black parents of preschoolers educational attainment: Implications for parenting practices
Palmer, Kalani M., 2015
NHSA Dialog, 17(4), 138-143

Within the Black community exists great variability in parenting practices; however very little research has examined the parenting heterogeneity within this group. Moreover studies of Black parents often contain samples with minimal variation in educational attainment. The purpose of this study was to identify the potential role of educational attainment in predicting parenting differences within the Black community. This study focused on home literacy promotion and parent involvement in school, two parenting practices often associated with children's academic achievement. The sample consisted of 103 Black parents with a wide range of educational attainment and preschool-aged children enrolled in urban child care centers. The results suggest that attainment of at least a Bachelor's degree is associated with a richer home literacy environment but the same pattern was not evident for parent involvement in school. Implications for parent engagement are discussed. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Casting the die before the die is cast: The importance of the home numeracy environment for preschool children
Niklas, Frank, September, 2014
European Journal of Psychology of Education, 29(3), 327-345

Mathematical competencies are important not only for academic achievement at school but also for professional success later in life. Although we know a lot about the impact of "Home Literacy Environment" on the development of early linguistic competencies, research on "Home Numeracy Environment" (HNE) and the assessment of its influence on the development of mathematical abilities is in its infancy. We still lack studies analysing this relationship and simultaneously controlling for other variables concerning the individual and the environment. Thus, in this article, we focussed on the development of mathematical competencies in a sample of 609 German children from the end of kindergarten until the end of Grade 1. In particular, we were interested in the role HNE plays in regard to this development while controlling for age, sex, intelligence, rapid naming, number span, linguistic competencies, kindergarten attendance and socioeconomic status. Moreover, HNE was compared between families with or without a history of mathematical disability. HNE was not only an important predictor of mathematical abilities at the end of kindergarten, but it also influenced the further development of mathematical competencies above and beyond its initial impact. Families with a history of dyscalculia provided a more unfavourable HNE than families with no such problems. Results are shown in a structural equation model, which highlights the importance of HNE. The findings indicate that those involved in policy and intervention should focus more on the learning environments in families to improve children's achievement. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Changing patterns of parent-teacher communication and parent involvement from preschool to school
Murray, Elizabeth, 2014
Early Child Development and Care, (), 1-22

This study investigated the nature of parent involvement and parent-educator communication in prior-to-school early childhood settings and school, to explore relations to social capital variables and consistencies and changes in practices over time. Parent interview and teacher questionnaire data from two waves of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children were analysed. Results indicated that parental involvement and communication decreased as children moved from prior-to-school settings to school. Educators in both settings reported using similar strategies to promote parent involvement and communication, but there were setting differences for parents' ratings of communication effectiveness. Using regression analyses, family socio-economic position (SEP), home language (English versus other), Indigenous status and home educational activities were examined as predictors of parent involvement and communication strategies, and effectiveness. Results showed that parents who were more engaged in education activities at home were more involved in their child's early childhood and school settings, had more frequent communication with educators and rated educator communication effectiveness more highly. SEP and home language were less consistent predictors, and Indigenous status was not associated with any of the measures. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Children in Gearing Up for Kindergarten make progress in early math, reading skills
North Dakota State University. Extension Service, 2014
Fargo: North Dakota State University, Extension Service.

This fact sheet highlights outcomes in the areas of early math and reading, based on responses by parents who participated with their child(ren) in the Gearing Up for Kindergarten program during the 2013-14 year.

Fact Sheets & Briefs


get fulltext

Children's early literacy practices at home and in early years settings: Second annual survey of parents and practitioners
Formby, Susie, December, 2014
London: National Literacy Trust (Great Britain).

This report outlines findings from Pearson and the National Literacy Trust's second annual early years literacy survey, conducted in May to July 2014. 1,012 parents of children aged 3 to 5 and 567 early years practitioners who work with this age group participated. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Children's early literacy practices at home and in early years settings: Second annual survey of parents and practitioners: Key findings
Formby, Susie, 2014
London: National Literacy Trust (Great Britain).

This report outlines findings from Pearson and the National Literacy Trust's second annual early years literacy survey, conducted in May to July 2014. 1,012 parents of children aged 3 to 5 and 567 early years practitioners who work with this age group participated. Attainment data in the form of vocabulary abilities were available for a subsample of 183 children. The report not only examines children's access to books and to technology, as well as their early reading habits, but it also examines the impact of these practices on young children's vocabulary. Within this report we seek to answer the following key questions: How often do children look at or read stories at home and in early years settings, and what is the impact on children's vocabulary? How do parents support their children in story-related activities? Are there differences in engagement in reading activities at home and vocabulary outcomes for children from different socioeconomic backgrounds or by gender? Does looking at or sharing stories using technology provide any additional benefit to children? What are the key changes between 2013 and 2014? (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Children's literacy interest and its relation to parents' literacy-promoting practices
Hume, Laura E., May, 2015
Journal of Research in Reading, 38(2), 172-193

This study examined how children's literacy interests related to parent literacy-promoting practices across time. Using a sample of 909 preschool-age children and the newly developed Child Activities Preference Checklist, literacy interest appeared to be a complex construct, not easily captured by a single measure. In a subsample of 230 children with longitudinal data, parent literacy practices and child literacy interests related concurrently and across time. Parent literacy practices were more stable than child literacy interests, with children's literacy interest continuing to develop over the preschool year. Parent practices of exposing children to literacy and teaching them literacy concepts appeared to be distinct constructs. Exposure to literacy was especially important in the growth of literacy interests and the hypothesis that exposure has a negative effect on children with little initial interest was not fully supported. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Classroom-to-home connections: Young children's experiences with a technology-based parent involvement tool
Walsh, Bridget A., November, 2014
Early Education and Development, 25(8), 1142-1161

DVD classroom newsletters are one proposed technology tool to promote classroom-to-home connections. The present study explored the experiences of prekindergarten children from predominantly Spanish-speaking homes with bilingual (English and Spanish) DVD classroom newsletters. On average, parents reported that children watched each DVD nearly 3 times. Interviews with children and other sources, including parent logs, teacher logs, and a teacher focus group, also captured children's experiences. Findings indicate that children have overall positive experiences with watching DVD classroom newsletters at home. Practice or Policy: Overall the findings support the use of DVD newsletters in prekindergarten programs as a way to create an opportunity to empower children, strengthen their digital literacy, extend the learning environment, and provide opportunities for meaningful conversations in the classroom and home. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Click, swipe, and read: Sharing e-books with toddlers and preschoolers
Hoffman, Jessica L., November, 2014
Early Childhood Education Journal, 42(6), 379-388

e-Books share some key features with traditional printed picture books, but also include distinct features such as live animation, interactive components, and the operation of the technology that require new approaches to shared reading with young children. The purpose of this paper is to better inform adults working with young children (teachers, child care providers, and parents) of important factors to consider when choosing and sharing e-books with young children. We discuss why to share e-books with young children; types of e-books and how to evaluate them; how adults can best support young children's language and literacy development through shared readings of e-books, including examples of shared readings of an e-book with young children; and an exploration of the potential of e-books to support meaningful interactions around texts. (author abstract)

Other


get fulltext

*

Comparing emergent-literacy skills and home-literacy environment of children with autism and their peers
Dynia, Jaclyn M., November, 2014
Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 34(3), 142-153

The purpose of the current study was to characterize and compare the emergent-literacy skills, print interest, and home-literacy environment of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to their peers, as well as to examine the association between children's emergent-literacy skills and their home-literacy environment. Results indicated that children with ASD had significantly higher alphabet knowledge and significantly lower print-concept knowledge when controlling for language ability compared with their peers. Children with ASD also had significantly lower print interest than their typical peers. Moreover, print interest and frequency of storybook reading were related to children's alphabet knowledge. Clinical implications and areas for future research are discussed. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Connecting the dots: Raising A Reader builds evidence base for its parent engagement and early literacy program
Walker, Karen E., November, 2014
(Child Trends Publication No. 2014-60). Bethesda, MD: Child Trends.

Raising A Reader is working with Child Trends, an independent evaluator, to use research to continue to inform and improve its program and to prepare for a large-scale impact evaluation in typical RAR settings. This report offers a case study that may be informative to other programs in the parent engagement/early literacy field that seek to use a variety of informal and formal data effectively for continuous quality improvement and to build their evidence base. The report first summarizes the research base for family literacy programs and the emerging evidence base for RAR. It then describes the RAR program and how it uses a variety of data to regularly improve its program, inform programming integrity, and prepare for a randomized controlled trial. In closing, the report addresses the lessons for the broader field. (author abstract)

Other


get fulltext

*

Cultural negotiation: Moving beyond a cycle of misunderstanding in early childhood settings
De Gioia, Katey, June, 2013
Journal of Early Childhood Research, 11(2), 108-122

Developing partnerships with families is critical in childcare services. However, families and early childhood educators bring to settings different cultural backgrounds, experiences and expectations of their role and the role of the childcare service. These differences can impact the family-educator partnership. This article examines some issues that arise when there is a disparity in understanding of expectations, which can result when educators are attempting to provide continuity of care-giving practices and families are hesitant about sharing their home practices. This study explores communication processes and expectations of continuity of care between home and early childhood setting. A social constructivism approach using qualitative methods of data gathering explored family and educator perceptions of continuity between home and setting. A cycle of misunderstanding is explained that ascribes characteristics of possible family educators' responses as a result of a poor understanding between roles. The discussion draws together the need to ascertain processes for negotiating with families and exploring practices that support the building of partnerships between families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and educators in childcare settings. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Daily welcoming in childcare centre as a microtransition: An exploratory study
Venturelli, Elena, 2015
Early Child Development and Care, (), 1-16

This study focuses on the everyday morning microtransition in childcare centres that involves child-parent separation. This moment involves the contemporary presence of the child, caregiver and parent in the day-care centre. This coexistence is considered extremely relevant and full of important meanings for the interactive patterns they will build together and for the children's development. In order to explore this topic, 4 children (mean age 26 months), their parents and 3 caregivers were observed in a day-care centre for 3 months, for a total of 20 video-observations. Using a triadic perspective and microanalytic analysis method, the observations were analysed through the application of the triadic interaction analytical procedure. The results showed different interactive sequence processes to the microtransition from the parent-child interaction to the child-caregiver interaction. However, various types of interactive patterns emerged in relation to the child-parent-caregiver interaction, which show the active role of all the members in the co-construction of the interactive dynamic. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Does parent involvement and neighborhood quality matter for African American boys' kindergarten mathematics achievement?
Baker, Claire E., April, 2015
Early Education and Development, 26(3), 342-355

There is growing evidence that home learning stimulation that includes informal numeracy experiences can promote math-related learning in school. Furthermore, national studies suggest that children who start kindergarten with stronger math skills are more likely to succeed in high school. This study used a large sample of African American boys to examine family, neighborhood, and demographic predictors of math achievement at kindergarten entry. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that mothers who engaged in more frequent home learning stimulation that included informal numeracy experiences (e.g., playing counting games) had sons who entered kindergarten with more advanced math skills. In addition, older, more educated mothers with fewer children living in their homes had sons with more advanced math skills at kindergarten entry. Practice or Policy: Findings suggest that home-based parent involvement that helps children make sense of numbers in ways that are meaningful for them can promote math skills at kindergarten entry. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Early childhood program participation, from the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2012: First look
Mamedova, Saida, May, 2015
(NCES 2013-029.rev). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.

A study of early care and education arrangements of children from birth through age 5, families' child care expenses, and parents' involvement in children's early learning, based on data from the nationally representative National Household Education Survey 2012

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Early literacy practices and beliefs among Hispanic families in Jacksonville, Florida
Martelo, Maira Luz, November, 2014
Jacksonville: Florida Institute of Education.

The findings presented in this policy brief are taken from a mixed-method study that compared beliefs about education and literacy practices among Latino caregivers who had their 4-year-old children enrolled in the Florida Voluntary Prekindergarten Program (VPK) and parents who had not enrolled their children in early childhood programs at the time of the study (Martelo, 2013). A total of 125 surveys were collected from 74 caregivers with children enrolled in VPK and 51 without children enrolled in VPK. Twenty interviews were conducted: 10 with Hispanic parents with children enrolled in VPK and 10 without children enrolled in VPK. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Early reading practices improve for children in Gearing Up for Kindergarten (2012-13)
North Dakota State University. Extension Service, 2014
Fargo: North Dakota State University, Extension Service.

This fact sheet highlights improvements in early reading practices for parents and children who participated in the Gearing Up for Kindergarten program during the 2012-13 year, based on parental responses.

Fact Sheets & Briefs


get fulltext

*

Effects of parent and child pre-intervention characteristics on child skill acquisition during a school readiness intervention
Mathis, Erin T. B., Q4 2015
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 33(4), 87-97

Two-hundred preschool children in Head Start (55% girls; 20% Hispanic, 25% African-American, 55% European American; [mean] age = 4.80 years old) participated in a randomized-controlled trial of a home visiting intervention designed to promote emergent literacy skills (the Research-based Developmentally Informed parent [REDI-P] program). This study explored concurrent changes in levels of parent support and child literacy skills that occurred over the course of the intervention, and examined the impact of pre-intervention parent support and child literacy skills as potential moderators of parent and child outcomes. Cross-lagged structural equation models and follow-up analyses indicated that intervention had the strongest impact on child literacy skills when parents were high on support at the pre-intervention assessment. Conversely, the REDI-Parent program promoted the greatest gains in parent support when parents entered the program with low levels of support. These findings suggest that families may benefit from home visiting school readiness interventions in different ways: child skill acquisition may be greatest when parents are initially high in support, whereas parenting may improve most when parents are initially low in support. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Evaluating the Foundation Phase: Key findings on children and families
Waldron, Samuel, 11 November, 2014
(No.: 94/2014). Cardiff, United Kingdom: Wales, Social Research Division.

The Foundation Phase (introduced in 2008) provides a developmentally appropriate experiential curriculum for children aged 3-7 in Wales. The Welsh Government commissioned independent evaluation (led by WISERD) aims to evaluate how well it is being implemented, what impact it has had, and ways in which it can be improved. The three-year evaluation utilises a range of mixed methods at a national and local scale. This is one of four papers focused on implementation. It draws on 239 classroom/setting observations, 341 practitioner interviews, 604 school/setting and 671 Year 2 survey responses, 1,008 parent/carer survey responses, 37 Local Authority interviews, four non-maintained organisation interviews and direct work with children. (author abstract)

Fact Sheets & Briefs


get fulltext

Evaluation of Chicago Public Schools' Virtual Pre-K Ready for Math Program that integrates PBS Kids Lab digital math content: A report to the CPB-PBS Ready To Learn Initiative
McCarthy, Betsy, October, 2012
San Francisco: WestEd.

This report describes a research study of Chicago Public Schools' Virtual Pre-K (VPK) Math Program and its integration of the PBS KIDS transmedia resources in 12 Chicago schools during the 2011-2012 academic year. Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, the Ready To Learn grant supports the development of educational television programs and digital media targeted at preschool and early elementary school children and their families. Its goal is to promote early learning and school readiness, with a particular interest in reaching children from low-income families. WestEd assessed the VPK Math Program's effectiveness with regard to increasing teachers' and parents' comfort with mathematics, use of digital media for education, and home-school engagement. This research study, which is one component of the Year 2 Ready To Learn grant with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS), also provides program administrators and PBS with useful feedback to facilitate further development, refinement, and replication of the VPK Math Program. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Evaluation of Chicago Public Schools' Virtual Pre-K Ready for Math Program that integrates PBS Kids Lab digital math content: A report to the CPB-PBS Ready To Learn Initiative [Executive summary]
McCarthy, Betsy, October, 2012
San Francisco: WestEd.

This report describes a research study of Chicago Public Schools' Virtual Pre-K (VPK) Math Program and its integration of the PBS KIDS transmedia resources in 12 Chicago schools during the 2011-2012 academic year. Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, the Ready To Learn grant supports the development of educational television programs and digital media targeted at preschool and early elementary school children and their families. Its goal is to promote early learning and school readiness, with a particular interest in reaching children from low-income families. WestEd assessed the VPK Math Program's effectiveness with regard to increasing teachers' and parents' comfort with mathematics, use of digital media for education, and home-school engagement. This research study, which is one component of the Year 2 Ready To Learn grant with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS), also provides program administrators and PBS with useful feedback to facilitate further development, refinement, and replication of the VPK Math Program. (author abstract)

Executive Summary


get fulltext

Select Citation
[1]   2   3   4     >    >

Search Feedback

Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Google Translate