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The 2012 Pennsylvania Kindergarten Entry Inventory pilot
Pennsylvania. Office of Child Development and Early Learning, May, 2013
Harrisburg: Pennsylvania, Office of Child Development and Early Learning.

As Pennsylvania builds a high-quality and accountable system of early childhood programs, parents, teachers and state administrators have expressed a need for information on the status of children's skills and abilities as they enter kindergarten. This report provides information about the development and pilot of the Pennsylvania Kindergarten Entry Inventory. (author abstract)

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The 2013 Pennsylvania Kindergarten Entry Inventory pilot
Pennsylvania. Office of Child Development and Early Learning, June, 2014
Harrisburg: Pennsylvania, Office of Child Development and Early Learning.

As Pennsylvania builds a high-quality and accountable system of early childhood programs, parents, teachers and state administrators have expressed a need for information on the status of children's skills and abilities as they enter kindergarten. This report provides information about the development and pilot of the Pennsylvania Kindergarten Entry Inventory. (author abstract)

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Adapted Teaching Style Rating Scale
Raver, C. Cybele, 2012
New York: MDRC.

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Advancing the construct validity of the Early Communication Indicator (ECI) for infants and toddlers: Equivalence of growth trajectories across two Early Head Start samples
Greenwood, Charles R., Q4 2013
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 28(4), 743-758

The Early Communication Indicator (ECI) is a measure for universal screening, intervention decision-making, progress monitoring for infants and toddlers needing higher levels of support, and program accountability. In the context of the ECI's long-term wide-scale use for these purposes, we examined the invariance of ECI measurement in two samples of the same Early Head Start (EHS) population differing in the years data were collected. Invariance or equivalence across samples is an important step in measurement validation because making inferences assumes that the measurements are factorially invariant. A number of time-covarying factors (e.g., assessors, children, etc.) can be hypothesized as threats to measurement invariance. Results of latent growth curve analyses indicated similarity in the functional forms (velocity and shape) of the ECIs four key skill trajectories between groups of children and ECI vocalizations, single, and multiple words trajectories met strong factorial and structural invariance. Gestures met only weak factorial invariance. ECI total communications, a weighted composite of the four scales, also met both strong factorial and structural invariance. With one exception, results indicated that the ECI produced comparable growth estimates over different conditions of programs, assessors, and children over time, strengthening the construct validity of the ECI. Implications are discussed. (author abstract)

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Agreement between parents and teachers on preschool children's behavior in a clinical sample with externalizing behavioral problems
Korsch, Franziska, October, 2014
Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 45(5), 616-627

An accurate interpretation of information obtained from multiple assessors is indispensible when complex diagnoses of behavioral problems in children need to be confirmed. The present study examined the similarity of parents and kindergarten teachers ratings on children's behavior in a sample of 160 preschool children (a clinical group including 80 children with externalizing behavioral problems and a matched control group including 80 children). Behavioral problems were assessed using the SDQ, and the DISYPS-II questionnaires for ADHD and conduct disorders. The results revealed low levels of parent-teacher agreement for their ratings on the children's behavior in both groups with the highest correlations in the non-clinical sample. Parent-teacher agreement did not differ significantly across the samples. Parent and teacher ratings correlated with the prevalence of externalizing disorders and were found to be almost independent of each other. The results highlight the importance of multiple informants and their independent influence within the diagnostic process. (author abstract)

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Approaches to validating child care quality rating and improvement systems (QRIS): Results from two states with similar QRIS type designs
Lahti, Michel, 2014
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, (), 1-11

In recent years, child care quality rating and improvement systems (QRISs) have become an increasingly popular policy tool to improve quality in early childhood education and care (ECEC) settings and have been adopted in many localities and states. The QRIS proposition is that with higher-quality child care settings, it is more likely that children who attend those high-quality programs will benefit in terms of outcomes like school readiness. However, in order to demonstrate this linkage, QRIS standards and ratings must function as intended, i.e. be valid. This paper presents a framework for validating child care quality improvement standards and processes, along with examples from recent QRIS validation studies in two states. The state examples provide useful data about the strengths and limitations of these validation approaches. We discuss the implications of applying these approaches and provide recommendations to researchers, policy-makers, and program leaders who implement QRIS validation studies. (author abstract)

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Assessing quality in toddler classrooms using the CLASS-Toddler and the ITERS-R
La Paro, Karen M., August, 2014
Early Education and Development, 25(6), 875-893

Many very young children attend early care and education programs, but current information about the quality of center-based care for toddlers is scarce. Using 2 observation instruments, the Infant-Toddler Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ITERS-R) and the Classroom Assessment Scoring System, Toddler Version (CLASS-Toddler), 93 child care classrooms for toddlers across the state of North Carolina, representing a range of quality, were assessed to determine overall quality, and associations between observed quality and teachers' ratings of child behavior problems and competence outcomes using the Brief Infant Toddler Social Emotional Assessment. Research Findings: Findings indicated that overall, toddler classrooms were rated as being of moderate quality. Associations between observed quality and teacher-reported child behavior problems and competence outcomes indicated that CLASS-Toddler ratings were positively associated with fewer behavior problems; specifically, children in classrooms with higher levels on the CLASS-Toddler domains of Emotional and Behavioral Support as well as Engaged Support for Learning were reported to have fewer behavior problems. Similarly, the ITERS-R subscales of Interaction and Listening and Talking were positively related to fewer reported behavior problems. Regression models showed that the CLASS-Toddler Emotional and Behavioral Support domain predicted differences in child behavior problems. (author abstract)

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Assessment in early childhood: Instruction-focused strategies to support response-to-intervention frameworks
Snyder, Patricia A., December, 2008
Assessment for Effective Intervention, 34(1), 25-34

The current emphasis on alignment of early learning guidelines, assessment, curricular practices, and accountability in early education and care systems has provided an opportunity to revisit and refine early childhood assessment practices. Practitioners, researchers, and policy makers are increasingly interested in developing instruction-focused assessment strategies that have instructional and intervention validity. In particular, progress is being made in the development and validation of universal screening assessments and progress-monitoring methods that can support the application of response-to-intervention models in early childhood settings. This article provides a brief review of select assessment tools in early childhood that demonstrate instructional validity. The authors suggest future directions for strengthening the instructional and intervention validity of early childhood assessments in the context of response-to-intervention frameworks. (author abstract)

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Career Interest Questionnaire
Tyler-Wood, Tandra L., April, 2010
Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 18(2), 341-363

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Childcare and Early Years Providers Survey 2013: Survey materials
Brind, Richard, September, 2014
Manchester, United Kingdom: Great Britain, Department for Education.

These survey materials were used to conduct the 2013 Childcare and Early Years Providers Survey, a study of child care and early years providers and the workforce in England.

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Childcare and Early Years Providers Survey 2013: Technical report
Brind, Richard, September, 2014
Manchester, United Kingdom: Great Britain, Department for Education.

In order to inform policy development, the Government needs reliable information on the key characteristics of provision in the early years and childcare sector. Robust information on the workforce, the providers operating in the sector and the number of children attending are vital inputs to the policy decision making process. The Childcare and Early Years Providers Survey provides a very broad range of measures that help to address information needs in these areas. In addition to the Childcare and Early Years Providers Survey conducted in 2013, the Department for Education (DfE) and its predecessor departments also commissioned earlier waves of this survey. As such, the Childcare and Early Years Providers Survey began in 1998 and was repeated in 2001, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011. The 2013 research, which is the focus of this report, consisted of surveys amongst the ten following types of settings: Full-day childcare; Sessional childcare; Children's centres (focusing primarily on full-day care and which are a sub-set of full-day care as a whole); Before school care; After school care; Holiday care; Childminders; Primary schools with nursery and reception classes; Primary schools with reception but no nursery classes; Nursery schools. (author abstract)

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Children, mathematics, and videotape: Using multimodal analysis to bring bodies into early childhood assessment interviews
Parks, Amy Noelle, June, 2014
American Educational Research Journal, 51(3), 505-537

Despite the increased use of video for data collection, most research using assessment interviews in early childhood education relies solely upon the analysis of linguistic data, ignoring children's bodies. This trend is particularly troubling in studies of marginalized children because transcripts limited to language can make it difficult to analyze embodied power relations between majority researchers and minority children. This article responds to this problem by outlining a theoretical position on power and bodies, describing multimodal analysis strategies, and using these strategies to analyze the subject positions available during a mathematical assessment interview for three African American preschool child-participants and the European American adult researcher. This study draws attention to the complexity of human interactions during assessment interviews by describing the ways children positioned themselves as willing (or not), attentive (or not), and competent (or not) as well as describing the ways the researcher sought to position herself. (author abstract)

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Children's Engagement Questionnaire
McWilliam, R. A., 1991
Chapel Hill, NC: Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center

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Children's Progress Academic Assessment
Children's Progress, 2010
New York: Children's Progress

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Chinese Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale (trial) (CECERS): A validity study
Li, Kejian, Q3 2014
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 29(3), 268-282

The Chinese Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale (trial) (CECERS) is a new instrument for measuring early childhood program quality in the Chinese socio-cultural contexts, based on substantial adaptation from the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised Edition (ECERS-R). This paper describes the development and validation process of CECERS. Empirical data were collected from a stratified random sample 178 classrooms, from which a random sample of 1012 children was measured for child development outcomes. Guided by the framework of broad conceptualization of validity and validation as advocated by Messick (1989), evidence in a variety of forms is presented and discussed, including content validity considerations (e.g., measuring socially and culturally relevant domains), measurement reliability considerations (e.g., internal consistency reliability, inter-rater reliability), and measurement validity considerations (concurrent validity, criterion-related validity, internal structure based on exploratory factor analysis). The empirical findings for CECERS compare very favorably with the validation outcomes of ECERS-R. The body of evidence accumulated in the validation process supports the use and interpretation of CECERS scores as quality indicators of early childhood education program in the Chinese social and cultural contexts. Limitations and future directions are also discussed. (author abstract)

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CLASS-Infant: An observational measure for assessing teacher-infant interactions in center-based child care
Jamison, Kristen Roorbach, May, 2014
Early Education and Development, 25(4), 553-572

The growing body of literature demonstrating the importance of quality interactions with caregivers to infant development coupled with the increasing number of infants spending time in classroom settings highlights the need for a measure of interpersonal relationships between infants and caregivers. This article introduces a new measure of quality in infant classrooms based on the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) framework. This measure focuses on teacher-infant interactions with the goal of understanding how these proximal process features can be assessed in this environment. Results from a small pilot study of 30 infant classrooms indicated that the CLASS-Infant demonstrated adequate variability as well as expected convergent and divergent validity with the most commonly used infant child care quality measure. The dimensions of the measure composed a single construct of classroom quality based on teacher-infant interactions. Practice or Policy: Implications of using this measure as an assessment of center-based infant classroom quality and improving professional development are discussed. (author abstract)

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Classroom Literacy Observation Schedule
Louden, William, 2003
Perth, Western Australia, Australia: Edith Cowan University

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Comparing apples and oranges: The mismeasurement of young children through the mismatch of assessment purpose and the interpretation of results
Hallam, Rena A., August, 2014
Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 34(2), 106-115

The assessment of young children in early childhood special education is a central area of educational practice. The results of child assessments often have significant implications for young children, their families, and the programs that serve them, including eligibility for special education services, instructional planning, and documentation of child outcomes. The array of early childhood assessment types and purposes can be challenging to disentangle at the practitioner and policy level. At this time, different types of assessment tools (e.g., norm-referenced and criterion-referenced) are being used to document the development and learning of children and little attention has been paid to the parallel information produced from different assessment types. The purpose of this study is to compare the assessment results from two types of developmental instruments commonly used (Assessment, Evaluation, and Programming System Second Edition [AEPS 2nd ed.] and Battelle Developmental Inventory II [BDI-2]) to determine their congruence in determining a child's developmental status (e.g., "on track" or delayed). Results indicate substantive difference between the two measures highlighting the potential for mismeasurement and misinterpretation of child assessment data. Implications for policy and practice are discussed. (author abstract)

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Comparisons among quality measures in child care settings: Understanding the use of multiple measures in North Carolina's QRIS and their links to social-emotional development in preschool children
Hestenes, Linda L., 2014
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, (), 1-16

Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) include the assessment of classroom quality as one component of how early childhood programs are monitored and licensed in many states across the United States. However, varying measures and foci of quality exist and have led to challenges in accurately depicting program quality across programs and improvement efforts. The current validation study explores several measures of classroom quality and their associations with components and overall star ratings of the North Carolina QRIS and preschool children's social-emotional outcomes within center-based child care programs. Data for this study were collected in 2009, 10 years after the start of North Carolina's QRIS. Results indicate that individual levels of star ratings did not generally represent distinctive levels of classroom quality, but did differentiate classrooms at the lower and higher levels of quality. Structural features of the environments such as teacher education and teacher-child ratio were associated with classroom quality across these measures in the expected directions; however, teacher experience was not. Further, children's social-emotional outcomes were predicted to a varying degree by star levels and different aspects of classroom quality as represented by these various measures. Results are discussed in terms of the differing levels of quality and teaching processes in classrooms. Future directions for research are presented to contribute to an increased understanding of QRIS and children' experiences in early care and education programs. (author abstract)

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Conceptualizing and measuring collaboration in the context of early childhood care and education
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, August, 2013
(Research Brief OPRE 2013-29). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

Despite the fact that many early childhood initiatives depend on the collaboration of multiple organizations and stakeholders, little is known about what makes for successful collaboration within the field of early care and education. In May of 2010, a working meeting was convened by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation to begin to address this issue. This brief builds on work that began during that meeting and extended in the years that followed, particularly work identifying the key components of collaborations and developing a logic model for measuring collaboration in an early childhood context. The first section of this brief presents the logic model, explains its core components, and highlights these components by mapping them onto a hypothetical example of collaboration in early care and education. The next section of the brief shares the results from an extensive review of existing measures of collaboration. Thirty-two measures were found. The last section of the brief describes key measurement considerations and offers some discussion of future directions for collaboration research in the field of early care and education. (author abstract)

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Connecting the dots: The promise of integrated data systems for policy analysis and systems reform
Culhane, Dennis P., 22 March, 2010
(2nd ed., Departmental Papers (SPP) School of Social Policy and Practice Vol. 1, no. 3). Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, Intelligence for Social Policy.

This article explores the use of integrated administrative data systems in support of policy reform through interagency collaboration and research. The legal, ethical, scientific and economic challenges of interagency data sharing are examined. A survey of eight integrated data systems, including states, local governments and university-based efforts, explores how the developers have addressed these challenges. Some exemplary uses of the systems are provided to illustrate the range, usefulness and import of these systems for policy and program reform. Recommendations are offered for the broader adoption of these systems and for their expanded use by various stakeholders. (author abstract)

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Creating space for infants to influence ECEC practice: The encounter, ecart, reversibility and ethical reflection
Elwick, Sheena, August, 2014
Educational Philosophy and Theory, 46(8), 873-885

The idea that infant participation in research is achievable by researchers 'voicing' infants' experiences and 'perspectives' is a central feature of current moves towards participatory research. In this article we offer an alternative. Specifically, we suggest a different point of reference than infants' own experiences and 'perspectives'; namely, the encounter between researcher and infant as it unfolds in practice. Drawing from a large-scale study of infants in family day care, and Merleau-Ponty's notions of ecart and reversibility, we articulate the possibility that infants' participation in research encounters may be felt by researchers in the ways that infants evoke embodied responses. Drawing on Dillon's ethics of particularity, which builds upon ecart and reversibility, we discuss the idea that researchers' embodied responses to infants provoke possibilities for ethical reflection, which can afford new ways of 'going on'. We propose that space may be created for infants to influence ECEC practice when researchers attend to their own embodied responses to infants during the research encounter; and to the factors that may diminish infants' capacities to affect such responses. (author abstract)

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A cross-cultural comparison of positive behavioral interventions and supports in early childhood classrooms in the United States and South Korea
Steed, Elizabeth A., January-March 2014
Infants and Young Children, 27(1), 30-42

This study examined the implementation of critical features associated with positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) in early childhood classrooms in the United States and South Korea. Each country has a distinct approach to providing early education for young children. There is some evidence that preschool teachers' approaches to managing young children's challenging behavior are influenced by cultural and contextual factors unique to each country. Differences in implementation status were measured using the Preschool-wide Evaluation Tool (PreSET) in early childhood classrooms in both countries. Preschool teachers in the United States used significantly more features of universal tier and program-wide PBIS related to defining and teaching behavioral expectations, responding to appropriate and challenging behavior, providing an organized and predictable environment, and having a leadership team and program support. South Korean teachers collaborated with families significantly more than teachers in the United States. Factors related to cultural variance in PBIS implementation are discussed. (author abstract)

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Cross-site evaluation of the supporting evidence-based home visiting grantee cluster: Evaluation design volume 1
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 30 October, 2009
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

In 2008, the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funded 17 grants, through cooperative agreements, to address this knowledge gap and prevent child maltreatment. Grantees are to leverage their grant funding with other funding sources to support the EBHV grantee-selected programs and practices. Specifically, grantees are to focus on supporting implementation of, scaling up, and sustaining home visiting programs with high fidelity to their evidence-based models. In addition, grantees will contribute to the knowledge base about large-scale implementation with fidelity by conducting local implementation and outcome evaluations, along with analyses of program costs. Each cooperative agreement runs for five years. The first year (fiscal year [FY] 2008-2009) was a planning year; grantees are to implement their plans during the remaining four years (FY 2009-2010 through FY 2012-2013). CB/ACF has funded Mathematica Policy Research and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, along with our consultant Brenda Harden Jones from the University of Maryland, to conduct a six-year cross-site evaluation of the grantees' programs. As in the cooperative agreements, the first year of the cross-site evaluation was a planning year. Mathematica-Chapin Hall, in collaboration with the 17 EBHV grantees and their local evaluators, will conduct the cross-site evaluation during the remaining five years. The primary purpose of the cross-site evaluation is to identify successful strategies for adopting, implementing, and sustaining high-quality home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment. The evaluation was designed to be participatory and utilization-focused, engaging the grantees and other stakeholders at key points in the process and incorporating information gathered back into the program models and evaluation framework. To achieve these goals, the Mathematica-Chapin Hall team will support rigorous local evaluations carried out within a Peer Learning Network (PLN), and use data from local evaluations and crosssite research to assess participant, program, and systems outcomes. A unique feature of this evaluation is the careful attention it will pay to the infrastructure supports for and the implementation fidelity of the home visiting programs. The cross-site evaluation will add to the current home visiting evaluation literature, which tends to focus specifically on program impacts. The cross-site evaluation will focus on domains central to the implementation and monitoring of home visiting programs: systems change, fidelity to the evidence-based model, costs of home visiting programs, and family and child outcomes. The cross-site evaluation also will analyze the process that each grantee uses to implement the grant. This report describes the cross-site evaluation design. The Mathematica-Chapin Hall team worked closely with the 17 EBHV grantees and their local evaluators, as well as CB/ACF and other federal partners, to design the cross-site evaluation. (author abstract)

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Cross-site evaluation of the supporting evidence-based home visiting grantees: Summary of the planning year
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 09 November, 2009
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

An overview of the planning and design efforts in the first year of a cross-site evaluation of 17 grantees participating in the implementation of evidence-based home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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