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Achieving a State of Healthy Weight Rating Scales
National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care (U.S.), May, 2013
Aurora, CO: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care.

Instruments


Adapted Teaching Style Rating Scale
Raver, C. Cybele, 2012
New York: MDRC.

Instruments


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Advancing the construct validity of the Early Communication Indicator (ECI) for infants and toddlers: Equivalence of growth trajectories across two Early Head Start samples
Greenwood, Charles R., Q4 2013
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 28(4), 743-758

The Early Communication Indicator (ECI) is a measure for universal screening, intervention decision-making, progress monitoring for infants and toddlers needing higher levels of support, and program accountability. In the context of the ECI's long-term wide-scale use for these purposes, we examined the invariance of ECI measurement in two samples of the same Early Head Start (EHS) population differing in the years data were collected. Invariance or equivalence across samples is an important step in measurement validation because making inferences assumes that the measurements are factorially invariant. A number of time-covarying factors (e.g., assessors, children, etc.) can be hypothesized as threats to measurement invariance. Results of latent growth curve analyses indicated similarity in the functional forms (velocity and shape) of the ECIs four key skill trajectories between groups of children and ECI vocalizations, single, and multiple words trajectories met strong factorial and structural invariance. Gestures met only weak factorial invariance. ECI total communications, a weighted composite of the four scales, also met both strong factorial and structural invariance. With one exception, results indicated that the ECI produced comparable growth estimates over different conditions of programs, assessors, and children over time, strengthening the construct validity of the ECI. Implications are discussed. (author abstract)

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Assessing home visiting program quality
Korfmacher, Jon, 25 June, 2012
Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States.

An examination of the development and field testing of the Home Visiting Program Quality Rating Tool, a quality rating measure, based on data collected from 21 home visiting programs in Wisconsin and Illinois

Reports & Papers


Assessing home visiting program quality: Executive summary
Korfmacher, Jon, 08 June, 2012
Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States.

A summary of an examination of the development and field testing of the Home Visiting Program Quality Rating Tool, a quality rating measure, based on data collected from 21 home visiting programs in Wisconsin and Illinois

Executive Summary


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Assessing quality in toddler classrooms using the CLASS-Toddler and the ITERS-R
La Paro, Karen M., August, 2014
Early Education and Development, 25(6), 875-893

Many very young children attend early care and education programs, but current information about the quality of center-based care for toddlers is scarce. Using 2 observation instruments, the Infant-Toddler Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ITERS-R) and the Classroom Assessment Scoring System, Toddler Version (CLASS-Toddler), 93 child care classrooms for toddlers across the state of North Carolina, representing a range of quality, were assessed to determine overall quality, and associations between observed quality and teachers' ratings of child behavior problems and competence outcomes using the Brief Infant Toddler Social Emotional Assessment. Research Findings: Findings indicated that overall, toddler classrooms were rated as being of moderate quality. Associations between observed quality and teacher-reported child behavior problems and competence outcomes indicated that CLASS-Toddler ratings were positively associated with fewer behavior problems; specifically, children in classrooms with higher levels on the CLASS-Toddler domains of Emotional and Behavioral Support as well as Engaged Support for Learning were reported to have fewer behavior problems. Similarly, the ITERS-R subscales of Interaction and Listening and Talking were positively related to fewer reported behavior problems. Regression models showed that the CLASS-Toddler Emotional and Behavioral Support domain predicted differences in child behavior problems. (author abstract)

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Assessing the strengths of young children at risk: Examining use of the Preschool Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale with a Head Start population
Griffith, Annette K., September, 2010
Journal of Early Intervention, 32(4), 274-285

Over the past decade, there has been an increased need for the development and use of psychometrically acceptable measures to assess the behavioral and emotional strengths of young children served in statewide preschool and Head Start programs. One measure developed to address this need is the Preschool Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale (PreBERS), which is a strength-based instrument designed to evaluate the behavioral and emotional strengths of preschool children aged 3 to 5 years old. In a previous study with a nationally representative sample, researchers found that (a) the items of the PreBERS can best be described by a four-factor structure model (Emotional Regulation, School Readiness, Social Confidence, and Family Involvement), (b) the subscales and total measure have highly acceptable levels of internal consistency, and (c) differences were obtained for levels of strength for preschool children with and without disabilities. The findings of this investigation replicate these previous results with a national sample of children (N = 962) enrolled in Head Start programs. Confirmatory factor analysis and analyses of internal consistency and criterion validity provide support for the use of the PreBERS with children served in Head Start programs. Study limitations and implications are addressed (author abstract)

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Assessment of preschool early literacy skills: Linking children's educational needs with empirically supported instructional activities
Lonigan, Christopher J., May, 2011
Psychology in the Schools, 48(5), 488-501

The importance of the preschool period in becoming a skilled reader is highlighted by a significant body of evidence that preschool children's development in the areas of oral language, phonological awareness, and print knowledge is predictive of how well they will learn to read once they are exposed to formal reading instruction in elementary school. Although there are now a number of empirically supported instructional activities for helping children who are at risk of later reading difficulties to acquire these early literacy skills, limitations in instructional time and opportunities in most preschool settings require the use of valid assessment procedures to ensure that instructional resources are utilized efficiently. In this article, we discuss the degree to which informal, diagnostic, screening, and progress-monitoring assessments of preschool early literacy skills can inform instructional decisions by considering the strengths and weaknesses of each approach to assessment. (author abstract)

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CAGE Adapted to Include Drugs
Brown, Richard L., January, 1998
Preventive Medicine, 27(1), 101-110

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Career Interest Questionnaire
Tyler-Wood, Tandra L., April, 2010
Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 18(2), 341-363

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The Child Care Ecology Inventory: A domain-specific measure of home-based child care quality to promote social competence for school readiness
Rusby, Julie, Q4 2013
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 28(4), 947-959

This study investigates the reliability and validity of the Child Care Ecology Inventory (CCEI), a measure of the quality of family child care in the social domain. The CCEI focuses on research-based environmental features and caregiving practices for promoting positive social development in preschool-age children. A total of 198 family child care homes in the Northwest USA participated. Good scale reliabilities were found for the measures of the environment (Enrichment and Organization) and for caregivers' practices (Monitoring, Positive Attention, Promoting Social Skills, and Teaching Rules) and interrater reliability was adequate for research purposes. The CCEI was associated with other commonly used measures of child care quality that assessed similar environmental and caregiving constructs. Linear regression models were run to determine the features of family child care quality that were concurrently associated with observed child behavior. The child-caregiver ratio, Environment Organization, and caregivers' Teaching Rules were negatively associated with children's problem behavior (noncompliance and aggression). Caregivers' provision of Planned Activities/Routines and Positive Attention were associated with positive child behavior. Results indicate that different aspects of quality are related to different aspects of children's social interactions and behaviors. (author abstract)

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Children's Centre Leadership and Management Rating Scale: CCLMRS
Sylva, Kathy, 2012
Oxford, United Kingdom: University of Oxford, Department of Education

Instruments


Children's Communication Checklist (2nd ed.)
Bishop, D. V. M. (Dorothy V. M.), 2003
London: Pearson Assessments

Instruments


Children's Engagement Questionnaire
McWilliam, R. A., 1991
Chapel Hill, NC: Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center

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Children's participation in research
Brostrom, Stig, September, 2012
International Journal of Early Years Education, 20(3), 257-269

In (post) modem society children are seen as active subjects and participants who have a legitimate basis in the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child. As a consequence of this, children are able to play an active role in the planning of/and participation in both education and research in their own preschool settings. This article offers an argument based on theory and practical examples for the inclusion of children in education and educational research. It also introduces some of the problems which warrant consideration if researchers are to understand and cooperate with children as co-researchers. The author portrays the educational process and the research process as a possible way for the democratisation of children. (author abstract)

Other


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Children's participation in research
Brostrom, Stig, September, 2012
International Journal of Early Years Education, 20(3), 257-269

In (post) modem society children are seen as active subjects and participants who have a legitimate basis in the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child. As a consequence of this, children are able to play an active role in the planning of/and participation in both education and research in their own preschool settings. This article offers an argument based on theory and practical examples for the inclusion of children in education and educational research. It also introduces some of the problems which warrant consideration if researchers are to understand and cooperate with children as co-researchers. The author portrays the educational process and the research process as a possible way for the democratisation of children. (author abstract)

Other


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Children's Progress Academic Assessment
Children's Progress, 2010
New York: Children's Progress

Instruments


Conceptualizing and measuring collaboration in the context of early childhood care and education
United States. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, August, 2013
(Research Brief OPRE 2013-29). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

Despite the fact that many early childhood initiatives depend on the collaboration of multiple organizations and stakeholders, little is known about what makes for successful collaboration within the field of early care and education. In May of 2010, a working meeting was convened by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation to begin to address this issue. This brief builds on work that began during that meeting and extended in the years that followed, particularly work identifying the key components of collaborations and developing a logic model for measuring collaboration in an early childhood context. The first section of this brief presents the logic model, explains its core components, and highlights these components by mapping them onto a hypothetical example of collaboration in early care and education. The next section of the brief shares the results from an extensive review of existing measures of collaboration. Thirty-two measures were found. The last section of the brief describes key measurement considerations and offers some discussion of future directions for collaboration research in the field of early care and education. (author abstract)

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Confusion, Hubbub, and Order Scale
Matheny, Adam P., July-September 1995
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 16(3), 429-444

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Connecting the dots: The promise of integrated data systems for policy analysis and systems reform
Culhane, Dennis P., 22 March, 2010
(2nd ed., Departmental Papers (SPP) School of Social Policy and Practice Vol. 1, no. 3). Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, Intelligence for Social Policy.

This article explores the use of integrated administrative data systems in support of policy reform through interagency collaboration and research. The legal, ethical, scientific and economic challenges of interagency data sharing are examined. A survey of eight integrated data systems, including states, local governments and university-based efforts, explores how the developers have addressed these challenges. Some exemplary uses of the systems are provided to illustrate the range, usefulness and import of these systems for policy and program reform. Recommendations are offered for the broader adoption of these systems and for their expanded use by various stakeholders. (author abstract)

Other


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Consultant Final Perceptions Form
Sheridan, Susan M., 14 December, 1998
Unpublished instrument.

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The costs of childcare
Penn, Helen, July, 2013
(CWRC Working Paper No. 18). London: Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre.

A review of data sources and methods for calculating families' child care expenses in the United Kingdom, and a comparison of families' child care expenses in the United Kingdom to those in other member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

Other


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The costs of childcare [Executive summary]
Penn, Helen, July, 2013
(CWRC Working Paper No. 18). London: Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre.

A summary of a review of data sources and methods for calculating families' child care expenses in the United Kingdom, and of a comparison of families' child care expenses in the United Kingdom to those in other member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

Executive Summary


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A cross-cultural comparison of positive behavioral interventions and supports in early childhood classrooms in the United States and South Korea
Steed, Elizabeth A., January-March 2014
Infants and Young Children, 27(1), 30-42

This study examined the implementation of critical features associated with positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) in early childhood classrooms in the United States and South Korea. Each country has a distinct approach to providing early education for young children. There is some evidence that preschool teachers' approaches to managing young children's challenging behavior are influenced by cultural and contextual factors unique to each country. Differences in implementation status were measured using the Preschool-wide Evaluation Tool (PreSET) in early childhood classrooms in both countries. Preschool teachers in the United States used significantly more features of universal tier and program-wide PBIS related to defining and teaching behavioral expectations, responding to appropriate and challenging behavior, providing an organized and predictable environment, and having a leadership team and program support. South Korean teachers collaborated with families significantly more than teachers in the United States. Factors related to cultural variance in PBIS implementation are discussed. (author abstract)

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Cross-site evaluation of the supporting evidence-based home visiting grantee cluster: Evaluation design volume 1
United States. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 30 October, 2009
Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect.

In 2008, the Children's Bureau (CB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funded 17 grants, through cooperative agreements, to address this knowledge gap and prevent child maltreatment. Grantees are to leverage their grant funding with other funding sources to support the EBHV grantee-selected programs and practices. Specifically, grantees are to focus on supporting implementation of, scaling up, and sustaining home visiting programs with high fidelity to their evidence-based models. In addition, grantees will contribute to the knowledge base about large-scale implementation with fidelity by conducting local implementation and outcome evaluations, along with analyses of program costs. Each cooperative agreement runs for five years. The first year (fiscal year [FY] 2008-2009) was a planning year; grantees are to implement their plans during the remaining four years (FY 2009-2010 through FY 2012-2013). CB/ACF has funded Mathematica Policy Research and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, along with our consultant Brenda Harden Jones from the University of Maryland, to conduct a six-year cross-site evaluation of the grantees' programs. As in the cooperative agreements, the first year of the cross-site evaluation was a planning year. Mathematica-Chapin Hall, in collaboration with the 17 EBHV grantees and their local evaluators, will conduct the cross-site evaluation during the remaining five years. The primary purpose of the cross-site evaluation is to identify successful strategies for adopting, implementing, and sustaining high-quality home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment. The evaluation was designed to be participatory and utilization-focused, engaging the grantees and other stakeholders at key points in the process and incorporating information gathered back into the program models and evaluation framework. To achieve these goals, the Mathematica-Chapin Hall team will support rigorous local evaluations carried out within a Peer Learning Network (PLN), and use data from local evaluations and crosssite research to assess participant, program, and systems outcomes. A unique feature of this evaluation is the careful attention it will pay to the infrastructure supports for and the implementation fidelity of the home visiting programs. The cross-site evaluation will add to the current home visiting evaluation literature, which tends to focus specifically on program impacts. The cross-site evaluation will focus on domains central to the implementation and monitoring of home visiting programs: systems change, fidelity to the evidence-based model, costs of home visiting programs, and family and child outcomes. The cross-site evaluation also will analyze the process that each grantee uses to implement the grant. This report describes the cross-site evaluation design. The Mathematica-Chapin Hall team worked closely with the 17 EBHV grantees and their local evaluators, as well as CB/ACF and other federal partners, to design the cross-site evaluation. (author abstract)

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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