Browse the Collection

RC Produced by Research Connections

* Peer Reviewed Journal

Current Filters: State:COLORADO [remove]; Classification:Cognitive Development [remove];

5 results found.
[1]  
Select Citation
Result Resource Type

The Cost, Quality and Child Outcomes in Child Care Centers Study
Peisner-Feinberg, Ellen S.,
Denver, CO: Center for Research on Economic and Social Policy

A longitudinal study of the relationships between children's experiences in center-based care and school and their social, emotional and cognitive outcomes

Major Research Projects


*

Genetic and environmental influences on vocabulary and reading development
Olson, Richard K., January, 2011
Scientific Studies of Reading, 15(1), 26-46

A longitudinal study of changes in the influence of genes and the environment on the reading and vocabulary scores of children measured at prekindergarten, second grade, and fourth grade, based on data collected from 997 pairs of twins from four countries

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Identifying baseline and ceiling thresholds within the Qualistar Early Learning Quality Rating and Improvement System
Le, Vi-Nhuan, 2014
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, (), 1-12

Increasingly, states are implementing quality rating and improvement systems (QRIS) as a means of improving the availability of high-quality child care and children's school readiness skills. A fundamental design decision under QRIS is where to set the thresholds on the quality measures used in the program assessment component of the QRIS. This study applied generalized additive modeling (GAM) on data from Colorado's QRIS in order to identify thresholds on several components of Colorado's QRIS, including the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ECERS-R), classroom ratios, and staff credentials. We found evidence of baseline thresholds that needed to be surpassed before significant relationships between quality and outcomes could be observed. In addition, there were ceiling thresholds, such that beyond certain cut-points, gains in quality were associated with little to no improvements in outcomes. Based on this work, it appears that GAM can be used to empirically identify thresholds, but more research is needed to understand the applicability of the GAM-derived thresholds in other early care contexts and settings. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Making summer count: How summer programs can boost children's learning
McCombs, Jennifer Sloan, 2011
(MG-1120-WF). Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation.

A review of research on summer learning loss and summer program effectiveness and costs, and an examination of school district efforts to develop summer learning programs, based on case studies and key informant interviews

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

The school to home link: Summer preschool and parents
Wiggin, Mallene, November, 2012
Seminars in Speech and Language, 33(4), 290-296

This study investigates the amount of language available to children in the home environment and a summer preschool program. The purpose of this study was twofold. First, the study sought to gain information about patterns of language use among families of preschoolers with hearing loss. Additionally, the project was designed to provide an initial investigation into the impact of reduced educational programming over summer months for children with hearing loss. Children with varying degrees of hearing loss were enrolled in an auditory-oral 6-week part-time program. The language environment during preschool and at home was analyzed through use of Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA). LENA is a digital language processor that can record and analyze through specific measurements the natural language environment of a child. Overall, the children studied received significantly more complex language in preschool than in the home environment. The data suggest that children with hearing loss benefit from the opportunity to attend summer preschool programming. Additionally, it is critical that parents of preschoolers continue to receive parental education surrounding use of language strategies in the home environment. Implications for practice are discussed. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Select Citation
[1]  

Search Feedback


 



Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Google Translate