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Consequences of Childhood Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence in Chicago, Illinois, 1994-2000
University of Chicago, 2008
Emery, Clifton R. CONSEQUENCES OF CHILDHOOD EXPOSURE TO INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE IN CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, 1994-2000 [Computer file]. ICPSR20344-vl. Chicago, IL: Clifton R. Emery, University of Chicago [producer], 2006. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-04-15.

This data collection uses data from the first two waves of the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) and seeks to analyze the consequences of childhood exposure to intimate partner violence by measuring domestic violence exposure, the impact of exposure on the child's cognitive functioning, the behavioral impact of exposure to domestic violence, anxiety, and the parent-child relationship.

Data Sets


Early Childhood Longitudinal Study: Birth Cohort, 2001-2002, 9-Month Data [UNITED STATES]
National Center for Education Statistics, 2005
U.S. Dept. of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Early Childhood Longitudinal Study [United States]: Birth Cohort, 2001-2002, 9-Month Data [Computer file]. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) [producer and distributor].

The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study is designed to provide decision makers, researchers, child care providers, teachers, and parents with detailed information about children's early life experiences. The birth cohort of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-B) looks at children's health, development, care, and education during the formative years from birth through first grade.

Data Sets


Early Childhood Longitudinal Study [United States]: Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999, Kindergarten-Eighth Grade Full Sample
United States. Department of Education, May, 2010
United States Department of Education. Institute of Education Sciences. National Center for Education Statistics. Early Childhood Longitudinal Study [United States]: Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999, Kindergarten-Eighth Grade Full Sample [Computer file]. ICPSR28023-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2011-05-27. doi:10.3886/ICPSR28023

The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999, Kindergarten-Eighth Grade Full Sample includes the kindergarten, first, third, fifth, and eighth grade data collections for the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K). Unlike the public-use longitudinal files released in previous rounds, this file contains all data for all ECLS-K sample cases that have been publicly released in any of the rounds. Thus, it can be used for within-year (cross-sectional) analyses of any round of data collection and cross-year (longitudinal) analyses of combinations of rounds. It focuses on children's early school experiences beginning with kindergarten through eighth grade. It is a nationally representative sample that collects information from children, their families, their teachers, and their schools. ECLS-K provides data about the effects of a wide range of family, school, community, and individual variables on children's cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development, their early learning and early performance in school, as well as their home environment, home educational practices, school environment, classroom environment, classroom curriculum, and teacher qualifications. The following summarizes each wave of this study. 1998-1999 (the Kindergarten year): The ECLS-K child assessments, parent interviews, and teacher questionnaires were conducted in the fall. Children, parents, and teachers participated again in the spring, along with school administrators. 1999-2000 (the First grade year): The ECLS-K conducted child assessments and parent interviews for a 30 percent sub-sample in the fall. The full sample of children, parents, teachers, and school administrators participated in the spring. 2002 (the Third grade year): The ECLS-K conducted child assessments and parent interviews in the spring. Teachers and school administrators completed questionnaires. 2004 (the Fifth grade year): The ECLS-K conducted child assessments and parent interviews in the spring. Teachers and school administrators completed questionnaires. 2007 (the Eighth grade year): The ECLS-K followed the children into middle school. Information was collected from the children, their parents, teachers, and school administrators. For more detailed information about this data collection, please refer to the user guide.

Data Sets


Impact of Alcohol or Drug Use and Incarceration on Child Care in Santa Clara County, California, 2003
Wiley, James, 2005
Wiley, James A. IMPACT OF ALCOHOL OR DRUG USE AND INCARCERATION ON CHILD CARE IN SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, 2003 [Computer file]. ICPSR04211-v1. San Francisco, CA: San Francisco State University [producer], 2003. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-10-11.

This pilot study was conducted to better understand the jailed population in terms of the number of families at risk and the relationship between parental substance use and incarceration and its impact on the children of the incarcerated. The study aimed to describe the jailed population, their needs in relation to substance abuse and parenting issues, to explore children's risk factors resulting from having a parent with substance abuse and/or criminal justice involvement, and ultimately to offer a point of intervention for parents and children at risk.

Data Sets


National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies
United States. Department of Health and Human Services, 2002
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NATIONAL EVALUATION OF WELFARE-TO-WORK STRATEGIES [Data files and documentation on CD-ROM]. New York, NY: Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation [Producer]. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, Research Data Center [Distributor]. (no longer accessible as of 2/9/2012)

A controlled random assignment longitudinal study of the effectiveness of welfare-to-work programs collecting data on child care and child well-being.

Data Sets


National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being, 2001-2010
United States. Department of Health and Human Services,
Cornell University, College of Human Ecology, Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect.

The National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW) provides detailed, longitudinal information on the experiences of children and families who have entered the child welfare system. NSCAW includes a child welfare services investigation sample of over 5,000 reported child victims from 92 different communities in 36 states. These children were under the age of 15 years between October 1999 and December 2000, when their child protective services investigation took place. NSCAW also includes a long-term foster care sample of an additional 727 children who had been in out-of-home care for about 12 months over the same timeframe. Baseline data collection took place an average of four months following the child maltreatment investigation, and follow-ups were conducted 1, 1?, 3, and 5 years afterward. The oldest children in NSCAW were young adults at the latest follow-up, when they were asked additional questions about employment, housing, family formation, and adult functioning.

Data Sets


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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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