Browse the Collection

RC Produced by Research Connections

* Peer Reviewed Journal

Current Filters: Pub Year:2007 [remove]; Classification:Behavior/Social & Emotional Development/Socialization [remove];

65 results found.
[1]   2   3     >    >
Select Citation
Result Resource Type

*

Academic competence in preschool: Exploring the role of close relationships and anxiety
Wood, Jeffrey J., 2007
Early Education and Development, 18(2), 223-242

A discussion of preschool children’s psychosocial pathway to school readiness and the importance of primary caregiver attachment as it relates to children’s anxiety, peer relationships and academic success, based on parent and teacher interviews and evaluations of 31 preschool children

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Aesthetic experience and early language and literacy development
Johnson, Helen L., April 2007
Early Child Development and Care, 177(3), 311-320

An exploration of the connections between theory and research in language development and children’s engagement with the arts, and their implications for early childhood classroom practice

Other


get fulltext

*

Are there long-term effects of early child care?
Belsky, Jay, March/April 2007
Child Development, 78(2), 681-701

An analysis of the links between early child care and school-age children's development, socioemotional functioning, and academic performance, based on data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Assessment and implementation of positive behavior support in preschools
Benedict, Elizabeth A., Fall 2007
Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 27(3), 174-192

An assessment of the implementation of positive behavior support (PBS) models in early childhood education settings, based on a study of 15 classrooms in a Pacific Northwest community

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Babies and young children in nurseries: Using psychoanalytic ideas to explore tasks and interactions
Elfer, Peter, March 2007
Children & Society, 21(2), 111-122

An application of theories from psychoanalysis in a conceptual framework for emotional interactions in the nursery based on data from a study of 6 nurseries

Reports & Papers


*

Behavior problem trajectories and first-grade cognitive ability and achievement skills: A latent growth curve analysis
Bub, Kristen L., August, 2007
Journal of Educational Psychology, 99(3), 653-670

An investigation of the relationship between behavior problems at age 2 and school performance in first grade, using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Behaviour and skills in six-year-old children in a 'high risk' programme
Knivsberg, Ann-Mari, 2007
British Journal of Special Education, 34(1), 10-18

An analysis of the correlation between behavior problems and cognitive, linguistic, and motor skills in a sample of 31 children, with an average age of 6 years and 4 months, enrolled in a special education program for children with problem behavior in Norway

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Challenging behaviors: Preschool as a contributing or ameliorating factor?
McCabe, Lisa A., January, 2007
New Brunswick, NJ: National Institute for Early Education Research (No longer accessible as of August 16, 2012).

A review of research on the relationship between children's preschool experiences and challenging behaviors

Other


*

Child's attachment to his/her mother, father and kindergarten teacher
Cugmas, Zlatka, May 2007
Early Child Development and Care, 177(4), 349-368

An analysis of the relationships between attachments to mothers, fathers, and kindergarten teachers in a sample of 178 kindergarten children aged 36 to 82 months, using newly developed scales of attachment

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

A comparison of the effects of two social skill training approaches on teacher and child behavior
Hyatt, Keith J., Fall 2007
Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 22(1), 85-96

A comparison of the social skills of preschool children engaged in art activities following an 8-day period of intervention in three inclusive classrooms: one using a social skills curriculum, one in which a teacher used verbal reinforcement in response to children’s target behaviors, and one in which neither strategy was used

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Developmental Intergroup Theory: Explaining and reducing children's social stereotyping and prejudice
Bigler, Rebecca S., June 2007
Current Directions in Psychological Science, 16(3), 117-171

An exploration of the social and cognitive factors that may lead to the formation of prejudices and social stereotyping in young children, offering suggestions for social policies and research to address the issue

Other


get fulltext

*

Early childhood learning standards: Tools for promoting social and academic success in kindergarten
Logue, Mary E., January 2007
Children & Schools, 29(1), 35-43

An argument for the use of ealry childhood learning standards to help promote successful school transitions and a discussion of the role of school social workers in helping early educators teach social skills

Other


get fulltext

Early childhood mental health in Cuyahoga County, Ohio
Manos, Elizabeth, 2007
In D. F. Perry, R. K. Kaufmann, & J. Knitzer (Eds.), Social & emotional health in early childhood: Building bridges between services and systems (pp. 189-209). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

A description of the developing coordinated system of services for young children and their families in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, since the late 1990s

Other


*

Early student-teacher relationships of children with and without intellectual disability: Contributions of behavioral, social, and self-regulatory competence
Eisenhower, Abbey S., August 2007
Journal of School Psychology, 45(4), 363-383

An examination of the quality of student teacher relationships (STR) among 6 year-old children with and without intellectual disability, considering child characteristics as predicators of STR and using data from the children at age 3

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Effective Pre-School and Primary Education 3-11 Project (EPPE 3-11): Influences on children’s attainment and progress in Key Stage 2: Cognitive outcomes in year 5
Sammons, Pam, February, 2007
Nottingham, United Kingdom: Great Britain, Department for Education and Skills.

An examination of the degree to which attendance at particular preschools and primary schools impact children’s cognitive and socio-behavioral development, based on study data from the end of children’s fifth year of primary school

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Effective Pre-School and Primary Education 3-11 Project (EPPE 3-11): Influences on children’s attainment and progress in Key Stage 2: Cognitive outcomes in year 5 [Research brief]
Sammons, Pam, February, 2007
[Brief No: RB828]. Nottingham, United Kingdom: Great Britain, Department for Education and Skills.

A summary of a study of the degree to which attendance at particular preschools and primary schools impact children’s cognitive and socio-behavioral development, based on study data from the end of children’s fifth year of primary school

Fact Sheets & Briefs


get fulltext

Effective Pre-School and Primary Education 3-11 Project (EPPE 3-11): Influences on children’s attainment and progress in Key Stage 2: Cognitive outcomes in year 5 [Summary report]
Sammons, Pam, 2007
[Research Report No 828]. Nottingham, United Kingdom: Great Britain, Department for Education and Skills.

A summary of a study of the degree to which attendance at particular preschools and primary schools impact children’s cognitive and socio-behavioral development, based on study data from the end of children’s fifth year of primary school

Executive Summary


get fulltext

Effective Pre-school and Primary Education 3-11 project (EPPE 3-11): Influences on children’s development and progress in Key Stage 2: Social/behavioural outcomes in year 5
Sammons, Pam, August 2007
(Research Brief DCSF-RB007). Nottingham, United Kingdom: Great Britain, Department for Children, Schools and Families.

A summary of a study of the social and behavioral development of children in year 5 of primary school in England and their relationship to family and home learning environments and to preschool and primary school experiences, based on data from a longitudinal study of the relationship of preschool and primary school experiences to children's development

Fact Sheets & Briefs


get fulltext

Effective Pre-school and Primary Education 3-11 project (EPPE 3-11): Influences on children’s development and progress in Key Stage 2: Social/behavioural outcomes in year 5
Sammons, Pam, 2007
(Research Report No. DCSF-RR007). Nottingham, United Kingdom: Great Britain, Department for Children, Schools and Families.

A study of the social and behavioral development of children in year 5 of primary school in England and their relationship to family and home learning environments and to preschool and primary school experiences, based on data from a longitudinal study of the relationship of preschool and primary school experiences to children's development

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Effective Pre-school and Primary Education 3-11 project (EPPE 3-11): Influences on children’s development and progress in Key Stage 2: Social/behavioural outcomes in year 5 [Executive summary]
Sammons, Pam, 2007
(Research Report No. DCSF-RR007). Nottingham, United Kingdom: Great Britain, Department for Children, Schools and Families.

A summary of a study of the social and behavioral development of children in year 5 of primary school in England and their relationship to family and home learning environments and to preschool and primary school experiences, based on data from a longitudinal study of the relationship of preschool and primary school experiences to children's development

Executive Summary


get fulltext

*

Effect of poverty on urban preschool children's understanding of conventional time concepts
Flores, Roseanne L., February 2007
Early Child Development and Care, 177(2), 121-132

A comparison of the understanding of conventional time concepts by New York City preschool children raised in poverty with that of their peers not raised in poverty, based on a sample of 36 children either attending Head start programs for homeless children, living in low-income housing and attending neighborhood Head Start programs, or attending university day care centers

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

Effects of the structure of classmates’ perceptions of peers’ academic abilities on children’s perceived cognitive competence, peer acceptance, and engagement
Hughes, Jan N., July 2007
Contemporary Educational Psychology, 32(3), 400-419

An examination of the impact of the structure of peers’ perceptions of classmates’ academic abilities on children’s social acceptance, self-perceived cognitive competence, and teacher-rated classroom engagement, based on evaluations of 291 first grade students

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

*

An evaluation of graduates of a toddlerhood home visiting program at kindergarten age
Allen, LaRue, April, 2007
NHSA Dialog, 10(1), 36--57

In the winter and spring of 2002, 135 kindergartners in five Long Island school districts received a battery of tests focusing on 2 interrelated areas of school readiness: social-emotional skills such as the ability to follow teachers' directions and early literacy skills such as knowledge about books and about the alphabet. In addition, keeping in mind the recommendation of the National Education Goals Panel with regard to school readiness, parents were interviewed about their participation in and support of children's learning at home and at school. Children who had participated in PCHP at ages 2 and 3 were compared, at kindergarten age, with classmates who had not been in the program. Preliminary analyses revealed that PCHP graduates were different from their classmates on a number of variables, however. Specifically, children who participated in PCHP were more likely to have parents who were less educated, more likely to be Latino, and more likely to have parents who worked less hours per week for pay. While there were areas in which the two groups were similar-such as family size, likelihood of parents being married, and parents' age-the areas in which the groups were different each represent risk factors for school failure. Low parental education, immigrant status, and poverty are additive risk factors with regard to children's school readiness, such that children who have all three characteristics are at greater risk than children who have two or one. Further, while these are risks that we have defined, they are likely to be concomitant risks that we haven't defined, such as substandard housing and less health care. (author abstract)

Reports & Papers


get fulltext

Evidence-based practices for young children with and at risk for social-emotional or behavior problems
Fox, Lise, 2007
In D. F. Perry, R. K. Kaufmann, & J. Knitzer (Eds.), Social & emotional health in early childhood: Building bridges between services and systems (pp. 313-334). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

A summary of evidence-based practices for prevention and interventions aimed at social-emotional and behavior problems in young children

Other


Examining social acceptance & rejection
FPG Child Development Institute, April, 2007
(FPG Snapshot No. 44). Chapel Hill, NC: FPG Child Development Institute.

A summary of a mixed-method examination of young children's behavior in inclusive preschool classrooms, specifically focusing on shared characteristics of socially accepted young children with special needs as well as shared characteristics of socially rejected preschool children with special needs

Fact Sheets & Briefs


Select Citation
[1]   2   3     >    >

Search Feedback


 



Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Google Translate