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Assessing the strengths of young children at risk: Examining use of the Preschool Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale with a Head Start population
Griffith, Annette K., September, 2010
Journal of Early Intervention, 32(4), 274-285

Over the past decade, there has been an increased need for the development and use of psychometrically acceptable measures to assess the behavioral and emotional strengths of young children served in statewide preschool and Head Start programs. One measure developed to address this need is the Preschool Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale (PreBERS), which is a strength-based instrument designed to evaluate the behavioral and emotional strengths of preschool children aged 3 to 5 years old. In a previous study with a nationally representative sample, researchers found that (a) the items of the PreBERS can best be described by a four-factor structure model (Emotional Regulation, School Readiness, Social Confidence, and Family Involvement), (b) the subscales and total measure have highly acceptable levels of internal consistency, and (c) differences were obtained for levels of strength for preschool children with and without disabilities. The findings of this investigation replicate these previous results with a national sample of children (N = 962) enrolled in Head Start programs. Confirmatory factor analysis and analyses of internal consistency and criterion validity provide support for the use of the PreBERS with children served in Head Start programs. Study limitations and implications are addressed (author abstract)

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Behavioral Consultation project: Final evaluation report
First 5 Sonoma County (Organization), June, 2004
Santa Rosa, CA: First 5 Sonoma County. (No longer accessible as of April 15, 2013).

An assessment of the Child Care Behavioral Consultation project, designed to address professional needs of providers caring for children with challenging behaviors and improve the quality of care through on-site short-term consultation, cross-disciplinary training and ongoing group case review with early childhood specialists and mental health clinicians

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Bidirectionality in self-regulation and expressive vocabulary: Comparisons between monolingual and dual language learners in preschool
Bohlmann, Natalie L., July/August 2015
Child Development, 86(4), 1094-1111

Significant differences in language and self-regulation skills exist among children when they enter formal schooling. Contributing to these language differences is a growing population of dual language learners (DLLs) in the United States. Given evidence linking self-regulatory processes and language development, this study explored bidirectional associations between English expressive vocabulary and self-regulation skills for monolingual English and DLL preschool children (N = 250) from mixed-income families in Los Angeles. Across three time points, findings provide initial support for bidirectionality between these developing skills for both monolinguals and DLLs. Results provide strong empirical support for vocabulary serving as a leading indicator of self-regulation skills in preschool. Findings also suggest that early self-regulation skills play a particularly important role for vocabulary development. (author abstract)

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Biological sensitivity to context: The interactive effects of stress reactivity and family adversity on socioemotional behavior and school readiness
Obradovic, Jelena, January/February 2010
Child Development, 81(1), 270-289

An examination of the direct and interactive effects of stress reactivity and family adversity on socioemotional and cognitive development in 338 children age 5 to 6 years, in a longitudinal study of social status, biological responses to adversity, and child mental and physical health in three waves from California 29 kindergarten classrooms

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Caregiver involvement in infant peer interactions: Scaffolding in a social context
Williams, Shannon, Q2 2010
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 25(2), 251-266

An examination of child care provider guidance of young children and their early social experiences with peers during infancy from videotapes of 36 infants in three center-based infant child care programs in a medium-sized city in Northern California, that were part of a larger study infant development within the contexts of child care and home environments

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Child care and child development: The NICHD Study of Early Child Care
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 1994
In Developmental follow-up: Concepts, domains and methods. (pp. 377-396). San Diego, CA: Academic Press, Inc.

A description of the theoretical framework for the National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care, assessing relationships among family life, child care processes and child behavioral development

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Child care and children's peer interaction at 24 and 36 months: The NICHD Study of Early Child Care
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2001
Child Development, 72(5), 1478-1500

A study of how time spent in child care, child care quality, and availability of peers relate to children's peer social competence at 23 and 36 months, using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care

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Child-care and family predictors of preschool attachment and stability from infancy
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2001
Developmental Psychology, 37(6), 847-862

An analysis of the relationship between family factors and infant and toddler child care experiences and preschool attachment, using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care

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Child care and mother-child interaction in the first 3 years of life
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 1999
Developmental Psychology, 35(6), 1399-1413

An analysis of the effects of child care on maternal sensitivity and child engagement during the first three years of life based on data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care

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Child outcomes when child care center classes meet recommended standards for quality [Abridged]
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2005
In Child care and child development: Results from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (pp. 358-363). New York: Guilford Press

An abridged reprint of a study of how children's cognition, language and social competence are affected by child care meeting professional quality standards, based on data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care

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Children enrolled in public pre-K: The relation of family life, neighborhood quality, and socioeconomic resources to early competence
Barbarin, Oscar, 2006
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 76(2), 265-276

An examination of the relations of young children's sociodemographic characteristics, parental well-being, family functioning, and neighborhood quality to their early academic achievements and socioemotional competence

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Comparisons of the expectations of parents and teachers for the behavior of preschool children
Winetsky, Carol S., 1978
Child Development, 49(4), 1146-1154

A study of the differences between the behavioral expectations of parents and teachers involved in multiple-system child rearing based on role, social class and ethnicity

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The Cost, Quality and Child Outcomes in Child Care Centers Study
Peisner-Feinberg, Ellen S.,
Denver, CO: Center for Research on Economic and Social Policy

A longitudinal study of the relationships between children's experiences in center-based care and school and their social, emotional and cognitive outcomes

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A day in third grade: A large scale study of classroom quality and teacher and student behavior
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2005
Elementary School Journal, 105(3), 305-323

A study evaluating the quality of 780 third grade classrooms observed as part of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (NICHD SECCYD)

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Do children's attention processes mediate the link between family predictors and school readiness
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2003
Developmental Psychology, 39(3), 581-593

A study of the mediating role of child's attention processes in the relation between family environment and school readiness

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Does amount of time spent in child care predict socioemotional adjustment during the transition to kindergarten?
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2003
Child Development, 74(4), 976-1005

A study of the links between children's socioemotional development and both the cumulative amount of time spent in nonmaternal care from birth to the preschool years, and the quality, type, and other characteristics of child care

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Does amount of time spent in child care predict socioemotional adjustment during the transition to kindergarten? [Abridged]
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2005
In Child care and child development: Results from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (pp. 297-317). New York: Guilford Press

An abridged reprint of a study of how children's socioemotional development is affected by the cumulative amount of time spent in nonmaternal care from birth to the preschool years, and the quality, type and other characteristics of child care, using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care

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Double Jeopardy: Poorer social-emotional outcomes for children in the NICHD SECCYD experiencing home and child-care environments that confer risk
Watamura, Sarah, January/February 2011
Child Development, 82(1), 48-65

A study of the relationships between both home and child care quality and the socioemotional adjustment of groups of children in five different environments at ages 24, 36, and 54 months, based on a secondary analysis of data from 771 children

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Early care experiences: Their relation to social skills and behavior in kindergarten
Smith, Amanda Potoczak, August 2009
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, California State University, Long Beach

An investigation of the relationship between the number of years children receive parental care and their social skills in kindergarten, and an examination of the mediating variables of gender and socioeconomic status, based on data collected from 43 children at a kindergarten in Murrieta, California

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Early child care and children's development in the primary grades: Follow-up results from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2005
American Educational Research Journal, 42(3), 537-570

A follow-up investigation into the effects of the quality, quantity, and type of child care on children’s development through primary school, using longitudinal data collected on child care settings and children's cognitive and social functioning

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Early child care and children's peer interaction at 24 and 36 months [Abridged]
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2005
In Child care and child development: Results from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (pp. 281-296). New York: Guilford Press

An abridged reprint of a study of how time spent in child care, child care quality, and availability of peers relate to children's peer social competence at 23 and 36 months, using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care

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Early child care and mother-child interaction from 36 months through first grade
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2003
Infant Behavior & Development, 26(3), 345-370

A study of the relationship between early child care experiences in a child's first 3 years of life and mother-child interaction through the child's transition to school

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Early child care and self-control, compliance, and problem behavior at 24 and 36 months [Abridged]
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2005
In Child care and child development: Results from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (pp. 263-280). New York: Guilford Press

A comparison of early child care experiences and family factors, such as income-to-need ratio and mother’s psychological adjustment, as predictors of 2- and 3-year-olds’ self-control, compliance, and problem behavior outcomes

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Early child care and self-control, compliance, and problem behavior at twenty-four and thirty-six months
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 1998
Child Development, 69(4), 1145-1170

A study into factors of family and child care experiences as predictors of self-control, compliance and problem behavior in children

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Early student-teacher relationships of children with and without intellectual disability: Contributions of behavioral, social, and self-regulatory competence
Eisenhower, Abbey S., August 2007
Journal of School Psychology, 45(4), 363-383

An examination of the quality of student teacher relationships (STR) among 6 year-old children with and without intellectual disability, considering child characteristics as predicators of STR and using data from the children at age 3

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Ecobehavioral assessment in early childhood programs: A portrait of preschool inclusion
Brown, William H., 1999
The Journal of Special Education, 33(3), 138-153

An observational study of preschoolers' experiences in inclusive classrooms, examining social interactions between children with special needs and children without special needs, and comparing activities and social and nonsocial behaviors of children with special needs with those of typically developing children

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Effects of different instructional approaches on young children's achievement and motivation
Stipek, Deborah J., 1995
Child Development, 66(1), 209-223

A comparison of the impacts on children of academic and child-centered early education programs

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The effects of infant child care on infant-mother attachment security [Abridged]
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2005
In Child care and child development: Results from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (pp. 193-207). New York: Guilford Press

A study of the interaction between child care quality, stability, amount and mother-child relatedness in the first 3 years of life

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The effects of infant child care on infant-mother attachment security: Results of the NICHD Study of Early Child Care
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 1997
Child Development, 68(5), 860-879

A study of the relationship between nonmaternal infant child care arrangements and infant and mother attachment security and relationships

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Emotional support consistency and teacher-child relationships forecast social competence and problem behaviors in prekindergarten and kindergarten
Brock, Laura L., July, 2014
Early Education and Development, 25(5), 661-680

Teachers' ratings of conflict and closeness as well as observed emotional support are known predictors of children's social functioning. Consistency in emotional support represents an emerging line of research. The goal of the present study is to understand whether the relation between the consistency of teachers' emotional support and children's behavior is mediated by teacher-child relationships. The role of gender is also considered. Using MPlus, the present study examines the indirect effect of emotional support consistency in prekindergarten on children's social competence and problem behaviors. Outcomes are extended to kindergarten to test the lasting association between the prekindergarten social environment and child behavior in the kindergarten year. Multigroup models examine gender differences. Research Findings: Observations of 694 prekindergarten classrooms revealed that teachers' emotional support consistency had an indirect effect on social competence and problem behavior through conflict in the teacher-child relationship in prekindergarten and kindergarten. The indirect effect on prekindergarten problem behaviors through conflict was stronger for boys. For closeness, all outcomes were significant with the exception of the indirect effect on problem behaviors in the kindergarten year. Practice or Policy: Consistency in prekindergarten teachers' emotional support has an indirect effect on children's behavior in prekindergarten and the following year in kindergarten through teacher-child relationships. Improving teachers' emotional support consistency may be 1 avenue for strengthening teacher-child relationships. (author abstract)

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An empirical examination of toddler development in inclusive childcare
Stahmer, Aubyn C., 2005
Early Child Development and Care, 175(4), 321-333

A study assessing the cognitive, communication, and behavior skills of typically developing toddlers enrolled in an inclusive preschool program

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Executive functioning at 54 months: Is it predicted by varying levels of quality child care at 6, 24, and 36 months
Foster, Rachel E., 2004
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA

An investigation into the influence of child care quality and caregiver characteristics on children’s attention span and impulse control, based on a subsample of 174 children from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study on Early Child Care

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An exploratory study of mothers' perceptions of acculturation within the preschool context
Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz, October, 2007
(WR-523). Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation.

A study of the relationship of mothers' acculturation to the acculturation of their children, based on in-depth, semi-structured interviews with Latina mothers whose children attend preschool

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Family-school connectedness and children's early social development
Serpell, Zewelanji Natashya, February, 2012
Social Development, 21(1), 21-46

An examination of the relationship between the qualities of family-school interactions and teacher ratings of child social abilities, and an examination of the moderating influences of family characteristics, based on data collected from 2966 children, their parents, their preschool teachers, and some of their kindergarten teachers

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Fostering the development of adaptive coping skills in preschool age children: A curriculum manual
Schipull, Jens A., 2004
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Alliant International University, San Francisco

A description of the development, implementation and evaluation of the effectiveness of the Children's Coping Curriculum, an early childhood intervention designed to foster three coping styles, including Instrumental Intervention, Cognitive Restructuring, and Instrumental Coping

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Friendships in preschool children with autism spectrum disorder: What holds them back, child characteristics or teacher behavior?
Chang, Ya-Chih, January, 2016
Autism, 20(1), 65-74

Children begin to show preferences for specific playmates as early as the first 2 years of life. Children with autism spectrum disorder have difficulty making friends, even in elementary and middle school. However, very little is known about earlier friendships in children with autism such as preschool friendships. This study examined friendships in preschool children with autism and explored how joint attention contributes to these friendships in mainstream settings. A secondary aim was to determine the extent to which teachers used strategies to facilitate friendship development. The participants were 31 mainstreamed preschool children (ages 2-5 years) with autism spectrum disorder. School observations were conducted individually to capture participants' interactions with peers and adults during free play. The results indicated that 20% of the participants had friendships at school. Children with friends were more likely than children without friends to be jointly engaged with their peers during free play, and they used higher joint attention skills. Teachers used few friendship facilitating strategies, and more often used behavioral management strategies within the classrooms. Future studies may want to examine the effects of early interventions and/or teacher training on the development of friendships in preschool children with autism spectrum disorder within the school setting. (author abstract)

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Home environments and young Latino children's school readiness
Farver, Jo Ann M., 2006
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 21(2), 196-212

An investigation of the relations among young Latino children's home environment and parents' literacy skills and the children's oral language skills and social functioning

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How duration of relationship with a care provider and creating connected care with parents impacts resilience in infants and toddlers
Beasley-Sullivan, Kristin L., 2010
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, CA

A study of the relationships between the time duration of care between infants and substitute care providers and child initiative, attachment/relationship, self regulation scores of infants and toddlers, and care providers' views of the children from 154 care provider respondents in 14 licensed infant and toddler child care centers and 7 licensed family child care homes, in Fresno County, California

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Impact findings from the Head Start CARES demonstration: National evaluation of three approaches to improving preschoolers' social and emotional competence
Morris, Pamela A., August, 2014
(OPRE Report 2014-44). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

The Head Start CARES (Classroom-based Approaches and Resources for Emotion and Social skill promotion) demonstration tests three distinct approaches to enhancing children's social-emotional development on a large scale within the Head Start system -- the largest federally funded early-childhood education program in the United States. Conceived and sponsored by the Office of Head Start and the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation in the Administration for Children and Families within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Head Start CARES demonstration was conducted by MDRC, a nonprofit, nonpartisan education and social policy research organization, in collaboration with MEF Associates and several academic partners. The three social-emotional approaches tested in Head Start CARES were called "enhancements" because they complemented and enriched classroom practices that already existed. The effects, or "impacts," of the enhancements were rigorously evaluated by randomly assigning approximately 100 Head Start centers to one of the three enhancements (the program group) or to a control group that continued with "business as usual." Therefore, estimated impacts should be interpreted as the effects of the enhancements over and above any effects of the existing Head Start program in these sites. As described in an earlier report on the Head Start CARES demonstration, a comprehensive professional development system for teachers -- including four to six training sessions, weekly coaching sessions in the classroom, a "real-time" management information system (MIS) to support monitoring, and technical assistance -- supported the scale-up of the enhancements around the country. The teacher training and coaching were generally implemented as intended, supporting satisfactory implementation (a rating of 3 on a scale of 1 to 5) of the social-emotional enhancements in Head Start classrooms and leading to the expected influences on teachers' practices, which are described below. Thus, it appears that the demonstration ensured a fair test of large-scale implementation of the three enhancements, providing a sound basis for evaluating their impact on children and classrooms in the Head Start system. This report presents the impacts of the three enhancements tested in the Head Start CARES demonstration. It focuses on outcomes in the spring of the preschool year for (1) teachers' practices; (2) the climate of the classroom; (3) children's behavior regulation, executive function skills, knowledge and understanding of emotions ("emotion knowledge"), and social problem-solving skills; and (4) children's learning behaviors and social behaviors. In addition to changing teachers' practices, two of the three enhancements had consistent positive impacts on a range of children's social-emotional outcomes, although not necessarily in ways that would be expected according to the theories of change that the CARES team developed. The Head Start CARES study thus demonstrates that preschool children's social-emotional outcomes can be improved when evidence-based approaches -- that is, approaches that have been shown to result in differences in children's social and emotional outcomes -- are implemented at scale with appropriate supports. The report also includes an exploratory set of findings, which have not been previously tested for these enhancements, about whether the enhancements might improve children's early academic skills in preschool and whether they have any sustained effects as preschool children make the transition to elementary school. (author abstract)

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The influences of dimensions of teacher and mother responsiveness on children's social outcomes at 24 and 36 months: A comparison of dyadic and group environments
Cranor, Angela, 2002
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

A study designed to examine specific dimensions of teacher and mother responsiveness that are strongly associated with social outcomes for 399 toddlers at 24 and 462 children 36 months of age within a either family or center based childcare setting

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Mother-child planning, child emotional functioning, and children's transition to first grade
Perez, Susan M., May/June 2009
Child Development, 80(3), 776-791

An investigation into the correlation between the setting of goals for activities and children’s emotional functioning, and an examination in the role of this correlation in children’s transition to first grade, based on a sample of 90 first grade children and their mothers from five preschools in Southern California

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Parents' and teachers' perceptions of school readiness
Otto, Megan Leigh, May 2009
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, California State University, Fresno

A comparison of both social skills and problem behaviors of 113 kindergarteners who either did or did not receive Head Start services in one central California school district

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Peer relations and social adjustment of Latino and Chinese children in Head Start classrooms
Lee, Linda, January, 2016
Early Education and Development, 27(1), 1-17

Research findings: The present study investigated the role of ethnic similarity in the peer preferences and play quality of Latino and Chinese children enrolled in Head Start classrooms and the relationship between peer acceptance and social adjustment in these groups. Participants were 244 children (M [mean age]= 4.6 years old) from Head Start preschools located in the greater Los Angeles area. Results showed that both Chinese and Latino children played more with same-ethnic than cross-ethnic peers, but only Latino children showed same ethnic preferences in friendship nominations. Play dyads of the same ethnic group engaged in more complex play than those of different ethnic groups. Practice or Policy: Findings suggest that preferences for same-ethnic peers are starting to emerge in preschool classrooms. In addition, prosocial behaviors may be important for all children, regardless of ethnicity, to gain peer acceptance. Implications for practice are addressed. (author abstract)

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Preschool aged girls exposed and non-exposed to domestic violence: Differences in behavior problems, play processes, and pretend themes
Berger, Wendy B., 2000
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, California School of Professional Psychology at Alameda, Alameda

An examination of the impact of exposure to domestic violence on the behavioral outcomes and play behaviors of preschool aged girls, based on a sample of 30 four-to five-year old girls attending a Head Start program in Northern California

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Productive activity and the prevention of behavior problems
Bradley, Robert H., 2005
Developmental Psychology, 41(1), 89-98

An examination of the relationship between children's level of productive activity within home and school environments and their ability to self regulate, using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care (NICHD SECC)

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Relations between family predictors and child outcomes: Are they weaker for children in child care? [Abridged]
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, 2005
In Child care and child development: Results from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (pp. 407-417). New York: Guilford Press

An abridged reprint of a study reporting analyses of the mediating effect of nonparental child care on the influence of family factors on infant and toddler cognitive and behavioral development using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care

Reports & Papers


Responding to the mental health needs of infants, toddlers and families
United States. Head Start Bureau, 2003
(Early Head Start Program Strategies). Washington, DC: Early Head Start National Resource Center.

A report highlighting how 10 Early Head Start programs respond to the mental health needs of infants, toddlers, and their families

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The role of child gender and ethnicity in teacher-child relationship quality and children’s behavioral adjustment in preschool
Ewing, Allison R., Q1 2009
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 24(1), 92-105

A study of the influence of child gender, child ethnicity, and teacher-child ethnic match on the association between teacher-child relationship quality and children’s behavioral competence, based on data collected from several hundred white and Mexican-American children in Head Start classrooms in two geographic areas

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Self-reported depression in nonfamilial caregivers: Prevalence and associations with caregiver behavior in child-care settings
Hamre, Bridget, 2004
Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 19(2), 297-318

A study of the prevalence of depression among nonfamilial child care providers and the associations between depression rates and the quality of provider-child interactions, based on data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care (SECC)

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Social acceptance and rejection of preschool children with disabilities: A mixed-method analysis
Odom, Samuel L., November 2006
Journal of Educational Psychology, 98(4), 807-823

A mixed-method examination of young children's behavior in inclusive preschool classrooms, specifically focusing on shared characteristics of socially accepted young children with special needs as well as shared characteristics of socially rejected preschool children with special needs

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Research Connections is supported by grant #90YE0104 from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The contents are solely the responsibility of the National Center for Children in Poverty and the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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